G48 MOS

Glock 48 MOS Review (With Pictures)

Glock 48 MOS Review

The Glock 48 was an excellent idea. The Glock 19 has been the standard-bearer for the Glock series pistols for decades now. While it’s the perfect height and length for many, the gun found itself to be a chubby little fella. The Glock 48 was the skinnier variant. The Glock 48 is essentially a single stack Glock 19 that matches that near-perfect height and length with a significant width reduction. In fact, we’ve written an excellent Glock 48 vs Glock 19 article, if you’re interested.

The Glock 48 shares a typical ten-round magazine with the Glock 43X, and the barrel is just slightly longer, and that extra barrel length adds bullet velocity. Read on for the best Glock 48 MOS review you’ll find. P.S. If you’re interested in the little brother to this pistol, we have an in-depth Glock 43X MOS review as well.

G48 WIDTH 2

The Glock 48 was a sweet pistol, but Glock is now making it a bit better by giving it the MOS treatment. The Glock 48 MOS variant now incorporates built-in optics modularity. The slide is cut for the micro red dot Shield RMSc. The Glock 48 has a very thin slide, so it cannot accommodate most red dot sights. The good news is red dots are getting smaller and we now have the Shield RMSc, Swampfox Sentinel, Holosun 507K, and SIG Romeo Zero readily available.

Also Checkout our Glock 48 holster.

G48 MOS PLATE 6

The Glock 48 MOS and its optics enhancement are a welcome addition to the Glock 48 pistol. That’s not the only change Glock made to the 48 series pistols, and today we will explore all of the significant changes and see where the Glock 48 MOS stacks up with modern carry pistols. 

G48 MOS PLATE 3

Fit and Finish

The Glock 48 premiered initially in a slick, sleek, and attractive silver stainless steel finish. This was a great choice, in my opinion, and gave the new slimline pistols a distinct appearance. The Glock 48 MOS went to a more discrete and less reflective black finish. This was probably a good idea on a gun designed for optics enhancement. Reducing reflections everywhere possible is a good idea on an optically enhanced gun.

 

The Glock 48 MOS uses an nDLC finish. This is a diamond-like coating that is extremely hard and tough. It has a high hardness of 3000 HV. The older tennifer finish on Glocks was only about half that. This is the same finish that protects Glocks on duty around the country and the world, so it’s well-proven and dependable. The gap created by the removable MOS Plate is hardly noticeable and fits cleanly and near perfectly with the slide when not running an optic.

 

The black frame is a timeless and straightforward Glock design. The good news is that it works, looks professional, and far from low grade. You’ll see a lot of lower-end brands have huge markings where the polymer molds meet, but that’s not present with the Glock series of pistols. The Glock 48 MOS gives a pleasant and professional black on black appearance. Also, we have the perfect, professional concealed carry Glock 48 MOS holster for you to carry this Glock in.

 

Specs

As I mentioned before, the Glock 48 MOS is essentially a Glock 19 on a diet. This slim and sleek pistol is 0.16 inches thinner than the Glock 19 with an overall width of 1.10 inches. The Glock 48 is a little shorter than the 19 at 7.28 inches but manages to pack a slightly longer barrel at 4.17 inches. This somewhat longer barrel allows the gun to be sold in Canada with no modification. Previously Glock 19s had their barrels slightly extended to be sold in Canada.

 

The Glock 48 MOS holds ten rounds of 9mm, and the Glock 48 MOS is compatible with the new magazine from Shield Arms. Shield Arms makes a metal magazine with the ability to hold 15 rounds in its flush-fitting design. This gives the Glock 48 a dose of Glock 19 firepower. Although these are an aftermarket magazine and I have no means to testify to their reliability.

G48 MAGAZINE

The Glock 48 MOS weighs 24.97 ounces fully loaded, which is about 5 ounces lighter than a loaded Glock 19. The Glock 48 MOS is 5.04 inches tall, and that height will increase depending on the optic chosen.

 

Ergonomics

There is a lot of good in the ergonomics department of the G48, but there is a little bad too. Let’s start with the bad. The slide lock sucks. All Glock slide locks do, in my opinion, and the issue is their placement and design. They are too far rearward and get effectively pinned down by my thumbs with a thumbs forward grip. The Glock 48 and G48 MOS are no different, and the slide lock is virtually useless in my hands. We will cover all the ergonomics in this Glock 48 MOS review.

 

The excellent news is Glock redesigned the rear of the pistol to incorporate a small beavertail into the gun’s grip design. This protects your hands from slide bite and allows you to have a high and comfortable grip on the weapon. This makes a huge difference in the design of the gun and makes it way more comfortable, at least to me.

G48 RED DOT 1

The Glock 48 MOS is a slimline pistol, but I’m not sure if I would describe it as a subcompact. I think Glock calling it a slimline pistol is perfect. It’s more of a compact in size, and as a compact handgun, it’s quite controllable and very comfortable to shoot. The slim design makes it perfect for shooters with small hands and allows them to maximize their control over the weapon. I do enjoy the lack of finger grooves on the gun and find the stippling to be quite lovely. I prefer the more aggressive setup for enhanced control.

 

The Glock 48 MOS is perfectly suitable for combat use and features a straightforward internal safety system. There is no need to ever think about disabling a safety; it’s automatically disabled when you pull the trigger. The simple design of Glock pistols also makes them very easy to customize, and you can make the gun your own. Dropping in a new trigger, sights, extended magazine releases, and other upgrades are relatively easy and can be done at home.

Features

The Modular Optics System is the most noticeable design change to the Glock 48 MOS. Many may not understand why a red dot on a handgun is such a big deal. That’s understandable, and it’s not necessarily a must-have. However, shooters with optically enhanced firearms have proven to be faster, more accurate, and more capable in low light situations. A Red Dot Optic on a handgun does not require you to align sights, so the dot is easier and faster than irons. New shooters can even benefit from a red dot handgun. All they have to do is put the red dot on the target and pull the trigger. Dive into find all the special features in this Glock 48 MOS review.

Admittedly for those of us who have dedicated a lot of time to iron sights, the transition to a red dot takes time, practice, and lots of ammo. However, it’s a transition worth making, and the red dot adds a lot of potential to a shooter, including long-range shooting.

G48 RED DOT 3

Another new feature worth noting is the attachment of a short Picatinny rail to the G48 MOS. This small section of rail allows you to outfit your weapon with ultra-small weapon lights, lasers, and training devices. Surefire offers subcompact weapon light, which  is perfect for the Glock 48 MOS. They aren’t the only microlight maker on the market, and that seems to be another growing trend. The rail should have premiered with the original Glock 48, but I guess its better late than never.

 

The Glock 48 MOS has the same high visibility follower found in Gen 5 guns. We also get the finger-groove-free grip, reversible magazine release, plus front and rear serrations. The front serrations ensure the slide is easy to work when the gun is equipped with a red dot sight. Glock seemingly thought this pistol out very well and designed it to be a functional and competent combat handgun.

 

Shooting Characteristics

The Glock 48 handles almost identically to a Glock 19. The thinner grip is more comfortable to me, and likely to most people. The grip still fills the hand and provides an ultra-comfortable option for a concealed carry pistol. I hate a hanging pinky, and the G48 and G48 MOS pistols allow for an easy and sure grip on the gun. This keeps the gun on target, especially when being fired rapidly. The addition of the small beavertail allows you to get a nice high grip on the gun without slide bite. This Glock 48 MOS review covers all the characteristics.

 

The Glock 48 is a very easy shooting handgun than handles like a larger weapon. It displaces recoil well and without pain. Even more potent and powerful loads tailored for self-defense handle easily out of the Glock 48 MOS. The MOS is an important part of this gun, and the gun works best with an optic. The optic disregards sight radius and makes the gun just as accurate as something like a larger Glock 34. The Glock 48 does come with the awful sights Glock is known for. These plastic sights should be the first thing replaced. 

 

A Glock is a Glock, and that means you get all the good parts of a Glock and all the bad parts. This includes the meh trigger, crummy sights, and brick-like grip. The good news is the brick is a good bit thinner with the 48’s single stack grip. More good news is that the Glock 48 MOS is an incredibly reliable weapon, and its simple design ensures the gun remains reliable and dependable. Adding an optics cut and light rail isn’t going to impact a gun’s reliability.

 

The Glock 48 MOS is quite accurate and will get you on target and keep you there as long as you do your part from trigger control and grip. The Glock 48 is a very easy handling weapon and is more than accurate enough for self-defense.

 

Concealment

The Glock 48 is not the easiest gun to conceal, but it is one of the most comfortable. The gun is Glock 19-sized basically, but much thinner, and that results in a more comfortable carry piece. The Glock 48 can be carried, but proper holster selection is key to the gun’s success. Here at Clinger holsters, we can most certainly help you with proper holster selection. We offer many G48 MOS holsters including Inside and Outside the Waistband.

This Glock 48 MOS Review covers all the concealment related topics for the Glock 48 MOS.

G48 WIDTH 1

The Glock 48 MOS gains a little height with an optic, but it’s hardly noticeable, and the optic is well worth the price of a little extra room.

 

The Glock 48 is the perfect candidate for a good strong side IWB holster or a rock-solid AIWB rig. Either one will make the bigger gun disappear on the body. You can carry a light and optically enhanced firearm with minimal fuss. The Glock 48’s lightweight and thin design ensure you don’t get poked and prodded during the day.

 

The New Standard

The Glock 48 MOS is really the perfect size for a capable combat handgun. It’s big enough to be easily controllable but thin enough for easy concealment. The addition of an optic cut and light rail make it capable of keeping up with the big boys. The design is outright genius from a carry perspective.

 

The Glock 48 MOS is a game-changer, and while it’s hard to get excited about just another Glock, I feel the Glock 48 MOS is far from just another Glock. It’s the right combination of size and features for a concealed carry, combat-ready handgun. It might shake me from carrying my P365. The Glock 48 MOS has made its European debut paired with the RMSc optic. No word on if that same package will be offered here, but we’ll keep an eye out.

G48 RED DOT 4

What say you? Is the Glock 48 MOS the Glock for you? Did you like the Glock 48 MOS review?

 

Let us know below and checkout our Glock 48 MOS holsters too.

 

G43X MOS in open hand

Glock 43X MOS Review (With Pictures)

Glock 43x MOS Review

The Glock 43X is the reverse stretch of Glock pistols. Glock took the wildly successful Glock 43 pistol and stretched the grip to accommodate a newer 10 round magazine. The Glock 43X became a very popular concealed carry pistol and opened up a new market for Glock slimline pistols. We will explore its various features in this Glock 43x MOS review.

The Glock 43X has recently gotten a welcome addition in the form of a MOS model. The new Glock 43X MOS is hitting shelves now and will likely be a huge hit.

Glock 43X vs Glock 43X

 

MOS stands for Modular Optics System. This pistol bears the name MOS, but the MOS system on these guns is much different from the standard MOS system.

The standard system comes with a multitude of plates to accommodate tons of red dot optics. 

The Glock 43X is a superbly small handgun, so it can’t accommodate bigger red dot sights. This MOS system is cut for the Shield RMSc pistol red dot.

This is one of the smallest pistol red dots on the market, and the footprint of the optic is quickly becoming popular.

This opens it up for the Shield RMSc, SIG ROMEO Zero, SwampFox Sentinel, and Holosun 507k, and a few newer models hitting the market hard and fast.

That’s not the only change Glock made to the 43X series pistol though so let’s dive in and check out the Glock 43X MOS and how Glock made a micro fighting pistol a bit more capable.

While these new small optics have yet to prove themselves, they are becoming increasingly popular. Especially when you pair it with a great Glock 43X MOS holster. 

Glock 43x MOS Review

Fit and Finish

A big change Glock made to the Glock 43X MOS was changing the slide color from stainless steel to a traditional black nDLC finish. The guns came out in a black finish prior to the MOS series, but the MOS series will be exclusively nDLC.

This diamond-like coating is ultra-strong and proven to be durable on the vast majority of Glock pistols. The hardness level is extreme, and it doubled from the older tenifer finish.

I can’t lie, I like the stainless steel coating, and I think it makes the plain Jane, Spartan Glocks stand out a little, but I understand the change.

Stainless looks good, but the black is less reflective and will create fewer reflections on the lens of your red dot optic. The black finish gives the gun a more discrete look and allows it to disappear a bit better under a cover garment.

Silver does tend to stand out a bit more than most.

The frame is the traditional Glock black polymer frame. It’s a bit blocky and plain, but looks professional and is molded precisely. The Glock frame isn’t fancy but is perfectly suitable and well made.

You won’t see issues with the frame’s molding marks or texture.

The appearance of the Glock 43X demands a black optic to keep the black on black theme going. Luckily, black is the most common color in the tactical optics world. It’ll also match your shoes.

Specs

The Glock 43X MOS is a superbly thin and lightweight handgun designed with concealed carry in mind. The G43X MOS has an ultra-short barrel, and this makes OWB carry possible and makes the 43X MOS easy to carry IWB and AIWB (Appendix Inside the Waistband).

The overall length is 6.5 inches long, and the overall height is 5.04 inches, including the magazine.

Glock 43X MOS Dimensions

The overall width is a slightly chunky 1.10 inches, and the slide is .87 inches wide. The gun weighs 23.07 ounces fully loaded. The gun isn’t the thinnest option, but it’s still exceptionally easy to conceal.

The gun is remarkably balanced, and those of us who want something small and light to carry but still want a full grip will love the Glock G43X MOS.

Glock 43X MOS Width Measurement

As you add an optic, the gun’s height and overall weight will change, but not significantly. The modern micro red dot is a super small and lightweight design that barely adds bulk to your firearm. The G43X MOS is one of the smallest optics-enhanced guns on the market. 

The gun comes with ten-round magazines, and it cannot take magazines made for the G43. This cuts off a lot of extended magazines made for the G43. However, a company called Shield Arms makes a 15 round magazine that fits flush with the G43X MOS and Glock 48.

This adds five rounds of flavor to your Glock series pistol. I have no personal experience with these magazines, so I cannot speak to their reliability, but they do seem to be well-loved by Glock 43X MOS and Glock 48 owners.

G43X MOS magazine

 

Ergonomics 

The Glock 43X MOS offers a much better grip than the original G43. The longer grip fills the hand better and allows the gun to fit the 10 round single stack magazine with ease. Another major improvement is the slight beavertail that provides some protection for my hand.

Me and Glocks sometimes don’t get along because I’m a victim of constant slide bite from the Glock series. The Glock G43X MOS is different and provides a nice little overhang that allows me to have a nice high grip and keeps my hand from getting bit.

G43X MOS Beavertail in hand

 

The Glock 43X MOS is a very simple gun. Glock has a reputation for making guns as simple as possible, and admittedly simple is good in a pistol designed for combat. The 43X MOS features three safety devices, but not a single one is a manual safety.

The only thing close to that is the trigger safety, which will not allow the trigger to fall without a complete and purposeful press. This keeps things quite simple and allows a shooter to have a gun they can instantly engage with without much thought behind it.

Safety in Glock 43X MOS

The G43X’s hand-filling design does help with recoil and control. The grip allows you to comfortably control and handle the gun.

It’s much more comfortable for rapid-fire training and long days at the range than the standard 43. This is a must-have for an optics-enhanced gun.

A real grip ensures you can hold the dot steady and take full advantage of all the benefits a red dot has to offer you. 

The G43X MOS isn’t perfect ergonomically.

One of the issues with the gun is the slide lock. With a good, thumbs forward grip, the slide lock will be pinned down and fail to engage when the gun is empty.

This might be a problem associated with my sausage-like fingers, but it’s one that plagues every Glock I’ve ever shot, including the G43X (non-MOS version).

That’s the life of dudes with 2XL sized hands.

G43X MOS Slide Release

 

Features

Red Dot Cut Out

G43X MOS Plate Cutout

The star of the show is clearly the gun’s ability to utilize an optic. An optic on a handgun might seem silly to some, but they’ve been proven by reputable trainers around the industry to be a drastic improvement on your handgun’s potential. 

G43X MOS Red Dot 2

A dot equipped handgun is faster, more precise, and allows a shooter to hit targets at further distances with ease. On the G43X MOS, the optic makes a ton of sense.

swampfox front angle

Small guns typically have a short sight radius, and the presence of a dot completely erases the sight radius issue. This allows a small gun to be as precise as a large gun. Although learning to use the red dot takes some extra practice. It’s well worth the investment in the end.

swampfox profile

The red dot cut cuts in the slide aren’t the only big change. 

Picatinny Rail

g43x mos picatinny rail

Glock also added a small Picatinny rail on its new G43X MOS model. This small Picatinny rail allows users to attach any number of devices. This includes lasers, small lights like the Olight Mini Valkyrie, or even training devices like the MantisX.

The Picatinny rail is a nice touch, and as red dots and lights become more mandatory on guns, more companies will embrace small rails on their carry guns.

The G43X MOS also comes with most of the updates Glock made for the Gen 5 guns. This includes a high visibility follower in the magazine, a smooth finger groove-less design, front serrations, and a reversible magazine release.

The front serrations are an important touch and allow you to easily manipulate the slide when the gun is wearing a red dot. They’ve been on the gun since the original G43X and are more important on the MOS system. 

g43x mos front serrations closeup

Front serrations ensure you can manipulate the weapon without gripping the optic. You can grab the optic to manipulate the slide but you’re likely to smudge oil from your skin on the glass when you do so. A smudge-free optic works much better.

g43x mos front serrations

The below image shows a big thumbprint on the Swampfox Optic.

Shooting Characteristics

The Glock 43X is a weirdo, and the MOS model is also still a weirdo. The short slide combined with the compact-sized grip makes the gun interesting, to say the least.

The Glock 43X MOS fills the hand nicely, and the beavertail extension allows for a nice high grip on the gun. This allows you to maximize control over the gun and keep it on target, even when firing rapidly.

The original 43 used to bite the hell out of my hand, and I hated it. I would start flinching just a bit between each and every shot. That is long-gone with the Glock 43X MOS.

The iron sights are like all Glock iron sights, and they are made from plastic and kind of suck. Toss on a red dot and replace the sights with suppressor height sights for co-witnessing asap.

The recoil is minimal, especially with 115-grain loads. You’ll feel a bit more snap with self-defense loaded +P loads. This snap is notable, but not uncontrollable or even painful.

It has some jump and kick to it, but it’s not like a 357 from a snub-nosed by any means.

G43X MOS Bullets

The gun cycles just about anything you could put through it. The G43X is built to the same standards as all Glocks, and a big part of that is reliability.

You can say a lot about Glock pistols, but you can’t say they aren’t reliable.

They eat everything without complaint and just keep on going even with poor maintenance.

You can say the trigger is average at best, the grip is blockish, and the magazine release needs to be bigger. All are very true, and the Glock 43X MOS carries all the issues the regular G43X has.

The good news is these problems are very small in the grand scheme of things.

Concealment

As a gun designed for concealed carry, size matters, and the Glock 43X MOS is not necessarily a big gun, but it’s not the smallest either.

Glock 43X MOS in IWB Holster

The G43 is admittedly easier to conceal just by design. However, the G43X MOS is far from difficult to conceal. However, the addition of an optic will make it a slightly bigger gun height-wise.

The G43X’s light weight makes it a comfortable gun to carry, and it won’t sag or pull at your waist.

Glock 43X MOS IWB Holster

It’s a gun that’s easy to forget you’re even carrying. The G43X MOS disappears easily under a T-shirt. The shorter barrel design allows it to be comfortably carried OWB, and that’s my preferred method of carry.

The shorter barrel means you won’t have to wear a tall shirt to make it disappear.

Glock 43X MOS Holster with Cushion

The gun is also quite comfortable for appendix carry and traditional IWB. IWB is typically an easy way to carry almost any gun, but AIWB can be trickier with long guns.

Glock 43x in Appendix Holster

I haven’t mastered AIWB with a full-sized gun just yet, but a nice short gun like the G43X MOS is the perfect AIWB companion. 

All in a Day’s Work

Glock 43X MOS

The Glock 43X MOS is a helluva upgrade to the G43X. The presence of a rail and optic allows the gun to step into the territory of full-sized guns. The extra presence of an optic and light makes the guns all the more capable, and Glock made some wise choices with the Glock 43X MOS.

Glock 43X MOS

The Glock 43X MOS is a very capable, but also easy to conceal weapon. With the right holster and belt combo, you’ll be able to pack the G43X, spare magazines, and a good attitude due to your comfortably concealed weapon.

Glock 43X MOS

Check out the Glock 43X MOS and take a peek at the Glock 43X MOS holsters.

g43x mos holster for inside the waistband

Let us know below if the G43X MOS is for you, or are you a G48 MOS kinda person?  

G43X MOS in hand rear profile G43X MOS In Hand Profile

g43x mos iwb holster

Please comment to let us know if you liked our Glock 43x MOS review. Also Checkout our Taurus G3c Review

Taurus G3C next to Sig P365

Taurus G3C VS Sig P365: Is It Worth Twice The Price?

This video goes into detail about the differences of these two pistols.

There’s even slow motion video to show recoil.

Taurus G3C VS Sig P365

 

Neither of these great pistols will do you much good without an amazing holster to carry them in.

Checkout our excellent Sig P365 Holsters & Taurus G3C Holsters and you’ll actually enjoy carrying your pistol.

Reliability

This seems to be the biggest question when comparing the Taurus G3C VS Sig P365. Can I trust my life with a Taurus G3C in my concealed carry holster?

I can say that after a couple thousand rounds through the Taurus G3C, it’s just as reliable as my Sig P365.

Also, I have many thousands of rounds through my Taurus PT111 G2. The Taurus PT111 G2 is the gun that the G2C and G3C are “based on”.I use the words “based on” very loosely.

That’s because all three are really the same gun. They really are. Taurus claims to have tweaked the trigger.

In reality, the trigger is very similar amongst all three models: PT111 G2, G2C, and G3C.

The only real differences are as follows:
The G2C dropped the safety lock inside the pistol that used a key to disable the pistol.
The G3C widened the trigger safety lever and added a better finish.

 

They’re the same pistol. This is a good thing. I say this because the PT111 G2 has been an amazing pistol for me with thousands of rounds through it with zero malfunctions.

Bottom line: the Taurus G3C is reliable. I have also discussed this in detail in my Taurus G3C Review.

Taurus G3C in front of Sig P365

Is the Sig P365 reliable? It’s 100% reliable. Plus it has the Sig reputation for durability, engineering, and high quality to go along with its outstanding reliability.

They are both reliable.

However, I would expect the Sig to go many more thousands of rounds than the Taurus before it does finally break (it better had for the price).

We’ve talked about how legendary this Sig is in our Sig P365 Review.

Sig P365 In Front Of Taurus G3C

Ergonomics

The ergonomics on both of these pistols are top notch. They both feel great in the hand.

However, I will give the slight edge to the Taurus G3C.
Why?

It feels better in the hand.Plus, it’s a little bigger. That helps.

The Taurus G3C also has memory pads built into the frame that make it feel amazing in the hands.

Both pistols have front serrations, good stippling, an undercut under the trigger guard, and a decent sized beavertail.

I will say that the grip is a little too small to feel great in my hands. A Hogue grip made it perfect though!

Sig P365 with Hogue Grip

When you do a Taurus G3C VS Sig P365 comparison of the stippling, the G3C has much more aggressive stippling. That can be good and bad. It’s good on the range and a little harsh against your skin for concealed carry.

Although the G3C’s stippling is a bit rough, it’s overall ergonomics are a little better than the P365’s. It’d better be better. It’s bigger!

Ergonomics wise, the P365 is closer to a gun like the Hellcat. You can read all about that comparison in our Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365 comparison.

Frame and Controls

The G3C has take down levers very similar to Glock. Pull the tabs down to do a field strip. While it’s easier to field strip than some pistols on the market, it’s not as easy as the P365.

Taurus G3C Laying Next To Sig P365

The P365 has a lever that you flip down to perform a field strip. It’s just plain easier. Sig employed the same system in their P365XL as well. If you’re interested, you can read all about it in our Sig P365XL vs Sig P365 comparison.

The slide release is a little easier to reach if you have small hands.

The Taurus G3C has a standard Picatinny rail while Sig’s P365 has a proprietary rail. So while you can mount almost anything you want on the Taurus, you’re a little more limited with the P365.Yet, most people won’t attach anything to their concealed carry piece.

Plus, Sig has teamed up with Lima, Foxtrot, and Streamlight to give you plenty of attachment offerings.

Both guns are pretty much equal in the Frame and Controls category.

Sights

The sights on the Sig p365 are superior to most other pistols. They’re amazing. The X-Ray3 Day/Night Sights are easy to pick up day or night. The front sight is green and very easy to pick out from the muted black rear sight.

Sig P365 Front Sight

The sights on the Taurus G3C are good too. They just don’t compare to the Sig’s. They are black and muted in the rear. There is also a white dot in the rear.

I can land shots on target fast and accurately with them. They’re very good.

taurus g3c sight picture

Sig edges out the Taurus in this category.

Trigger

Both are good. The Sig is better.

Sig P365 Trigger

The G3C’s trigger is a Double Action/Single Action striker fired trigger. It’s rare. You do get second strike capability but the trigger’s feel is different because of it.It’s a polymer trigger with a safety blade in the middle (similar to Glock’s).

It has a large amount of room before it hit’s “the wall”. After you hit the wall, the break is clean. The reset is short. The follow-up shot’s are short.

Overall, the Taurus’s trigger is good. It just takes a little practice to get used to it.

taurus g3c trigger lever front view

The Sig P365’s trigger is very good. It’s a rounded metal trigger. It feels really good too. The break is great. The reset is great. It’s everything you look for in a concealed carry trigger.

Sig edges out Taurus here.

Safety

Both have internal safeties to keep the gun from firing if it’s dropped.

The G3C has a manual thumb safety. The Sig P365 can be ordered either way. However most people order the Sig without one.

The G3C has a trigger blade safety too. Some people like these extra safeties that Taurus has added and some people don’t.

This category can’t have a winner because these safety differences are subjective to the shooter.

Shooting Impressions

Both of these pistols shoot excellent. They really do. Both are very accurate. Also, both handle recoil very well for their size.

The triggers and sights worked very well on the shooting range to keep the shot groupings nice and tight.

Sig P365 on top of Taurus G3C

These two pistols tied here. Next to reliability, this is probably the most important category.

It’s interesting that the pistols tied in both of the most important categories by which you’d judge a concealed carry pistol.

You’d expect the P365 to shoot similarly to a smaller gun like the Glock 43 rather than a slightly larger gun like the G3C.

By the way, if you want to read about how the Glock 43 vs the Sig P365 comparison plays out, it on our blog as well.

Quality

Sig wins here.

The Taurus is still a good pistol. It’s excellent for $250.
The Sig’s $550 price tag is evident in the quality though.

The attention to details, night sights, Sig’s reputation, and Sig’s expensive branding all add to the cost of the P365.

Sig P365 Grip on top of Taurus G3C

Both pistols are worth the money.

You’ll have to decide if the details that separate the P365 are worth the price.

Either one will make a fine concealed carry companion.

Sig P365 on top of Taurus G3C - grip

taurus g3c scene 3

Taurus G3c Review (With Pictures)

Taurus G3c Review

Can You Trust It For Concealed Carry?

Today we’re looking at the new Taurus G3c and we’re going to answer some very important questions about this budget pistol.

  • Is it reliable?
  • What’s the level of quality?
  • How well does it work for Concealed Carry?
  • How does it compare to other handguns in the segment?

To fully answer the questions we’re asking about this pistol, we need to dive deep into the characteristics and specs of the Taurus G3c.

Highlights

taurus g3c next to taurus pt111 g2

The Taurus G3c is the successor to the popular G2c pistol (which succeeded the PT111 G2). Taurus has sold the G2c and PT111 G2 in droves and there’s no reason to believe the G3c will be any different. 

The G3c comes just two years after the G2c and costs just a touch more. However, it brings extra features (and 3 magazines) to the table in exchange for the slight price increase.

The Taurus G3c is known as a value gun.

Although this pistol (including previous models) is known as a “value gun,” Taurus has a loyal following of customers that are quick to let you know it’s not a cheap gun. These loyal Taurus fans are eager to tell you the pistol is packed with value. 

Many Taurus fans accuse owners of Sig Sauer and Glock pistols of foolishness for paying twice as much for their pistols.

The Taurus G3c is sized right for concealed carry.

taurus g3c camo scene

The Taurus G3c’s size is a bit of an anomaly. It’s a bit larger than most single stack pistols yet smaller than almost any double stack pistol save for the Sig P365 and Springfield Hellcat. Yet, its very svelte frame packs 12 rounds of your favorite 9mm ammo.

Pound for pound, it has one of the best size-to-capacity ratios you’ll find.

Get the right Taurus G3c holster and you’ll have a near perfect concealed carry setup.

Upgrades Over Previous Models

The Taurus G3c is an updated G2c. 

taurus g3c laying next to taurus pt111 g2

The G2c itself was just a barely updated version of the PT111 G2 which Taurus released back in 2013. The PT111 G2 was one of the best selling pistols in the country for years. All three of these pistols are so similar that if you laid them side by side, you’d have a really tough time telling them apart. 

Although the G3c can trace its history back to some earlier “Millennium” pistols from Taurus, we won’t go further back than the PT111 G2 in this very brief history of the handgun. 

You see, the PT111 G2 was so different from previous models that it should really be considered a completely different pistol line from 2013 forward.

The difference between the G2c and PT111 G2 was mostly just the new name. Sure, they changed the logo and some of the roll markings but it wasn’t really an updated version of the PT111 G2. 

taurus g3c in holster red background

However, Taurus finally did away with their internal locking safety system (that nobody used) which utilized a key to render the firearm inoperable. 

It was more or less just a renamed PT111 G2. Re-naming it sure helped with sales though. Taurus G2c was a lot easier to say than PT111 G2. Plus people like buying the latest pistol. Nice trick Taurus.

Taurus’ new G3c has some real upgrades over the G2c though. Let’s look at them:

  • Better sights
  • Better trigger (supposedly)
  • Forward slide serrations
  • Scallops on the mag base plate
  • Tenifer finish (instead of bluing)
  • Teflon-coated controls
  • Comes with three magazines
  • Re-contoured slide (not really an upgrade)
  • Different loaded-chamber indicator

taurus g3c black and white photo

Sights

taurus g3c sight picture

Taurus finally upgraded the sights on this latest version. Taurus installed metal sights on the G3c that are more modern. Many newer pistols have moved away from the type of sights that require you to line up dots. 

More and more gun makers are switching the rear sights over to a more muted black style. Instead of two dots to lineup with the front dot, the G3c’s rear sight is just matte black. It also has serrations to help prevent any possibility of glare. 

This sight system is supposed to make it easier to focus on the front dot. I agree with the decision that Taurus made here. I can line up the front dot easier and faster with the new sights.

There’s more good news here: The new sights are actually Glock pattern sights. It’s very easy to drop off the G3c at your gunsmith and have some better sights installed. 

You’ll have a lot of options because there are a ton of options out there where Glock sights are concerned.

taurus g3c rear sight

taurus g3c front sight

Trigger

While Taurus carried over the same (unique) trigger system from the previous version, it did add a couple of upgrades.

 

The trigger has been upgraded with a wider trigger face and wider safety lever.

The safety lever in the previous version was narrow and uncomfortable. The new safety lever is much wider and less noticeable when pressing the trigger.

The trigger’s curve is a little less pronounced as well. It’s hard to notice unless you stare at it long enough but the trigger is barely straighter.

taurus g3c trigger side view

Another change is the over-travel stop on the trigger. To be honest, I can’t really notice the difference in over-travel between the new trigger with the old one. 

The PT111 G2 trigger doesn’t really have much over-travel to begin with. Perhaps it’s because it breaks so far rearward to begin with.

taurus g3c trigger over-travel stop

The trigger has the same serrations in it that help your finger get a good purchase.

While Taurus’ new trigger does feel more comfortable on the pad of your finger, I can’t really tell any difference between the latest version and the previous version that’s on my PT111 G2. 

That’s not a bad thing though.

It has the same 6-7 pound break. It has the same unique DA/SA striker system. The Double Action trigger pull feels just like squeezing any other Double Action handgun trigger. 

After that, it goes into Single Action mode where it feels just like any other hammer-fired pistol in Single Action mode.

However, you’re not likely to fire the pistol in DA mode very often because the idea is to rack the slide (putting it in SA mode) before you holster it.

taurus g3c in holster diagonal view

The idea behind most striker-fired pistols is that it’s a good thing to have every trigger pull feel the same. It can be difficult to accurately transition from a double action trigger to a single action trigger when shooting fast.

However, most people will carry the G3c with the striker “cocked” into SA mode so there shouldn’t really be any uncomfortable transitions.

This means that the trigger breaks as far back as a hammer-fired pistol with the hammer cocked back. You can’t really call this a bad thing or a good thing. It’s just a different…thing.

As long as you shoot the pistol enough to know where the trigger breaks, your golden.

So how does the trigger handle when you’re actually shooting and analyzing it? Great! This trigger breaks cleanly and has a short reset with an audible reset click.

The lack of over-travel coupled with a short reset makes follow-up shots quick and easy.

I’m going to be completely honest here. 

I can shoot this pistol as fast and accurately as  some of my much more expensive pistols.

taurus g3c trigger safety lever

Once you get used to the trigger, you’ll be more than capable of getting very tight groupings in rapid fire drills.

It’s also worth mentioning that the nature of the DA/SA trigger means you can get second-strike capability if you need it. The double action pull can hit a primer again if it didn’t go off. This is indeed unique in the striker fired pistol category. 

I’m not sure of how useful it is since most people running malfunction drills don’t go for another trigger pull. They just tap and rack to clear the pistol. 

I suppose you could add a trigger pull before your tap and rack routine but that would definitely take a lot of practice to pull off instinctively in a real world scenario if you’ve had a lot of training with a typical tap and rack drill.

Frame and Controls

The Taurus G3c’s shape and ergonomics are almost exactly the same shape as the G2c with a few notable differences.

  • The slide has been reshaped.
  • Slide serrations on front of slide.
  • Scallops for pulling a stuck mag.
  • Tenifer finish instead of bluing.
  • Controls are coated with Teflon

The older versions of this pistol had a long scallop cut out of the top of the slide on both sides. Perhaps it shaved an ounce or so off. Anyway, those scallops are gone now and the front of the slide is a bit blockier.

The slide now has a taller face which gives Taurus a little more space for the forward slide serrations.

taurus g3c front slide serrations

Taurus also added scallops that meet on the bottom of the grip and top of the mag base plate. These allow you to pull a stuck magazine if it doesn’t drop freely.

I think I should add a quick note here about the PT111 G2 that I’ve had since 2014. I have never had a magazine get stuck. 

I’m not saying the scallop was a meaningless addition to the Taurus G3c. I just want to point out that I don’t believe this was added to correct any problems with the previous versions. 

taurus g3c mag scallop

Speaking of magazines, the G3c comes with three of them. That alone justifies the slight increase in the MSRP.

taurus g3c magazines

The G3c has a Tenifer finish instead of standard bluing like my old PT111 G2. This should hold up much better in the long run.

taurus g3c on table

The controls are coated in Teflon. In a practical side by side test, I can’t really tell the difference in actually using them. Perhaps the finish will last longer with the Teflon coated over them.

taurus g3c thumb safety

taurus g3c safety lever

Ergonomics

Taurus hasn’t changed the ergonomics on this pistol line since 2013. 

That is a very good thing. The Taurus G3c feels very good in your hand. 

Here’s what I like about its ergos:

  • Rounded edges
  • Memory pads for trigger finger
  • Flatter, wider trigger
  • Easy to takedown
  • Pinky extension on magazine
  • Forward slide serrations
  • Aggressive stippling
  • High shooting grip

taurus g3c beavertail

taurus g3c stippling

taurus g3c trigger guard notch

taurus g3c stippling side view

taurus g3c mag scallop

taurus g3c front slide serrations

taurus g3c take down lever

taurus g3c memory pad

 

The truth is, the whole topic of ergonomics is a very subjective thing. What might fit my hand incredibly well could feel less than ideal in your hand. The only way to know if you’ll like it is to pick it up and see how it feels in your hand.

I find the ergonomics of the G3c to be very well thought out and executed extremely well. Your mileage may vary.  

taurus g3c in holster overhead view

Reliability

In my opinion, this is where the Taurus G3c really shines. I’ve put a few hundred rounds through it and it appears to be just as reliable as the Taurus PT111 G2 I’ve had for a few years.

I’ve put thousands of rounds through the PT111 G2. I have cleaned it a few times here and there but I certainly have not kept it immaculately clean.

I’ve fired my carry ammo through it. I’ve fired cheap bulk ammo through it. In fact, I’ve fired dozens of different types of ammo through it. 

taurus g3c slide open

I’ve kept count of every single failure. There have been zero. I know that sounds crazy. This is a Taurus. I paid $220 for it. How can it be this reliable?

I think Taurus earned a bad name a while back with some of their earlier Millennium models that were not as reliable.

I haven’t had any problems with any of the Taurus pistols that I own. I know someone who had a problem with a Taurus .38 revolver with a binding cylinder a few years ago. However, I had the same problem with a Ruger SP101. 

I know there are lemons in every manufacture’s lineup. This is especially true when a new pistol is first released. 

Remember Sig’s early P365 pistols or Glock’s early G43 examples? Most people don’t. If they do, they generally dismiss those problems to growing pains and move on.

When a budget pistol has a few growing pains, people tend to remember it longer for some reason.

Because this pistol is really just an upgraded PT111 G2 and not a totally new pistol design, I don’t expect many people to have hiccups with it. I haven’t.

Magazines

The Taurus G3c mags are virtually the same as the previous versions with the exception of the scallop on the base plate.

They have a bright yellow follower that’s easy to see when the slide is locked open.

taurus g3c yellow magazine follower

The G3c accepts 15 and 17 round Mec-Gar mags from the full size G3 as well. I also want to point out that some people on online forums state that Sig P226 mags will also fit (although, I haven’t personally tried).

Safety

This pistol is quite safe. 

It has the trigger lever that we’ve already discussed. It prevents the trigger from being depressed by an object coming in from the side of the gun. It should also keep the trigger from moving backward if it’s dropped.

There is a thumb safety on the frame. It’s small enough that it doesn’t add unnecessary bulk. Yet it’s still easy enough to disengage in a hurry. It’s set up for right handers and is not reversible. 

taurus g3c thumb safety

You can do a quick chamber check by looking in the U-notch for a round. This U-notch replaced the pop-up style loaded-chamber indicator on earlier models.

taurus g3c u-notch

Shooting Impressions

It’s good. It’s very good.

taurus g3c aiming

Sure, I own other pistols that have better triggers and accuracy. Those other pistols dang sure better be more accurate and have better triggers than the Taurus G3c because they cost twice as much money.

The question here isn’t whether the G3c handles as well as pistols costing twice as much money.

The question here is whether the Taurus G3c shoots well enough for concealed carry.

The answer to that question is…oh yes…it does. It shoots very well. Once you get used to the trigger, it handles very well.

Does it shoot accurately enough to use for self-defense? It’s way past that point. It’s very accurate. I can punch a small ragged hole through the target from 20 feet away. 

taurus g3c low ready

Is it reliable? This is the part that surprises some people. The Taurus G3c is very reliable. Remember the story I told earlier in this article about my six year old PT111 G2? I’ve put thousands of rounds through it. I haven’t had a single malfunction with it. 

Is the trigger easy to master? Yes, it is. You just have to get used to the fact that it breaks further back than your other striker-fired guns.

The trigger acts like a traditional Single Action trigger you’d see on a Sig P226 or Beretta 92. Which is to say, pretty good. 

Are the sights easy to see and use? Yes, the sights are easy to use. Granted, they are on the smaller side. However, this is quite common for concealed carry pistols. If you don’t like them, you will like that Taurus uses Glock-style sights that are easy to swap out for sights that you do like.

How does it handle recoil? The Taurus G3c handles recoil very well. It is a smaller pistol so you’ll definitely notice more recoil and muzzle flip than you will on your full size pistol. The G3c handles recoil very similarly to other pistols of this size. I don’t have any trouble lining up quick follow-up shots with this gun.

taurus g3c in hand

Does the G3c shoot well for a sub $300 gun? It shoots very well for the money. If Taurus listed the pistol at $400, I might recommend you pony up the extra money for the Sig P365, Springfield Hellcat, or Glock 43X. But you can pick up the G2c for barely over $300. Once the G3c has been out for a few months, I’m sure it’ll be readily available for well under $250. 

The Taurus shoots very, very well for a $250 gun. 

drawing the taurus g3c from holster

Overall Specs

  • Cartridge: 9mm
  • Capacity: 12 rds.
  • Barrel length: 3.2 inches
  • Overall Length: 6.3 inches
  • Height: 5.1 inches
  • Width: 1.2 inches
  • Weight: 1 lb., 6 oz.
  • Trigger: 5 – 6 lbs.
  • MSRP: $306

Competition

Let’s look at some of the other notable affordable guns on the market.

Sccy CPX-2: I believe that the CPX-2’s trigger really holds it back. I would never recommend it over the G3c. However, the new DVG-1 has striker-fired trigger and the option of a red dot. I haven’t handled that pistol yet so I can’t compare it but it is worth looking at.

Hi-Point: Don’t go here, ok. Just…don’t. If you only have $100 and you just can’t wait the time it’ll take you to save up another $100 then maybe Hi-point is for you. Yes, it’s a gun. I can’t say much past that.

Stoeger STR-9c: This one is just like the G3c; great bang for the buck. I’d definitely check it out.

Ruger Security 9 Compact: This is a great pistol that’s also in a similar price range to the Taurus G3c. The security 9 compact is a really good handgun for the money. It has an internal hammer-fired trigger that is actually pretty good. It should definitely be on your short list with the G3c if you’re looking at pistols in this price range.

Are any of the above guns better than Taurus’s G3c? The short answer is no but the Stoeger and Ruger are definitely on equal footing. 

The point is, you do have a few options in this price range that are of decent quality and reliable.

Taurus G2C: This is the gun which the G3c is based on. They are very similar but you’ll find a better price on the older model. You can get a great Taurus G2C holster right here on our website too.

If you want to compare the G3C to a more expensive (and very popular) concealed carry gun, check out our Taurus G3c vs Sig P365 article. You can also check out our  whole list of the 50 Best Concealed Carry Guns.

Conclusion

  • Is it reliable? – Definitely.
  • What’s the level of quality? – Very Good.
  • How well does it work for Concealed Carry? – Very Well.
  • How does it compare to other handguns in the segment? – Good for the price. Its trigger is a bit different though.

taurus g3c and pt111 g2

I’d say the Taurus G3c is 80% as good as the Sig P365 for 50% of the cost. Is that extra engineering prowess worth a few hundred more dollars? That’s up to you.

The Taurus G3c is way past the point of being good enough for concealed carry. 

taurus g3c side view

In fact, it’s excellent for concealed carry:

  • It’s accurate. 
  • It’s small.
  • It’s lightweight.
  • It shoots very well.
  • It holds 12 rounds of 9mm.

It’s a near perfect concealed carry handgun.

It’s size-to-capacity ratio is only bested by the latest offerings from Sig and Springfield.

If you’re on the fence about buying this handgun, get off the fence and buy it already. 

You can definitely trust it for concealed carry.

taurus g3c in holster and mags

taurus g3c stippling

taurus g3c stippling close up

Ban Spoons

If we don’t stand up to the Pro-Spoon lobby, who will?

We Need To Ban Spoons.

Not All Spoons…Just The Bad Ones.

 

We’re sick and tired of the pro-spoon lobby getting their way in this country.

Every year over 300,000 Americans die from obesity-related deaths according to the CDC.

We’re calling for COMMON SENSE Spoon Control legislation in America….It’s time.

If we can save just one life from obesity, it’ll be worth it.

 

Get your rights back and checkout the best pistols you can own now with out OWB Holster.

Best Concealed Carry Handguns

The 50 Best Concealed Carry Guns in 2021 (with pictures)

Best Concealed Carry Guns 2021

Why Are These The Best Concealed Carry Guns of 2021?

These are the hottest selling and best concealed carry guns on the market. Tens of thousands of our customers have collectively chosen these pistols over all the other concealed carry handguns available on the market. These are the best concealed carry guns for which we see the most Kydex holsters ordered at Clinger Holsters.

There are plenty of amazing pistols that are not on this gun list. That doesn’t mean they aren’t great. It just means we only included the most commonly used and popular concealed carry guns in this list. After all, we only have room for 50 of them!

This “Best Concealed Carry Guns” list contains some of the best pistols and handguns for concealed carry from the best gun/pistol brands out there.

However, I can only fit so many pistols in a blog post. Fifty of the best concealed carry guns is my limit. You’ll be pleased to see that there are quite a few American-made hand guns listed here too. Also, people have mostly gravitated toward 9mm handguns so that’s mostly what you’ll find here. However, there are a few other worthy calibers represented here as well.

Please try not to hurt my feelings too badly in the comments section if you don’t see your favorite pistol on this list of best concealed carry guns. Otherwise, have fun exploring the best concealed carry guns on the market (we’ve included lots of gun pictures for you).

Best Concealed Carry Guns: Big And Small (Best Guns)

You’ll notice way more small guns on this list than big guns. Yet, you’ll see a few larger guns here.

This is a good time to point out that you can Conceal Carry larger handguns if you try. Yes, you will have to dress a little differently when concealing a Glock 19 or Walther PPQ than you would with a small handgun.

However, big guns shoot better and the biggest pistols hold more bullets. It’s worth giving them a try.

That being said, smaller guns are comfortable to wear every day with less effort (especially if you prefer appendix carry). That’s exactly why this list is mostly comprised of smaller handguns. They are far more popular for Concealed Carry for a reason.

The funny thing about handgun sizes is there is no official sizing chart. Everybody uses their own terminology so that’s exactly what we’ll do here.

I’ve divided this article into four main sections: Mouse handguns, Slim Subcompact handguns, Compact handguns, and FullSize handguns.

So there are 50 best concealed carry guns in this list. They’re just divided up into four main handgun size categories.


Best Concealed Carry Guns: Best Mouse Handguns (Top Guns)

Ruger LCP MAX

Ruger LCP MAX - best concealed carry pistol for pocket carry

This is the next evolution of Ruger’s ever popular LCP line, and boy oh boy is this one exciting! It holds up to 12 rounds of .380 ACP. That’s insane. The LCP is  usually the smallest pistol you’ll see in any list of the best Concealed Carry guns. It’s a true mouse gun. Only now it’s holds enough ammo to compete with the big boys.

To have a pocket pistol with twice the ammo of a j-frame? This was unthinkable until Ruger actually did it. The LCP Max fits in the palm of your hand while managing to pack the punch of twelve .380 ACP rounds.

The .380 ACP isn’t incredibly powerful but it’s more powerful than it used to be. New .380 ACP ammo is showing some promising improvements in stopping power. Many people trust a little .380 for self-defense & many people have successfully used the .380 for self-defense.

The LCP MAX has already proven to be a very reliable and high quality handgun right out of the gate. It has a good trigger and good sights. Now, that’s rare in a mouse gun.

The LCP MAX is so easy to conceal that you’ll never have to leave the house without having some sort of firearm with you. Even if it’s not as powerful as a 9mm.

If you are looking for tiny pistol, then you might want to consider this hand gun.

Ruger LCP MAX Holsters

Caliber: 380ACP
Capacity: 10+1 (12+1 with extended magazine)
Weight: 10.6 oz
Barrel Length: 2.80”
Cost: $389


Sig P938

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig P938 Holsters

The Sig P938 feels like a high quality handgun as soon as you pick it up. It’s not hard to see why this is one of the best concealed carry handguns on the market. Sig Sauer has engineered a masterpiece here. This is a high pedigree pistol and it’s price reflects that. But we all know that quality doesn’t come cheap.

The Sig P938 was introduced by Sig Sauer to offer a slightly bigger version of the P238 to support the 9mm cartridge. It has the same great trigger and a metal frame. It’s ergonomics and balance feel good in the hand. Although it’s very small for a 9mm, the extra weight makes shooting it a little easier than small polymer guns (like the LCP MAX).

Sig P938 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6+1
Weight: 16 oz
Barrel Length: 3”
Cost: $599


Springfield 911

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Springfield 911 .380

Some people say that Springfield copied the Sig P238 with this pistol. However, that is not an accurate statement. In reality, Sig’s P238 was Sig’s version of the Colt Mustang (the Mustang itself is a miniature version of the venerable 1911).

I think that each version gets better. The Springfield 911 is just as sweet as the Sig P238. Yet, it’s a bit thinner and lighter.

Also, it’s trigger is a bit better. Once the safety of flicked off, a smooth 5-pound pull releases the hammer.

A sweet trigger is a great feature when you’re searching for the best concealed carry guns.

Plus, it comes with night sights, a G10 trigger shoe, G10 mainspring housing, and G10 grips. It’s truly a top-shelf pistol.

Now, the 911 is available in both .380 and 9mm. The 9mm version is just a tad bigger and is about the same dimensions as Sig’s P938.

Additionally, the 911 is now available in a version dubbed 911 Alpha that ditches the G10 for a smaller price tag. It shoots just as sweet but is a bit more affordable.

Springfield 911 Holsters

Caliber: 380 ACP, 9mm
Capacity: 6-7+1
Weight: 12.6 for .380 version – 15.3 oz for 9mm version
Barrel Length: 2.7 – 3.0 inches (depending on .380 vs 9mm)
Cost: $399-599


Kimber Micro 9

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Kimber Micro 9 Holsters

Kimber’s Micro 9 is very similar to Sig’s P938. They’re both 9mm versions of Colt’s Mustang. However, the Micro 9 is more reliable than the Mustang ever hoped to be. It’s a very practical daily carry pistol. You can think of Kimber’s Micro 9 as a very small 1911 pistol. After all, it shares the same basic design. 

The Micro 9 is a single action only pistol. That means that the hammer must be cocked back to take the first shot. All other shots will cock the hammer for you. That’s why single action pistols are usually carried “cocked and locked”.

One thing’s for sure. The trigger is buttery smooth and very light. Surely, the Micro 9 handles way better than its diminutive size should allow. It’s like it defies physics. You have to shoot it to believe it.

It’s an incredible shooter and is a very small Concealed Carry handgun. Therefore, it’s easy to see why Kimber sells so many Micro 9 pistols.

Kimber Micro 9 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6-7+1
Weight:  15.6 oz
Barrel Length: 3.15
Cost: $550


Best Concealed Carry Guns: Best Slim Subcompact Handguns (Top Guns)

Sig P365

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig P365 Holsters

Sig changed the rules of the game when they released the P365 at SHOT Show in 2018. They caught everyone off guard. This little pistol is smaller than many Single Stack pistols on the market. Yet, it holds 10+1 rounds of 9mm rather than the usual 6+1 or 7+1 rounds. The optional extended mag adds two more rounds for a total of 12+1.

Sig tapered the top of the magazine a little differently and thinned out the walls of the frame’s grip to pull off this miracle. Also, the P365 comes standard with night sights and  great trigger.

Now consider that everyone loves how this pistol shoots. It’s a winner in every category for the best concealed carry guns. If you want a pistol that will rock your socks off and carry up to 13 rounds of 9mm, check out the Sig P365.

If you demand those requirements in an unrealistically small package, the Sig P365 is one of the best concealed carry 9mm pistols for a reason.

This pistol isn’t just popular with men either. It’s been a very popular handgun for women in 2021 due to its smaller size.

Sig P365 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-12+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 3.1 inches
Cost: $500


Sig P365X

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig P365X Holsters

Now, we know what the Sig P365 did for concealed carry. It ushered in the high-capacity micro-compact pistol category.

This is the first follow up. Meet the Sig P365X. Sig upgraded the original P365 in some key ways to create this new unicorn. It basically helps you shoot faster and more accurately.

The top of the slide has been milled out to accept red dot optics. It pairs perfectly with Sig’s own RomeoZero red dot sight. A red dot sight has proven itself as a worthy addition to a concealed carry pistol. It helps you get on target faster while keeping focus on the target itself.

The smaller sized red dots out there (like the RomeoZero) fit perfectly on this slim handgun.

The Sig P365X also has some of the features that Sig added to the P365XL because they both share the same XSeries grip module. In fact, you can think of the P365X as a P365XL with the shorter slide and barrel from the P365.

You’ll notice that the Sig P365X has a flat trigger and a longer beavertail. Both of these features help you shoot more accurately and with better control.

Plus, the longer XSeries grip module holds a standard 12-round magazine instead of the 10-rounder from the original P365. This longer grip allows you to reload magazines without pinching your hand during reloads.

This pistol is the new gold standard. 

Honestly, it’s probably the overall best concealed carry handgun on the market right now. Sig has set the bar extremely high with this handgun and everyone else will be judged based on how they stack up to it.

If I was limited to only one pistol (I know…that would really suck), this would be that pistol. Of course, I would also opt for the optional 15 round mag too!

It’s good juju.

Sig P365X Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-12+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 3.1 inches
Cost: $599


Sig P365 XL

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig P365 XL Holsters

Sig upgraded the Sig P365 to create the Sig P365 XL not long after releasing the P365. This version has a 12 round mag. That makes the grip is as tall as the original version was with the extended mag. This helps with reloads. Plus, the trigger is upgraded to a X-Series flat trigger.

Plus, Sig extended the barrel 0.6 inches longer. That’ll give you a longer sight radius and more accuracy (theoretically).

Sig also extended the beavertail and it feels much better than the original Sig P365. Sig also cut the slide for you to install a Red Dot. They even developed a slimmer RomeoZero Red Dot that fits it perfectly.

It’s a little more expensive than the original but well worth it as one of the best concealed carry guns.

This is basically a longer-barrel version of the Sig P365X. If you like the Sig P365X but prefer a little more barrel length, this P365XL the perfect concealed carry handgun for you. That longer barrel will help with muzzle flip during rapid fire shooting. It’ll also add a few more feet/sec to your rounds.

Sig P365 XL Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 12+1
Weight: 20 oz
Barrel Length: 3.7 inches
Cost: $579


Glock 43X

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 43X Holsters

Glock took their best-selling Glock 43 and added 4 rounds to it. That’s pretty much the Glock 43X in a nutshell. This upped the ammo count from 6 to 10. While the grip is longer, it’s not that much longer than the original Glock 43 if you had the pinky rest on it. The Glock 43X’s frame is technically a couple of millimeters wider as well. However, you would have to look very hard to notice that tiny difference.

The bottom line is this: Sig created a near perfect concealed carry handgun when they debuted the P365. This was Glock’s answer.

So for all you Glock fans who were swayed (or almost swayed) over to Sig’s corner, Glock gave you a thin 10 round Glock that’s easy to conceal carry.

The grip fills your whole hand. Couple that grip with a short barrel and you have a very well balanced firearm.

Glock 43X Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 16 oz
Barrel Length: 3.41 inches
Cost:$459


Glock 43X MOS

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 43X

Glock one-upped themselves with the 43X MOS. This is just a Glock 43X with two main differences. First (and most important), it has a slide cut that allows you to mount a red dot. Second, it has a proprietary Glock accessory rail. This is handy if you want to mount a flashlight.

If you won’t use a red dot or the accessory rail on this pistol, you’re better off getting the original Glock 43X. It’ll save you over $100.

If there’s a chance you might want to add a red dot to your gun, this is the best concealed carry handgun for you Glock fans. It’s slim, has a decent capacity, and has Glock’s legendary reliability.

Oh yeah, there’s a company called Shield Arms that makes 15 round mags for the 43X that are about the same size as the Glock mags. They’re pretty reliable too.

Glock 43X MOS Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 16 oz
Barrel Length: 3.41 inches
Cost:$599


Glock 48

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 48 Holsters

The Glock 48 shares the same platform as the Glock 43X. The only difference is the longer barrel. While the Glock 43X is a short 3.41 inches, the Glock 48’s barrel has a length of 4.17 inches. That’s still quite manageable. Plus it weighs just two ounces more than its little brother.

You can also think of the Glock 48 as a Single Stack Glock 19. Truth be told, Glock fans have asked for this pistol for many years. That longer barrel increases muzzle velocity and reduces felt recoil simultaneously.

The Glock 48 is a great Concealed Carry pistol that feels and shoots sort of like a service pistol. You can get a full grip on this handgun no matter how big your hands are. Yet, its slim width makes concealed carry a breeze.

Glock 48 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 4.17 inches
Cost: $459


Glock 48 MOS

Glock 48 MOS with Red Dot

The Glock 48 MOS is just a Glock 48 with an accessory rail and red dot cutout on the slide. Choose this over the standard Glock 48 if there’s even a slight chance you’ll add a red dot (or light) to your Glock down the road. That option will cost you over $100 though. So, if you’re 100% sure you don’t need those features, you can stick with the Glock 48 (one of the most popular and reliable concealed carry handguns available).

Don’t forget about the 15 round mag from Shield Arms that will bump up the ammo count for you. The best part is, it’s the same size as the original Glock mag for the Glock 48 MOS.

Glock 48 MOS Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 4.17 inches
Cost: $599


Glock 43

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 43 Holsters

The Glock 43 is a blockbuster for good reason. The G43 is one of the smallest 9mm and lightest 9mm pistols on the market. Also, it’s incredibly thin.

Its grip is short enough to allow pocket carry. However, it shines in a good IWB holster (Inside the Waistband). In a good holster, this Glock subcompact 9mm is small enough to completely disappear.

Plus, it has the reliability and functionality that Glock fans depend on. This is the smallest Glock if you don’t count the Glock 42 (380). If you demand a Glock for concealed carry and want an incredibly small pistol, the Glock 43 is definitely for you. There are only two real drawbacks to the G43. First, is the limited ammo count. It only holds 7 rounds of 9mm. Secondly, people with big hands have commented that it’s hard to get a good grip on the Glock 43.

If you want the best all around Glock for concealed carry, look at the Glock 43X. If you want the smallest Glock 9mm (easier for concealment) the Glock 43 may be exactly what you need.

Glock 43 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 3.4”
Cost: $450


Ruger MAX-9

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger MAX-9 Holsters

Ruger jumped on the high-capacity, micro-compact bandwagon! This is Ruger’s answer to the Sig P365. The Ruger MAX-9 is one of the best bang-for-the-buck concealed carry pistols you can find right now.

Ruger is generally known for 2 things in the gun community. First, they make rugged, reliable guns. Second, they price them very competitively.

Ruger uses good old fashioned American labor and know-how to produce world class firearms at great prices. Sure you can find better prices on handguns that are made in South America or Turkey, but those cheaper guns don’t have Ruger’s reputation.

Let’s talk about the MAX-9. This is one sweet shooter. It’s lightweight, well-balanced, and easy to conceal.

The MAX-9 has great sights on it too. You can see what I mean in the picture above. Look at that front sight. It has fiber optics and tritium in it. You simply can’t ask for a better front sight. Look at the rear sight and you’ll notice it’s tall enough to co-witness through a red dot. The rear sight is a great example of what a rear sight should be. It’s blacked out to allow better focus on the front sight. The squared of ‘U’ shape allows the front sight to easily fall into its domain.

There’s a very easy-to-flick thumb safety as well.

All in all, this is an amazing pistol. When you factor in the affordability of what Ruger is offering, this is a steal.

Ruger MAX-9 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 12+1
Weight: 18.4 oz
Barrel Length: 3.20”
Cost: $399


Springfield Armory Hellcat

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Springfield Hellcat

The Hellcat is the first real competition to the blockbuster Sig P365. The Hellcat’s flush magazine squeezes 11 rounds in the pistol compared to Sig’s 10. The extended mag holds 13 to Sig’s 12. A difference of one round won’t convince many shooters to consider the Hellcat over the P365 unless it shines in all the areas that the P365 does.

Well guess what? The Hellcat won’t disappoint. It is phenomenal. Will it sell as well as the Sig? Who knows. However, we can tell you that we are shipping out huge numbers of holsters for the Hellcat. As of right now, it’s almost as popular as the P365. That’s very impressive considering the P365 has been around long enough to have a great reputation and market dominance. Best of all, it’s about the smallest 9mm pistol on the market that holds 13 rounds.

The Hellcat trigger is great. The break is a little crisper than the P365’s but it’s barely noticeable. The stippling works at least as well and maybe better than Sig’s.

We can’t say if the Hellcat outshines the P365. It’s so close that you’ll have to make up your own mind. But the Hellcat has a bright future. This pistol is everything the XD ever wanted to be but in a slimmer, lighter package. The Hellcat’s weight is 18 oz which is about equal to the Sig P365. It’s about time that Springfield started shaving the weight off their pistols. The XD line was always heavier than its peers and Springfield is finally wising up to what concealed carriers want in a carry pistol.

Springfield’s Hellcat is the whole package. It’s slim, lightweight, and easy to carry. It doesn’t hurt that it’s a 9mm pistol that holds 14 rounds!

Take a good hard look at the Hellcat if you’re shopping for the best concealed carry gun for your everyday carry. It won’t disappoint.

 

Springfield Hellcat Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 11-13+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 3”
Cost: $499


Springfield Armory Hellcat OSP

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Springfield Hellcat OSP

This is the OSP version of Springfield’s Hellcat. It has a slide cut to allow a red dot optic to mount on the top.

This pistol is everything the Hellcat is but better. That one simple addition makes this pistol much more accurate during rapid fire. If you haven’t jumped on board the red dot revolution yet, you’re definitely missing out.

A good red dot like the Shield RMSc (in the picture above) allows you to send rounds down range while focusing on the target rather than the front sight. This is a game changer.

When you focus on the front sight, the target blurs out. With a red dot on your Hellcat, you focus on the target and the red dot floats over the target. You never lose sight of where your shooting!

It costs a little more than the standard Hellcat and you’ll drop a couple hundred on a good optic. In the end though, you’ll have a high quality, very capable concealed carry pistol.

 

Springfield Hellcat OSP Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 11-13+1
Weight: 18 oz
Barrel Length: 3”
Cost: $549


Springfield Armory Hellcat RDP

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Springfield Hellcat RDP

Meet the Springfield Hellcat RDP! This gun may look like it belongs with a member of a S.W.A.T. team or maybe even a S.E.A.L. team. However, I assure you, it belongs in a concealed carry loadout.

This pistol obviously brings everything the original Hellcat brings to the table: lightweight, slim package, 14 rounds of 9mm, good trigger, and overall great handling.

There are, however, two very important ingredients added to this magic recipe that we need to examine: a Hex Wasp red dot optic and a compensator.

The Hex Wasp is a good quality optic with a 3.5 MOA red dot floating in your sight picture. That’s makes that little red dot small enough to be accurate, yet still big enough to find easily.

The compensator directs spent gas from the cartridge up and to the sides as it leaves the muzzle. This helps control muzzle flip. Because there’s less muzzle flip, you can get back on target faster.

After all, RDP stands for Rapid Defense Package. You’ll definitely get more shots on target faster with a compensator and red dot to help you out.

Oh, and don’t worry about the extra length that the compensator adds to the package: It’s still easy to conceal. Barrel length doesn’t affect concealment as much as the pistol grip does.

While this isn’t a traditional concealment pistol, it’s definitely a good one. It costs a couple hundred dollars more than a standard Hellcat but remember that it comes with a red dot (good ones like this usually cost a couple hundred) and a compensator right out of the box.

One last thing. Springfield says that they’ve changed out the trigger group to their new Gen 2 version for the Hellcat. So this version of the Hellcat also has an even better trigger than the original one (which was already quite good).

Springfield Hellcat RDP Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 11-13+1
Weight: 19.3 oz
Barrel Length: 3.8” (with compensator)
Cost: $799


S&W M&P Shield Plus 3.1″

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - S&W M&P Shield Plus 3.1"

Smith and Wesson has sold millions of Shield pistols. They’re small, reliable and extremely comfortable in the hand. Then S&W released the M2.0 version. It was an updated version of the original with some key upgrades. Then they released this.

The Shield Plus is in a whole other category of awesomeness. It’s not just an upgraded Shield. Sometimes in life, the sum of the parts add up to more than you could ever expect them to. That’s what has happened here. The S&W M&P Shield Plus 3.1″ pistol combines everything S&W knows about making a great pistol into a concealed carry handgun.

Of course, they managed to cram a whole lot more 9mm rounds into it. However, the “Plus” part of the name doesn’t stop at more ammo. They’ve also updated the trigger. You can see in the picture above that it has a nice flat face to it. Believe it or not that really helps you shoot more accurately.

The trigger is great, the sights are great, and the stippling is great.

Let’s talk about what makes this pistol really great though: ergonomics. The grip is rounded off to fit your hand perfectly. The stippling lets you get a good grip without being overly harsh on your skin. The grip angle (18 degrees) is downright perfect for instinctive aiming.

Plus, now that the magazine holds 13 rounds, the balance is perfect. That’s something about a 3″ barrel with a double stack magazine that just feels good in the hand.

Try this one out. It’s hard to find a fault with it.

S&W M&P Shield Plus 3.1″ Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-13+1
Weight: 20.2 oz
Barrel Length: 3.1”
Cost: $439


S&W Performance Center M&P Shield Plus 4″

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - S&W Performance Center M&P Shield Plus 4"

This is a Performance Center Version of the Shield Plus. It adds an extra inch of barrel and a red dot. Plus Smith and Wesson’s Performance Center has tuned the action. That extra barrel length helps reduce muzzle flip and also helps the 9mm rounds gain a little more velocity on their way out of the barrel.

S&W M&P Shield Plus 4″ Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-13+1
Weight: 22.6 oz
Barrel Length: 4”
Cost: $799


S&W M&P Shield M2.0

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - S&W Shield M&P M2.0

Smith and Wesson knocked it out of the park with the original M&P Shield. They outsold nearly every other Concealed Carry handgun on the market. Well, now S&W has the M&P Shield M2.0 available. They took a great gun and made it incredible.

Why’s it better? The M2.0 version has an incredible trigger. You see, the first version just ok. While the original Shield had amazing ergonomics, it didn’t have great stippling. The Shield M2.0 has amazing stippling. It gives you a good grip on the firearm during rapid fire.

This pistol is small yet ergonomic. Plus, it holds 8+1 rounds of 9mm with the extended magazine. It has good sights too. Best of all, it’s as reliable as the day is long. This pistol has Smith and Wesson’s stellar reputation backing it up.

S&W M&P Shield M2.0 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 7-8+1
Weight: 18.3 oz
Barrel Length: 3.1”
Cost: $339


S&W M&P9 Shield EZ

Best Concealed Carry Handguns -S&W M&P9 Shield EZ

While this is a newer version of the Shield, it’s quite different. This pistol’s name indicated the biggest difference: it’s just plain easy to use.

It’s easy to rack, easy to shoot, and easy to load. It takes very little effort to rack the slide. It’s simply amazing how easy it is to rack.

Also, the M&P9 Shield EZ is easy to load because of the magazine design. It has thumb depressor on the side of the mag that you’ve likely seen on .22lr pistols.

The grip safety even makes safety easy. Because it’s passive, all you have to do to disengage the grip safety is grip the pistol.

This pistol isn’t just for women or the elderly with weak hands. No, it’s one of the best concealed carry guns for anyone who wants a great shooting pistol with a great trigger. Its only downside is the “limited”  ammo capacity of 9 rounds.

S&W added the other fan-favorite features from it’s Shield line too. It comes with a great trigger, perfect stippling, and an 18 degree grip angle for instinctive aiming.

S&W M&P9 Shield EZ Holsters

Caliber: 9mnm
Capacity: 8+1
Weight: 23 oz
Barrel Length: 3.675 inches
Cost: $389


S&W M&P380 Shield EZ

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - S&W Shield 380 EZ Holsters

This is another M&P Shield EZ but setup to fire the .380 ACP cartridge. Why would anyone choose the .380 version over the 9mm?

It’s easier to shoot accurately when you’re sending rounds down range quickly. Because it has less recoil energy pushing against the gun, you can get the sights back on target faster.

Some people just plain prefer softer shooting pistols. Is this pistol a good concealed carry gun though? You betcha it is.

New bullet technology has proven that the 380 cartridge is perfectly suitable for self-defense. It’s no longer a debate. Sure a 45 ACP or 9mm will have better statistics on paper but consider this: the FBI tested the newer .380 cartridges available and found that they passed their ballistic gel test with flying colors. It penetrated more than 12″ but less than 18″ (this is preferred) and it opened up into a bigger mushroom shape quite reliably.

So, if you want the statistically better round, you can pick up the 9mm version of this Shield EZ. If you want the easier to shoot and pistol, pick up the S&W M&P380 Shield EZ.

S&W M&P380 Shield EZ Holsters

Caliber: .380 ACP
Capacity: 8+1
Weight: 18.5 oz
Barrel Length: 3.675 inches
Cost: $309


Taurus GX4

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Taurus GX4 Holsters

The Taurus GX4 is in direct competition with the other high-capacity, micro-compact pistols on this list. The GX4 is very small for what it is. It’s a 9mm pistol that holds 12 rounds and shoots very well. When you consider how affordable it is, you have a concealed carry pistol that’s flying off the shelves.

Taurus has been making very good pistols for quite a while now. They’ve always priced their handguns competitively and the GX4 is no exception. This is the most affordable high-capacity, micro-compact on this list. If you want another pistol at this price, it’ll either be bigger& heavier or it’ll carry less rounds.

There’s a lot going for this little pistol other than the great price. It has near-perfect ergonomics and very good stippling. The front serrations help those who like to do their press checks from the front of the slide. Finally, the flat trigger feels amazing at the firing range.

Taurus produced a great pistol for concealed carry and they offered it at an unbeatable price. Check this one out.

Taurus GX4 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 11+1
Weight: 18.5 oz
Barrel Length: 3.06”
Cost: $329


Ruger EC9s

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger EC9s Holsters

Ruger created the EC9s before the double stack micro-compact pistols became all the rage. It’s still a good concealed carry gun. However, like the Glock 43, it doesn’t carry many rounds. What it does have going for it, however, is a very small & lightweight package that conceals effortlessly.

The Ruger EC9s is pretty much the same pistol as the LC9, LC9s, and LC380. The all look the same and will all fit the same Ruger EC9s holsters.

Here’s how Ruger markets this thing (in a nut shell): It’s a good, reliable pistol (with Ruger’s reputation backing it) for just a little over a couple hundred bucks.

I mean think about it. The EC9s is one of the absolute cheapest guns on this list…. and it’s a good gun. Ruger has a good reputation for building rugged and reliable firearms. They mean it when they state that fact too.

This gun won’t let you down and it’s a fairly decent shooter. It’s small enough to never worry about concealment. It’ll conceal great. Plus, look at the price on these things!

If you can live with just 8 rounds of 9mm in your concealed carry gun, this is the best bang for your buck on this entire list of the 50 Best Concealed Carry Guns.

Ruger EC9sHolsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 7+1
Weight: 17.2 oz
Barrel Length: 3.12”
Cost: $259


Walther PPS M2

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Walther PPS M2 Holsters

Here’s another year with the PPS M2 on our list of best handguns. It’s still a great 9mm for concealed carry. I imagine it’ll stay here until the M3 comes along. There’s simply too much to love about the PPS M2 for it to fall out of popularity with Concealed Carriers.

First, it has Walther’s unmatched fit and finishes. All you have to do is pick this sweet pistol up and you’ll immediately notice its incredible quality. It just oozes quality all over the place.

Next, you’ll be floored by the sweet ergonomics. You’ll swear your hand and this pistol was designed together in the same engineering lab.

Lastly, this little heater is a reliable tack driver on the range. It comes with a flush-fitting magazine and an extended mag as well.

The limited ammo capacity is a bit of a drawback but it’s still a great gun for concealed carry from a company with tons of high pedigree pistols in its history.

Walter PPS M2 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6-8+1
Weight: 21.1 oz
Barrel Length: 3.18”
Cost: $299


Mossberg MC1sc

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Mossberg MC1sc Holsters

Mossberg shocked everyone when they released a concealed carry pistol. They’re in the long gun business right? Well… now they’re in the short gun business too. Mossberg has most assuredly shown the world that they know how to build a great handgun.

The MC1sc is a great shooting 9mm pistol. It has tons of features that modern pistols are equipped with nowadays: front slide serration, flat trigger, aggressive stippling, reversible mag release, and good sights. Oh yeah, it’s proven to be quite reliable too. The price is pretty good too.

This gun does have an obvious deficiency though. Its capacity is only 7-8 rounds depending on whether or not you’re using the extended mag. Ever since the Sig P365 came along, all the other gun manufactures have been scrambling to squeeze a double stack magazine into a gun that’s less than an inch thick.

Mossberg’s new to the pistol game but this is a great entry. I’m sure they’ll release a concealed carry pistol with a better ammo capacity soon. In the meantime, this is a perfectly functional pistol for a great price from an amazing company.

Mossberg MC1sc Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6-7+1
Weight: 19 oz
Barrel Length: 3.4”
Cost: $329


Walther PPK/S

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Walther PPK Holsters

Here’s the classic that refuses to die. The Walther PPK has been James Bond’s Go-To Gun for decades now. It is most definitely small enough to conceal easily. It shoots very well and doesn’t kick bad either. Equally as important, its accuracy is touted by many.

Another great quality of the PPK/S is its amazing balance due to its metal frame.

Simply put, this classic pistol rocks. And as old as its design is, it still works for today’s Concealed Carrier. It doesn’t hold as many rounds as the new guns and it isn’t as light. It is still a viable concealed carry gun though.

Here’s one more bonus: As of 2019, the PPK and PPK/S are being made in the USA.

Walther PPK/S Holsters

Caliber: 380 ACP
Capacity: 6-7+1
Weight: 22.1 oz
Barrel Length: 3.3”
Cost: $625


Bersa Thunder 380

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Bersa Thunder 380 Holsters

This is Bersa’s version of the Walther PPK.  It’s a budget-friendly gun made in Argentina. I can point out a few disadvantages to this gun but I personally believe it’s advantages outweigh them.

Sure, it’s a 380 pistol that weighs more than the P365 and carries less rounds.

But look at what it has going for it: It’s small, cheap, and reliable. I’ve had one of these for years. Through hundreds of rounds, it’s never had a failure. Whenever I fly somewhere, I take this pistol because I cringe at the thought of bag-checking a $700 gun. If a $250 gun gets lost, I can replace it much easier.

Bersa Thunder 380 Holsters

Caliber: 380 ACP
Capacity: 7-8+1
Weight: 20 oz
Barrel Length: 3.5”
Cost: $269


Springfield XDE

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Springfield XDE Holsters

The Springfield XDE is a little bigger than the Springfield XDS. It holds one more round too. The biggest difference is, of course, the hammer instead of a striker. Many shooters prefer and love hammer-fired pistols. The other difference is that the grip safety is gone. It’s been replaced with the manual safety (which doubles as decocker). The XDE shares the same Grip Zone design as the Mod.2 pistols. In fact, from the side, it looks like a Mod.2 with a hammer.

The original XDE came in a 3.3-inch barrel. Now, it can be had in two additional lengths. Therefore, you can choose to carry an XDE with a 3.3 inch, 3.8 inch, or 4.5-inch barrel. Because the grip is the same size on all three models, they are all easy enough to conceal. While the longer-barreled versions aren’t harder to hide they might be a little less comfortable to conceal. But the trade-off for the longer barrel is less muzzle flip and a faster-flying bullet.

The XDE comes with a flush-fitting 8 round mag, an 8 round mag with a pinky extension, and a 9 round extended mag that fits the grip perfectly with the included sleeve.

Springfield XDE Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 8-9+1
Weight: 23 oz
Barrel Length: 3.3”
Cost: $400


1911

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Colt 1911 Defender 3 Inch Holsters

The greatest military the world has ever seen carried the 1911 for several decades until the mid-1980s. It has the proven stopping power of the 45 ACP cartridge.

It’s also a fairly thin handgun which makes it one of the best concealed carry guns. Just know that you’ll very likely either love or hate its manual of arms. It’s generally carried “Cocked & Locked”. Meaning, you’ll draw it from the holster, drop the safety, and find a sweet hair trigger waiting to be pressed. This is one of the most popular guns out there and some consider it to be the most reliable handguns available.

Although the 5” barreled versions can be heavy, the 3” Defender series pistols are a bit lighter.

1911 Holsters

Caliber: Take your pick
Capacity: 6-10+1 depending on caliber and brand
Weight: 24-35 oz depending on build and handgun brands
Barrel Length: 3”- 5”
Cost: From $400 all the way up to many thousands of dollars (depending on the brand)


Best Concealed Carry Guns: Best Compact Handguns (Top Guns)

 

Walther PPQ Subcompact

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Walther PPQ Subcompact Holsters

It took Walther a few years but they’ve finally shortened the PPQ into a chopped version for us Concealed Carriers. The PPQ Subcompact shares the same great ergonomics and trigger that the PPQ is known for. However, the grip and barrel have been shortened enough to make this into a more manageable Concealed Carry handgun.

Walther also includes a 15 round extended mag with a  matching sleeve that perfectly matches the pistol. This is one of the highest quality subcompact double-stack pistols on the market. It has fast become extremely popular.

This pistol is easy to conceal and shoots incredibly well.

Walther PPQ Subcompact Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-15+1
Weight: 21.2 oz
Barrel Length: 3.5 inches
Cost: $550


Canik TP9 Elite SC

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Canik TP9 Elite SC Holsters

The Canik TP9 Elite SC comes from a company that’s not extremely well known. However, there is a big following behind this handgun. It’s extremely popular and gaining more popularity every day. It’s a compact concealed carry handgun that shoots extremely well. It holds 12 rounds of 9mm but many owners of the TP9 Elite SC opt to carry the optional 15 round mag.

This pistol has a nice trigger, great sights, handling ergonomics, and reliability. It’s no wonder it’s become so popular. I’m sure the great price had something to do with it’s rise as well.

Canik TP9 SC Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 12+1
Weight: 24.8 oz
Barrel Length: 3.60”
Cost: $369


Glock 26 Gen 5

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 26 Holsters

The Glock 26 has been a great selling Concealed Carry gun for years now. The fifth-generation makes the G26 even sweeter. The Gen 5 updates include a better trigger and more accurate barrel. The Glock 26 has a 10+1 capacity. While the Glock 43X holds just as many rounds as the Glock 26, they approach Concealed Carry a little differently.

The Glock 43X is very thin. However, the Glock 26 makes up for its thicker frame with a shorter height. The Glock 26 is one of the shortest 9mm handguns on the market.

The Gen 5 revamp has ensured that the Glock 26 isn’t going anywhere for a while.

Glock 26 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 21.69 oz
Barrel Length: 3.43”
Cost: $550


Ruger Security 9 Compact

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger Security 9 Compact Holsters

While Ruger built the Security 9 as a direct competitor to the Glock 19, this was their answer to the Glock 26.

Like it’s big brother (the Security 9), the Security 9 Compact’s “claim to fame” is its price tag.

It’s may be affordable but it’s not a cheap gun. This handgun is a good quality firearm without even considering the price tag.  When you factor in the price tag, it’s a great product that Ruger has blessed us Americans with!

Ruger claims to build “rugged” firearms. Their guns are supposed to be tougher than normal and last long enough to pass down to your grandchildren. The Security 9 Compact is no exception. It’s very reliable and well-built.

Ruger dropped a hammer-fired trigger into this pistol instead of the more common striker-fired style. However, it feels mostly like a decent striker-fired trigger. Is the trigger on this gun as good as the G26? No, but it’s close. The price tag was the trade-off here.

If you want a great shooting, reliable firearm from a reputable American company you have a few options. If you want all that and an incredible price point, check out the Security 9 Compact from Ruger.

Ruger Security 9 Compact Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 21.9 oz
Barrel Length: 3.42 inches
Cost: $299


CZ P-10S

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CZ P10S Holsters

CZ has always excelled at making ergonomic handguns that are incredibly reliable. CZ honestly makes world-class handguns. The CZ P-10S, in particular, is a world-class concealed carry handgun. It has everything you could want in a handgun other than it’s a touch wider than some of the newer double-stack-micro-compacts like the Sig P365 or Glock 43X. 

This is a typical double stack compact sized pistol. It conceals well yet still carries a respectable amount of ammunition.

The P-10S shoots almost as good as it’s big brothers (the P-10C & P-10F). It is much better suited for concealed carry though because of it’s smaller size.

The trigger, sights, ergonomics, and reliability are all just as good as the bigger versions in CZ’s stable.

Plus, you’ll love the removable plate on the slide that allows you to attach a red dot. And because this pistol is a bit wider than the micro-compacts toward the top of this article, it can fit a bigger optic on the slide.

A bigger optic will help you get on target faster.

CZ did not disappoint when they released the ‘S’ version of the P-10.

CZ P10S Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 12+1
Weight: 24.4 oz
Barrel Length: 3.5 inches
Cost: $529


CZ RAMI

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CZ RAMI Holsters

This pistol just won’t go away! It has been popular for a long, long time. And for good reason.

The CZ RAMI is based on the time-tested CZ-75. It has a lighter aluminum frame, a short 3” barrel, and a flush fit magazine that manages to cram in 10 rounds of 9mm. Also, you can add an extended mag that holds 14 rounds.

It has enough heft to handle hot 9mm ammo pretty well. All while maintaining a small & lightweight package that makes Concealed Carry a breeze.

The RAMI has proved that you don’t necessarily need the latest fad in firearms to have an effective concealed carry firearm.

Sure, an external hammer is a rare sight in today’s usual handgun selection. That doesn’t mean it doesn’t have it’s benefits though. After the first shot, the gun switches to single action mode.

It just doesn’t get much sweeter than a smooth single action trigger.

The RAMI isn’t the lightest gun in this list. It’s not the cheapest either. It’s a classic that won’t go away for a reason. Good engineering made this a timeless piece.

CZ RAMI Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-14
Weight: 26 oz
Barrel Length: 3”
Cost: $575


Taurus G3C

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Taurus G3C Holsters

Taurus has had a best seller for years in the PT111 G2. Well, Taurus still has a best seller in the PT111 G2. They just changed the name to the G2C and then the G3C. What did Taurus change to update the name? They took out the locking mechanism that allows a key to turn the pistol into a paperweight. Plus, they updated their logo. And Bam! New name.

In all honesty, ditching the locking mechanism was a smart move. It’s a moving part that can cause the pistol to not fire. Cases can be found on YouTube where the locking mechanism barely moves out of the “unlocked” position by a couple of millimeters. This caused the pistol to be “locked”.

The new G3C does not have this problem. Taurus took a great gun and made it more reliable.

Also, the G3C has a more durable finish. The trigger has also been improved over the older PT111 G2 and even over the G2C.

The G3C is barely bigger than a typical single stack pistol. Yet, it holds 12 rounds of 9mm.

Plus, it costs just a couple hundred bucks. If you’re on a budget, this should be on the top of your list.

Taurus G3C Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 12+1
Weight: 22 oz
Barrel Length: 3.2 inches
Cost: $199


Bersa TPR9C

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Bersa TPR9C Holsters

This pistol from Bersa is a very sweet shooter. The TPR9C is unique because Bersa utilizes some old-school features on this Concealed Carry gun. For instance, it has a metal frame rather than the usual polymer frame you’ll find on most new pistols. Also, it uses a hammer-fired trigger. These are still great features on a pistol. While the DA/SA trigger takes a bit more practice to master than a striker-fired trigger, the payoff is a sweet Single Action trigger.

Also, you’ll never know a balanced pistol until you’ve handled a metal-framed pistol. It truly feels great in your hand. Yes, it adds a few ounces. However, there are pros and cons to every trade-off. That extra weight absorbs recoil.

Truth be told, it’s not even very heavy. It’s a great Concealed Carry pistol.

Bersa TPR9C Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 13+1
Weight: 25 oz
Barrel Length: 3.25”
Cost: $390


Stoeger STR-9C

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Stoeger STR-9C Holsters

The STR-9c is Stoeger’s follow up to the popular STR-9. Stoeger is better known for long guns but they’ve decided to jump back into the handgun game too. The STR-9C is a compact version of their full size STR-9. It’s a 9mm striker-fired pistol. This is a great all-around pistol. There aren’t really any stand-out features on this handgun but it does check most of the boxes that a popular handgun should have.

So why is the STR-9C on this list? It checks most of the boxes while coming in at just around $250. You get a whole lot of concealed carry gun for that price.

You can see good ergonomics, stippling, large trigger guard, front serrations, striker-fired trigger, accessory rail, Glock-style take-down levers, and more.

It’s small enough to easily conceal carry and it packs plenty of ammo too.

Stoeger STR-9C Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 13+1
Weight: 24 oz
Barrel Length: 3.82”
Cost: $259


Beretta APX Carry

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Beretta APX Carry Holsters

Beretta released the APX Carry after they released the Full Size, Centurion, and Compact versions. To be honest, I’m not sure why Beretta called this gun the APX Carry. It’s an entirely different gun than the other (bigger) versions. Beretta made it look like an APX and called it an APX. In reality, the Carry version has its own thing going on. That’s not a bad thing either.

This single stack pistol is tiny. It only carries up to 9 rounds but it is a 9mm pistol. It’s reliable and a decent shooter. Beretta rarely makes a gun that isn’t amazing. This one is no exception.

It’s small, capable, and pack 9mm stopping power. Plus it’s backed up by Beretta’s pedigree.

Beretta APX Carry Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 6 – 8 +1
Weight: 19.8 oz
Barrel Length: 3.0 inches
Cost: $329


Sccy CPX

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CPX-1 Holsters

Sccy CPX is an American Gun Company with just that focuses on affordable, small concealed carry pistols.

The CPX-2 is still their most popular pistol.

The CPX-2 is a very decent pistol which can be found for $250. It’s lightweight and small enough to easily conceal. Also, it fits the hand fairly well because of its integrated finger grooves.

It’s a double-action only hammer-fired pistol. It has a long trigger pull that’s pretty smooth. It’s very similar to a Smith and Wesson snub-nose revolver trigger.

10 years ago, it was hard to find a good pistol for less than $300-$400. Because of pistols like the CPX, it’s a little easier today. If you need a reliable pistol and you don’t have a ton of spare cash, this might be the pistol for you. It doesn’t have the best trigger on the market but it does get the job done. You’ll have 10+1 rounds of 9mm in a nice Concealed Carry sized pistol. This is most definitely not a Saturday Night Special that might not go bang when you need it.

You can rest assured this is a reliable American made pistol that just plain works. It lacks the latest bells and whistles but the affordable price reflects that.

Sccy CPX-2 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 15 oz
Barrel Length: 3.1”
Cost: $179


Ruger LCR

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger LCR Holsters

Ruger broke tradition with this one. The Ruger LCR was the first carry revolver offered with a polymer frame. It’s available in many different calibers and a couple of different barrel lengths. The snub-nose version (in just about any caliber it’s offered in) makes a mighty fine Concealed Carry companion. It may be the best revolver for concealed carry.

It works great in your pocket or a belt holster for many reasons. First, it shoots pretty well due to its cushiony grip. Second, it’s very lightweight (at 13 ounces, it weighs barely more than the giant phone in your pocket). Finally, it also includes Ruger’s well-known reliability. This is a modern small revolver built specifically for Concealed Carry and Ruger knocked it out of the park with this concealed carry revolver.

Ruger LCR Holsters

Caliber: 38+P
Capacity: 5
Weight: 13 oz
Barrel Length: 1.87”
Cost: $400


S&W J Frame

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Smith & Wesson J Frame Holsters

The little S&W J Frame revolver has been around for decades. They’ve been around for so long that gangsters in black & white movies would pull them out of nowhere to strike fear in people. The J Frame makes an excellent pocket gun and one of the most suitable revolvers ever created for concealed carry. Its curvy body is a little less noticeable in your pants than a blocky pocket pistol. This makes it one of the best carry revolvers. 

Another factor making it great for Concealed Carry is how insanely reliable they are. When you press the bang switch, you’re almost guaranteed to hear a bang. They’re lightweight and hold 5 rounds of .38 Special +P (some argue that it’s pretty close to 9mm in stopping power).  That is why is is in out list of the best concealed carry revolvers / best ccw revolver.

S&W J Frame Holsters

Caliber: 38+P
Capacity: 5
Weight: 15 oz
Barrel Length: 1.87”
Cost: $400


HK VP9SK

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - HK VP9SK Holsters

The HK VP9SK  is a continuation of a good thing in the VP series from HK. It has all the qualities that VP9 fans love: great trigger, ergonomics, and handling. It holds 10 rounds of 9mm. Plus, 13 and 15 round magazines are available for the VP9SK. The useful charging handles remain on the subcompact version of the VP9. Now Concealed Carriers have a smaller option for Concealed Carry. 

This is the only subcompact handgun on the market that has swappable backstraps and swappable lateral grip panels. The HK VP9SK also has completely ambidextrous controls. How about that for one of the best subcompact 9mm?

Throw in the fact that the flat recoil spring reduces recoil and it’s clear to see that this is a subcompact that shooters will enjoy on the range. Plus it’s compact enough that it’s easy to Conceal Carry all day long in a good kydex holster.

HK VP9SK Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10+1
Weight: 23 oz
Barrel Length: 3.39”
Cost: $549


Best Concealed Carry Guns: Best Full-Size Handguns (Top Guns)

Glock 19 Gen 5

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 19 Gen 5 Holsters

The Glock 19 handles well enough to qualify as a service pistol. Yet, it’s still light enough to conceal carry. You can get a full-size grip on it and it handles accordingly.

Furthermore, the latest generation of the Glock 19 is simply amazing. It sports greater accuracy and ergonomics than the Gen 4 version. The trigger feel is better as well.

You’ll immediately notice the absence of finger grooves! Glock ditched the finger grooves for the FBI on the Glock 17M just before deciding to lose the grooves on all new models.

The improved accuracy via the Marksmen barrel is a welcome change as well.

If you want the feel of a service weapon in a compact package, the Glock 19 Gen 5 is the perfect example and one of the best concealed carry guns available. This just might be the best selling concealed carry pistol of all time.

It is also the one of the most popular Glocks available.

Glock 19 Gen 5 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 24 oz
Barrel Length: 4.02 inches
Cost: $540


Glock 19 MOS

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 19 MOS Holsters

Glock added a red dot Cutout to the Glock 19 and gave it the model name of Glock 19 MOS. That cutout will cost you but it is worth it if you’ve jumped on the red dot wagon. Red dots are amazing tools to help you get on target faster. Plus, you can actually focus on the target instead of the front sight.

If you like the Glock 19, you’ll love the Glock 19 MOS with your favorite red dot attached.

Glock 19 MOS Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 24 oz
Barrel Length: 4.02 inches
Cost: $599


Glock 23

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 23 Holsters

The Glock 23 is just a Glock 19 that has been chambered for a .40 cal cartridge. The .40 has a touch more stopping power. It has more than a touch more recoil though. The Glock 23 is noticeably snappier than the Glock 19. Training will allow you to get follow-up shots on target fast but this pistol can’t handle as well as the softer shooting G19.

If you’re willing to accept more recoil for a bigger bullet, the Glock 23 is a fine gun for concealed carry.

Glock 23 Holsters

Caliber: .40 S&W
Capacity: 13+1
Weight:  24 oz
Barrel Length: 4.02 inches
Cost: $539


Glock 45

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Glock 45 Holsters

The Glock 45 is one of the biggest guns on this list. However, it’s barrel isn’t extremely long at 4 inches. Also, consider that at under 25 ounces, it’s lighter than some smaller pistols on this list.

But here’s where the G45 shines: it holds 17 rounds. It’s longer grip balances with the 4-inch barrel very well. Not everyone can conceal a pistol with a larger grip as this pistol has. However, many people can. It mostly depends on how dedicated you are to dressing around the pistol.

The Glock 45 is basically a Glock 17 with a shorter barrel. So it feels like a service pistol with an easier to manage barrel length.

If you want to Conceal Carry 17 rounds of 9mm in a fantastic handling Glock, the G45 is right up your alley.

Glock 45 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 17+1
Weight:  25 oz
Barrel Length: 4.02 inches
Cost: $539


Beretta APX Centurion

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Beretta APX Full Size Holsters

Beretta’s latest polymer line of pistols is completely different than the PX4 line. Beretta moved into the polymer-framed striker-fired pistol market with a great entry. The APX lineup is loved by almost all reviewers. It is a sweet shooter for one of the best concealed carry guns.

Best of all, Beretta made Compact and Centurion versions especially for Concealed Carriers. The Centurion and Compact version both have shorter barrels and grips than the Full-Size APX.

The barrel length on the Compact and Centurion APX pistols is 3.7 inches rather than 4.25 inches. The Centurion grip is about 0.4″ shorter than the Full-Size APX while the Compact is about 0.4″ shorter than the Centurion.

The Centurion is extremely popular with Clinger Holster customers.  It’s big enough to fill your hand. Yet, it’s small enough to be a great Concealed Carry gun. So, this is one of the best EDC guns for big hands.

Plus, it’s an excellent performer on the shooting range.

Beretta APX Centurion Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10-15+1
Weight: 27 oz
Barrel Length: 3.7 inches
Cost: $475


Beretta APX Full Size

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Beretta APX Full Size Holsters

This is the full size version of the APX. While it’s not quite the fit for concealed carry that the Centurion is, it still works for concealed carry. That’s especially true if you like your concealed carry guns a little on the bigger side. The good news is that this pistol is still light enough to easily carry all day long while still providing a generous 18 round capacity. That’s quite impressive.

The APX has much to love in its design. The slide serrations are very easy to grab, the trigger is excellent, the handling is extremely impressive, and it has the pedigree of Beretta’s name.

Beretta APX (Full Size) Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 17+1
Weight: 27 oz
Barrel Length: 4.25 inches
Cost: $399


CZ P-01

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CZ 75 P-01 Holsters

The CZ P-01 is based on the bulletproof CZ-75 design with a lighter weight aluminum frame, shorter barrel, and shorter grip. Its ergonomics are of legendary status. All gun makers should strive for this level of ergonomic satisfaction.

It’s much easier to carry the lighter P-01 than the CZ-75 on which it’s based (due to its lighter alloy). However, you still get the great shooting dynamics the CZ-75 is known for.

CZ P-01 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 14+1
Weight: 28 oz
Barrel Length: 3.75 inches
Cost: $600


CZ P-01 Omega

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CZ P-01 Omega Holsters

The CZ P-01 Omega is a hot-rodded version of the P-01 we all know and love. It’s main attraction is a suppressor-ready extended barrel. Plus the tritium night sights are suppressor-height so that the still work when you thread a suppressor onto the barrel. It’s painted Urban Grey to look cool too.

Most people shy away from longer barrels like this on their concealed carry gun. However, the longer barrel doesn’t make it harder to conceal inside the waistband. It may be more likely to bump your seat when you’re sitting though.

Having said all that, this is an amazing, tricked out pistol that does a decent job at concealed carry.

CZ P-01 Omega Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 29 oz
Barrel Length: 4.4 inches
Cost: $699


CZ PCR

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - PCR Holsters

The CZ PCR is very similar to the CZ-75 Compact. However, it has a lightweight aluminum frame just as the P-01 does. The difference between the PCR and the P-01 is that the PCR doesn’t have a rail making it a little sleeker and easier to conceal.

It has the same legendary ergonomics that made CZ famous for manufacturing one of the best concealed carry guns.

CZ PCR Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 14+1
Weight: 27 oz
Barrel Length: 3.8”
Cost: $575


CZ P-10C

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - CZ P10C Holsters

While CZ proved it could make a great polymer-framed pistol with its P-07 & P-09 handguns, CZ took it’s time striking out into the striker-fired market. If CZ was waiting to introduce the P-10 series because they were taking their time to perfect the trigger, they’ve succeeded.

The trigger on this pistol is staggeringly good. It inches very close to a good Single Action trigger. Plus there are many other things to love on the handgun. It seems to dissipate recoil like a champ. Also, it’s small enough to make a great Concealed Carry handgun. Yet, it pleasantly fills your hand.

CZ’s most modern pistol to date was made to be equally at home in a Concealed Carry holster or a nightstand.

CZ P10C Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 26 oz
Barrel Length: 4.02 inches
Cost: $475


HK VP9

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - HK VP9 Holsters

The HK VP9 has shown how capable H&K is of producing fine firearms. Almost everyone loves this pistol. Its ergonomics and trigger are universally loved. It has the ergonomics of the great P30 but incorporates a great striker-fired trigger that loyal H&K fans have been asking for. It has the swappable back straps and side panels that people enjoyed on the P30.

Also, it was released with another surprising ergonomic feature: charging supports. Charging supports are small wings on the back of the slide that make racking the slide faster and easier.

You may be a little surprised to see a full-sized gun like the VP9 on a list of the best Concealed Carry guns. After all, it’s bigger than many will want for a Concealed Carry pistol. However, we sell concealment holsters for VP9 pistols in droves. Therefore, I know many people find it just fine for concealment.

HK VP9 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 25 oz
Barrel Length: 4.09”
Cost: $529


Ruger Security 9

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger Security 9 Holsters

Ruger developed the Security 9 as a direct competitor to the Glock 19. It’s barely big enough to be used as a service pistol. Yet, it’s just compact enough to make it viable as a daily Concealed Carry pistol. It is lightweight yet manages to hold 15 rounds of 9mm. Plus, it’s big enough to fill your hand while being compact enough to carry Inside the Waistband without tremendous effort.

Are you ready to hear the Security 9’s most talked-about feature? It’s incredibly affordable. You can almost buy two of these Ruger pistols for the price of one G19! Ruger was able to make a G19 competitor while keeping the price hundreds of dollars cheaper.

Is this another cheap 9mm gun then? No way. This is a great gun. Ruger has a reputation for building tough guns. They delivered. This is a well-built handgun. Ruger employed a hammer-fired trigger to cut costs. But let me tell you, this is a good trigger. It’s almost a great trigger. You see, it’s a double-action only trigger that feels incredibly close to a striker-fired trigger. I don’t know how Ruger’s engineers pulled it off but they surely made a sweet-shooting pistol at a crazy price point.

You won’t see fancy night sights or swappable backstraps at this price point. Many people don’t care for those features anyway (especially when hunting for a good pistol at a great price).

Ruger Security 9 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 23.8 oz
Barrel Length: 4 inches
Cost: $299


S&W M&P Compact M2.0

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - M&P M2.0 Compact Holsters

Smith & Wesson makes three barrel lengths for this one. It comes in 3.6 inch, 4 inch, and 4.625 inch versions. While the shorter barrel is easier to conceal (especially in the appendix carry position), the longer barrels are a bit more accurate. Plus, the longer barrels have a little bit less muzzle flip. These pistols have completely amazing ergonomics. S&W knows how to make a pistol fit your hand. In addition to great ergonomics, Smith and Wesson nailed the stippling. It’s very tacky and easy to keep a good grip on during rapid fire.

Two things stick out with this pistol. First, the quality is outstanding. You’ll see the quality as soon as you pick it up. Truly, the fit and finish are amazing. It’s no wonder their M&P series performs so well on the range. Smith and Wesson have learned over the last century how to make an outstanding handgun.

Secondly, the price separates the M&P Compact M2.0 from the other pistols behind the gun counter. It’s very affordable. It’s over $100 cheaper than some of the other quality handguns you’ll see at your local gun store. Sure, you can get a cheap pistol for less money. However, I’m talking about value here. The M&P Compact is affordable. Plus it’s a better pistol than most of the other pistols behind the gun counter. It is one of the best self defense pistols out there as well. 

The trigger, ergonomics, reliability, and shooting prowess is top-notch all across the board. This is truly an amazing pistol.

S&W M&P9 M2.0 Compact Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15
Weight: 27 oz
Barrel Length: 4 inches
Cost: $379


Sig P320 X-COMPACT

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig-P320-XCompact Holsters

The Sig P320 XCOMPACT is a shorter version of the Sig P320 X-Carry. However, it has mostly the same features as the other X-Series pistols. It has a 3.6″ barrel rather than the 3.9″ of the X-Carry. Also, its shorter grip is easier to Conceal Carry while still holding 15 rounds of 9mm.

You’ll have the option to add a Red Dot without the need for a machine shop to cut out the slide. It has great night sights as well. Also, the ergonomics are unmatched in any other pistol of this size among the best concealed carry guns. Plus, it has the same amazing Sig trigger as the other X-Series pistols from Sig. The flat trigger has an entirely fantastic feel.

This is one of the highest quality polymer pistols in this entire list of best concealed carry guns.

Sig P320 XCOMPACT Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 25.3 oz
Barrel Length: 3.6”
Cost: $799


Sig P229

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Sig P229 Holsters

The Sig P229 has been used by FBI, DEA, ICE, the Secret Service, and many smaller federal agencies. And for good reason. It just works. It’s heavy enough to produce fast follow up shots. Yet it’s not quite heavy enough to cause fatigue by the end of the day.  You can bet your ammo stockpile on the fact that the FBI tested the P229 5x further than it needed to be tested too. To say that it’s highly reliable would be a huge understatement. It’s insanely reliable.

On top of its reputation for reliability, Sig tacks on great accuracy. Sig owners enjoy great accuracy out of the box with the P229. One more thing can be said about how awesome these pistols are. The fit and finish on the P229 are always top-notch.

Some may question whether a gun with the size and weight of the P229 belongs on a list of the best Concealed Carry guns (or a list of the best 9mm pistols available). Take my word for it: there’s a ton of these Sigs that are actively carried daily.

Sig P229 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm, 40, 357 SIG
Capacity: 12-15+1
Weight: 29-32 oz
Barrel Length: 3.9”
Cost: $800+


Walther PPQ

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Walther PPQ Holsters

The Walther PPQ enjoys a very special place among modern striker-fired triggers. It’s the Gold Standard by which all others are judged. It is loved by all who touch it. It’s not uncommon to find yourself deciding which pistol to trade in after shooting it. If you hold and shoot it…you will covet it. Most striker-fired triggers feel the same every single shot. But some guns nail the execution better than others. The PPQ nails it better than just about anybody.

The PPQ also helped usher in the wave of ergonomic advances in handgun design. Once the PPQ was on the market, all others had to catch up as quickly as possible.

It’s small enough for concealed carry, yet big enough to shoot well. this is a great all-purpose 9mm handgun. Plus, it weighs in at just 24 ounces with a 15 + 1 capacity. There are a lot of great pistols on the market today because of guns like the PPQ. When a gun this sweet raises the bar, everyone else has to up their game as well. It’s one of the best Concealed Carry guns on the market.

Walther PPQ Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 24 oz
Barrel Length: 4”
Cost: $475


Walther PDP Compact 4″

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Walther PDP Compact Holstersƒsto

The Walther PDP pretty much a newer version of the famous PPQ. Walther made the trigger better. The stippling is grippier now as well.

The biggest change you’ll see is the red dot plate on the slide. That’s a very welcome addition. While Walther is marketing this to police departments around the world, they were thoughtful enough to make one with a compact grip.

The Compact version is great for concealed carriers. It offers the performance of a duty pistol in a package that’s small enough to work as a great concealed carry gun.

Walther PDP Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 24.4 oz
Barrel Length: 4”
Cost: $599


Stoeger STR-9

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Stoeger STR-9 Holsters

Stoeger makes great long guns. They now make great handguns too. The STR-9 is a great pistol at an amazing price. They really knocked it out of the park on their first go-around. 

Let’s look at everything this amazing pistol has going for it: great ergonomics, good stippling, good trigger, very good slide serrations (front & rear), good handling, and the list keeps going.

This is a great gun for the nightstand but it’s lightweight enough to make a  good concealed carry gun as well. This is a high quality firearm at an unbelievable price point.

It has different backstrap options for different hand sizes. The backstrap module actually wraps around to the sides too. That makes it more effective when trying to find the right one to fit your hand.

The low bore axis helps with fast follow up shots as well. This pistol handles really well.

Let’s be honest here: this gun should cost over $400. This looks, feels, and shoots like an expensive handgun. It’s crazy how affordable it is. Of course the price wouldn’t matter if it doesn’t have reliability to back it up. Fortunately, it has proven to be a very reliable firearm.

Remember that while Stoeger hasn’t made pistols in quite a while, they are a very large gun manufacturer with a long history of making reliable guns.

Stoeger STR-9 Holsters

Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 15+1
Weight: 30.4 oz
Barrel Length: 4.17”
Cost: $259


Ruger-57

Best Concealed Carry Handguns - Ruger-57 Holsters

This might seem odd to you. Not many people would expect to see a Ruger-57 in a list of the best concealed carry guns. Well, there’s a first time for everything.

Here’s why this gun is on this list. Our customers are ordering a lot of inside the waistband holsters for this gun. That means a lot of people are using this in their concealed carry rotation.

There are a few reasons why many people are carrying this pistol. It only weighs 24 oz. It holds 20 rounds. Plus, it’s a very soft shooting round for which this pistol is chambered. FNH developed the round to work in their Five-Seven pistol and P-90 rifle. The idea was a small bullet (translate into high capacity) that was soft shooting but still had a high velocity.

Ruger made a pistol that could use the round too. However, Ruger’s version is not only cheaper, a whole lot of shooters actually prefer it to the FN Five-Seven.

It can definitely work as a good concealed carry pistol.

Ruger-57 Holsters

Caliber: 5.7 x 28mm
Capacity: 20+1
Weight: 24.5 oz
Barrel Length: 4.94”
Cost: $599


We know that these guns qualify as the 50 best concealed carry guns on the market. We say these are the “best handguns” because these are the firearms our customers have ordered the most holsters for. We let the true market be the judge.

Which of these best concealed carry guns do you love? Let us know in the comments.

If you buy one of these handguns, be sure to check out Clinger Holsters for the best gun holsters to carry your new handgun in complete comfort. We hope that this review helps you select the best gun for your concealed carry routine (whether you prefer the best full size 9mm pistol or a small .38 revolver). Even if budget is an issue, some of the best handguns I’ve listed here very affordable handguns for the quality that you get.

Oh, I have a confession to make. There are quite a few more than 50 guns in this list. I just couldn’t narrow it down any further though. Every gun on this list belongs on it.

Checkout out our blog for everything concealed carry.

Sig P365 Laying on Holster

Sig P365 in 2021: Still the Best Concealed Carry Gun?

Is the Sig P365 Still the Best Handgun For Concealed Carry in 2021?

That’s a big question to ask and we’ve got a long answer. The P365 premiered in 2018 and was unlike any gun we’d ever seen before. It was the size of a single stack 9mm with the capacity of a subcompact double stack. SIG designed a unique magazine that maximized the gun’s size efficiently. The P365 got it’s namesake because its a firearm you can carry every day of the year.

The P365 ships with two 10 round magazines, but upon release, a slightly extended 12 rounder was available. Shortly after, SIG released a monstrous 15 round magazine as well. The P365 came out of the box, ready to be carried. It sported night sights, came with a pinky extension and proved to be a very easy shooting gun.

Does the P365 still stand up, though? It’s been almost two years, and it’s a fair question. The gun industry is one that moves fast, and competition is stiff. Has the P365 been outdone? Is it a one-trick pony? Well, let’s talk about it.

Sig P365 compared to Sig P365 XL and Sig P365 MS

Sig P365’s Shaky Start

The P365 premiered at SHOT to critical acclaim. The gun was absolutely genius. Its design had never been seen before, and it was a genuinely innovative gun in a stale market. Upon launch, the firearm sold like hotcakes until SIG stopped shipping them. It was immediately added to our best concealed carry gun.

SIG found out the sights they were shipping with the guns were failing to glow in the dark. Also, the initial batch of weapons had weak strikers and broke very early into their round counts. SIG wisely stopped production and offered fixes to customers who already purchased the guns.

They fixed the problems and began producing the weapons once more. This could have been disastrous, but SIG seemed to maintain their momentum, and the guns can now achieve high round counts without issues. My P365 is sitting at more than 3K rounds at this point and still ticking.

Same Sig P365, Different Models

Sig P365 in hand with 15 round magazine is the best handgun for concealed carry Sig P365 is still the best handgun for concealed carry Sig P365MS is one of the best handguns for concealed carry in 2020

The P365 sports the same modular frame mechanic the P320 does. The serialized portion legally considered a firearm is a chassis that can be removed and swapped between different frames, opening up the potential for one gun to easily change the size and fit into different configurations. SIG has also been quite quick to release new arrangements.

Having different configurations and options most certainly keeps a gun relevant. It also helps the gun appeal to a broader crowd. A lot of P365 owners may be happy with the first model, but some may desire something a little different.

It started with the XL model. A slightly larger gun that used a longer barrel and grip with 12 round magazines stock and could use the 15 rounders to add a little more firepower to the overall package. The XL model also brought with a flat-faced trigger and was optic ready. The optic plate used the Shield RSM/c or SIG’s new Romeo Zero micro red dot.

Differences between the Sig P365 and P365XL

Multiple Sig P365 Models Next to each other

Following that, SIG released the SAS model. SAS stands for SIG Anti Snag, and its been a configuration they’ve done before with other guns. Anti Snag means they reduced all possible snag points to make the weapon easy to draw from deep concealment. This includes popping the sights off entirely and installing a unique sighting system. Known as the FT Bullseye tritium night sight, you get a sighting system that sits flush with the slide and is virtually only a rear sight.

However, the sight works by featuring three dots that you have to line up to accurately shoot. This ensures the gun is plenty precise at concealed carry ranges. It’s tricky to get accustomed to, but not impossible. It takes a little retraining, but at 15 yards, you can make headshots. Beyond 15 to 20 yards and things get a little harder accuracy wise. The SAS Model also made the slide lock and takedown lever flush fitting to the frame.

The SAS version is also ported to reduce muzzle rise, and this works surprisingly well. It creates some flash, but not enough to blind you. The SAS P365 has proven to be quite popular and is flying off shelves.

Next, Sig wised up to public demand and added the P365X to their lineup. The P365X uses the same frame as the P365XL but with the shorter barrel and slide of the original P365. Oh yeah, here comes the “listening to public demand” part: the Sig P365X has a red dot cutout.

In my opinion, the P365X is the best version. It offers the shorter barrel with a 12 round mag and a red dot sight. This is truly concealed carry perfection.

If you like the idea of the longer barrel then you’d probably pick the P365XL as your favorite.

Here’s a deeper analysis of the Sig P365XL vs the Sig P365.

What About the Aftermarket for the Sig P365?

The aftermarket is another reason guns succeed. The more they are supported, the more appealing they become. Glock is an excellent example of this. You can buy a base model Glock and turn it into just about anything you want. The P365 has been met by the industry wholeheartedly. Clinger Holsters had Sig P365 Holsters for sale just days after the pistol’s release.

Sig P365 Holsters ready at release

sig p365 kydex holster

From holsters to new triggers, sights, baseplates, magazine releases, and more, the P365 has a healthy aftermarket. Heck, you can even install your P365 into a new frame. I used an all-metal Icarus Precision ACE Grip for my P365. This completely changed how the gun handles and feels.

You have light options from Streamlight and SIG Sauer, as well as various laser options. It goes on and on. The aftermarket supports the SIG P365 rather well, and the gun’s popularity tends to help the aftermarket grow.

SIG has released grip modules, slides, and other features that allow you to change your P365 around. Part of the gun’s staying power is people’s ability to modify, carry, and enjoy it.

Does the Sig P365 Have Competition?

I might as well mention the gun’s competition. It is really starting to stack up.

Many gun companies are swarming this new category that Sig created. Sig calls this new category a “High-Capacity Micro-Compact”.

A gun company can claim their product is in whatever category they want. This is the understood rule though: it’s a gun that’s the size of a single stack with a double stack magazine and a short barrel.

Single stack guns are typically one inch or less in width rather than a more typical 1&1/2 inch width of a double stack. A double stack magazine should carry 10 or more rounds rather than the 6 or 7 that a traditional single stack mag would carry.

Here’s a list of competitors: Glock 43X MOS, Hellcat OSP, Ruger Max-9, Taurus GX4, S&W Shield Plus, and Kimber R7. All of these guns are an inch or less in width and carry 10 or more rounds. Don’t you just love today’s technology!

The first gun to truly challenge the P365 was the Springfield Hellcat. In fact, there’s a great Sig P365 vs Springfield Hellcat article on our Gun Blog.

The Glock 43X and 48 offer the same capacity but are just a bit larger than the P365.

You can also find great articles on Sig P365XL vs the Glock 43X  or the Sig P365 vs the Glock 43 on our Gun Blog.

Sig P365XL Laying Next to Glock 43X

Springfield Hellcat next to Sig P365XL

The Hellcat is made by HS out of Croatia and imported by Springfield. The Hellcat offers 11 to 13 rounds in the same size package as the P365. This 11 round magazine edges out the P365 by a single round. The Hellcat does come ready to carry with an excellent set of night sights, two magazines, and an optional pinky extension.

The Springfield Hellcat also comes in an optic’s ready model. Sig now offers optics options in the P365X and the P365XL models. Shorter guns get more benefit from mini red dots because their sight radius doesn’t matter with a mini red dot. I would say the smaller, optics ready Hellcat is a brilliant idea and it’s nice that Sig followed suit with the P365X. Now you can have your cake and eat it too. You get a small gun with large capacity and a red dot!

Who’s Issuing the Sig P365?

Vertical view of the Sig P365XL

When police or military forces adopt a gun, you can see it’s lifespan increase significantly. The P365 isn’t going to be approved by any military anytime soon, but police forces have taken a look at it. As the law enforcement market is going back to 9mm, the P365 is getting some attention.

While it’s too small for use as a duty gun, it has been approved as a backup gun by two police departments. Sumter Police in South Carolina was the first to adopt the P365 as a backup gun. Following the South Carolina adoption, we saw the Indiana State Police choose the P365 as their backup gun of choice.

The P365 will likely see an excellent career as a backup gun in the hands of many more police officers. The P320 is quickly becoming a favorite, and this helps open the doors for the smaller P365. As more police forces adopt it, you’ll see more and more attention given to it by casual shooters.

Casual Shooters and Mass Appeal

Most people reading this blog are likely more informed than your average casual shooter. We may be pickier and more knowledgeable, but the majority of shooters are not. You see, the casual concealed carrier rules the market. The P365 most certainly appeals to them.

Weight and size are one reason why. Add on the features, the capacity, and the price, and you’ve captured the casual shooting market. Factor in the reputable and somewhat legendary name SIG and you’ll attract more of it. People have heard of SIG, and their guns are popular in military and police forces.

On top of that, the P365 has won numerous awards. Shooting Illustrated, an NRA publication, has named it the Handgun of the Year. The SAS model was named Best New Handgun at the National Association of Sporting Goods Wholesalers-Professional Outdoor Media Association’s awards. The P365 also won handgun of the year from Guns and Ammo magazine.

If someone were googling and searching for a small gun that’s proven popular, the P365 would prove to be a very popular gun. It has instant mass appeal to new shooters. If a casual shooter went as far as to go to a gun range and rent a gun, the P365 would be on the shelf due to its popularity.

It’s also a soft shooting gun that’s easy to rack, accurate, and has a great trigger. All features any shooter could appreciate. My friend owns a gun store and says the P365 sells itself. People like the way it feels, it’s capacity and its size. He can hardly keep them on the shelves. I mean it was in John Wick 3 guys, it’s popular.

The Sig P365 In 2021: Still the Best Concealed Carry Handgun

The P365 is most certainly a blockbuster pistol. That has brought competition to bear.

Sig P365 and Sig P365XL

That competition still needs to prove itself against the P365’s King status. They’ll also need to get holsters, accessories, magazines, and excellent logistics to compete. The competitors still need to build public trust too. Sig has a multi-year head start on them.

That takes time, effort, and a lot of marketing. The P365 was so successful so fast because it was the first gun of its type. Another company won’t have that same opportunity that SIG had. They have to fight their way uphill.

Long Live the King of Concealed Carry

I don’t think the SIG P365 will be unseated as the best concealed carry gun (or best selling gun) for quite some time. I think it will remain the king and the competition will have to fight hard to unseat the SIG P365. For now, the P365 remains the champ of concealed carry guns. SIG did a great job designing the weapon and was fast to fix the small issues they ran into. The gun will be around for a long time, folks.

For now, all we can say is long live the king.

Also See our Sig P365 Holsters & Sig P365 XL Holsters.

Sig P365 Pistols with magazines laying next to them

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Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365 (with pictures)

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365

A Comprehensive Analysis

I remember holding the P365 when it premiered at SHOT show and thinking this is going to change the concealed carry world. It premiered in January, and I had mine in March. I’ve carried it since then and watched with satisfaction that I was right. The industry has been responding, Glock for example released two handguns to compete with SIG, but they didn’t strike the same sense of awe in me that the P365 did. In fact, until September 25th, 2019, there was no real competitor that came close in size and capacity. In a move that surprised us all. Springfield released the Hellcat. 

Side Profile of Springfield Hellcat

The SIG P365 created the micro-compact 9mm genre, and the Hellcat is the only other true gun to fit the P365’s mission set. It’s incredibly small, lightweight, and best of all, it packs a relatively high capacity. A capacity high enough to make California get a little shakey. The guns have a lot in common in regards to size and capacity, but they also have some distinct differences. The P365 is made in New Hampshire, and the Hellcat is made in Croatia. 

Profile of Sig P365

The P365 is an entirely new gun, and the Hellcat is a continuation of the XD series of handguns. The SIG P365’s 599 MSRP is slightly more than the Hellcat’s 569 MSRP. While at first glance, they are both small, striker-fired, black guns like many others, they are both very different guns. 

This comparison will have more differences than our Sig P365XL vs Sig P365 comparison did.

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Fit and Finish

The SIG P365 uses a matte grayish Nitron finish over a stainless steel slide. This combination makes the slide entirely rustproof. Stainless steel has an inherent resistance to rust and corrosion, as does the Nitron finish. The matter gray appearance is certainly eye-pleasing in a Spartan kind of way. As always, I appreciate the minimal markings from the manufacturer. The Nitron finish on a stainless slide is a stronger option. 

Sig P365 vs Springfield Hellcat size

The Hellcat is a machined billet slide with a melonite finish. Melonite isn’t fancy, but it’s well-proven and reliable. Melonite resists rust and is tough to scruff and scrape. Springfield also takes a more minimalist approach to markings but has more than SIG. You get a Springfield Armory marking and logo, as well as a Hellcat logo. 

Both feature heavily textured polymer frames. From experience, the texture works. Neither is overly aggressive or uncomfortable. I do like the fact the Hellcat has texture on the upper portion of the grip. SIG ends their texturing at the magazine release. 

Both guns have different length magazines available for them, and both companies do an outstanding job of integrating the magazine into the grip with a seamless transition. It looks good and fits perfectly into the gun. 

These two pistols have a higher fit and finish than a gun like the Taurus G3C. That doesn’t mean it’s not fun to do a Taurus G3C vs Sig P365 comparison though. In fact, that comparison is on our blog.

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Specs

Here is where the guns get a razor-like line drawn between them. The P365 initially turned heads because it was the size of a single stack 9mm with the capacity of a double stack. The Hellcat keeps that same appeal. When it comes to specifications of small carry guns, you typically consider length, height, weight, and width. With these two guns, we also have to look at capacity in regards to the size of the weapon. 

The P365 is slightly lighter at 17.8 ounces compared to Springfield’s 18.3 ounces. Weight will vary based on which mag you use, but for this example, it’s with the gun’s flush-fitting magazine. The SIG P365 is also a shorter, more efficient handgun. It’s 5.8 inches long with a 3.1-inch barrel. The Hellcat is 6 inches overall with a 3-inch barrel. 

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365 dimensions

The SIG is a little taller at 4.3 inches, and the Hellcat is 4 inches with its flush magazine, and 4.5 with its extended magazine. The SIG P365, with it’s 12 rounded extended magazines, is 4.7 inches. Both the SIG and the Hellcat allow for a full handed grip without a hanging pinky as well. Both guns have a reported width of 1 inch. The SIG is a little more trim along the slide, and the Hellcat is a bit more blocky. 

The biggest difference is the capacity. The SIG comes with two ten-round magazines, and the Hellcat comes with an 11 round and 13 round magazine. The P365 does have 12 and even 15 rounders available, but these will cost a pretty penny, roughly 50 bucks per. I think SIG needs to step up and include a 12 round magazine with the 10 round mag. Here the Hellcat takes a good lead. 

Sig P365 vs Springfield Hellcat Magazine

While SIG does offer the 15 round magazine, it does extend quite far out of your gun and isn’t practical for carry. It also doesn’t come with the P365. 

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Ergonomics

Both guns are impressive ergonomically. I hate when my pinky hangs off a gun, and both guns offer me an excellent and full grip. The texturing on both grips keeps the firearm in your hand and refuses to let it move out of your hand. Neither has such aggressive stippling that it will rub you raw while you carry. 

Springfield Hellcat laying on Concrete

One thing I do appreciate a lot about both guns is the trigger guard undercut. Both guns have a higher undercut that allows for an excellent and high grip on the weapon. High grips are excellent for extra control and allowing those of us with big hands to have a comfortable grip on the gun. 

Another issue my big hands have with small guns is slide bite. The Glock 43, the Taurus G2S, and several more chew my hand up. Neither the Hellcat or SIG P365 gives me slide bite. The Hellcat offers a bit more Beavertail than the P365, which can translate to extra control. 

Sig P365 laying on Concrete

The SIG P365 has a broader magazine release, and the Hellcat has a longer one. Both are easy to use, and press in without issue. They make it easy to drop the magazine and reload your next one. 

Both guns have front and rear serrations for cocking. The Hellcat has much more aggressive serrations. They go slightly over the top of the slide and are a bit deeper than the P365’s. They offer an excellent purchase and make it easy to rack the gun. 

Both guns feature slide locks that will never work for me. My thumbs are too big and seem to press both down as I fire the gun. This keeps the slide from locking rearward when the last round is fired. 

The bottom line is this: both of these pistols have great ergonomics. This is especially true when comparing to a smaller gun. For instance, the ergonomics work out if favor of the Sig when doing a Glock 43 vs Sig P365 comparison.

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Features

The features of both guns are actually quite different. They both have multiple magazine sizes, as we mentioned before. SIG pulls ahead with it’s 15 round magazine, but the Hellcat comes with a 13 round magazine and both flush and extended baseplates. 

Springfield Hellcat Front Sight is green

Both guns also feature day and night sights. SIG Uses the XRAY3 sights that feature three tritium vials and a high visibility green wrap around the front sight’s vial. The Hellcat uses Trijicon sights that feature a U shaped rear and a front sight with a tritium vial and high visibility yellow wrap. 

Both sights are natural to acquire and quick into action. From the draw, you’ll have no issues finding either front sight. Which is better is really up to the individual user. I like both and find them intuitive and easy to use. 

Sig P365 Front Sight is Dark Green

The Hellcat features a fascinating device at the end of the gun. It has a built-in stand-off device beneath the barrel. This device is there in case if someone gets on top of you or you are pressed against your attacker, your gun can still fire. It prevents the slide from coming out of battery when pressed against something. The P365 doesn’t have that feature. 

The Hellcat also has an OSP model that allows for mounting an optic. The P365 XL model has this feature, but not the standard P365. 

Clinger has excellent Springfield Hellcat holsters that support the Red Dot option if you go that route.

The SIG P365 features a small proprietary rail that a few companies are making lights and laser for. SIG, in particular, makes there own light and laser for the gun. Streamlight also makes the TLR 6 P365 compatible. 

The Hellcat has a Picatinny rail that will fit the vast majority of accessories. This includes lights and lasers from Crimson Trace, Viridian, Olight, and Streamlight. The Picatinny rail addition does allow for more universal use of accessories. 

The Hellcat also features a flat-faced trigger with a Glock style tab. The SIG P365 uses a traditional rounded trigger, but flat-faced triggers are available. The Sig P365 holster from Clinger will work with either trigger group.

The P365 also has a removable chassis, and you can swap frames and slides to alter your P365 is nearly every direction. I own an aluminum frame for my P365, and swapping between the two platforms is very easy to do. The Hellcat does not have that feature. 

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Shooting Characteristics

Recoil wise both guns are very comfortable. They don’t slap the hand or cause discomfort when firing. I could fire both guns all day long and never run into any pain. Small guns that are pleasant to shoot are guns that people will train with. 

There’s a video with slow motion footage of the P365 in action over on our Sig P365 Review.

Accuracy wise you’ll be able to stretch your toes out to 25 yards and still score headshots. The sights on both guns are incredibly easy to focus on. These are pro-grade sights that are well made and crafted for accuracy. 

Contributing to both the gun’s accuracy is their excellent triggers. I prefer a flat face trigger, so a personal preference goes to the Hellcat. However, the P365 is still my carry gun, and the stock trigger is excellent. Both triggers haves light and crisp pulls, consistent performance, and excellent resets. 

I’ve had the SIG for over a year, and it’s seen several thousand rounds at this point. I’ve had the Hellcat for just a week, so calling it on reliability is difficult. The SIG has proven itself plenty reliable in my experience. The Hellcat is still new, and we haven’t seen a massive amount of experiences with it. 

The guns are so close in size and specs that it’s hard to find major differences between the two. I could likely have you shoot both blindfolded, and you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference of either. 

Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365: Concealment

Here is where both guns will be used 99% of the time. Concealing a gun can be a hassle, but it doesn’t have to be. The right holster can make any gun a dream to carry, but the Hellcat and P365 are both already dreamlike to carry. They are small and lightweight, and when combined with a great Springfield Hellcat holster they disappear completely. They are also comfortable to carry guns, and when paired with the right holster, you’ll forget you are carrying it. 

The P365 has been my go-to carry gun for quite some time, and it has never been spotted. Even when carried OWB, you can’t see it.

Getting a comfortable Sig P365 Holster that conceals well will make you love your Sig even more.

Both SIG and Springfield Armory have created guns that are near pocket pistol size, so concealing either is rather simple. 

Conclusion

The market is changing and will be permanently altered by the P365. SIG now has Three P365 models, including the standard, XL, and SAS models, so they do offer choices with a ton of different features. 

Springfield Hellcat has a Flat Trigger

 

The Hellcat is the first real competition the P365 has faced. Springfield came out swinging with both a standard Hellcat and an OSP model. Now the rest of the industry needs to catch up and toss their hat in the ring. 

Sig P365 has a Curved Trigger

The guns are packed with features that make them amazing choices for concealed carry. Mixing small size with high capacity has given the P365 and Hellcat a major advantage for concealed carriers. Best of all, these guns are relatively affordable and stuffed full of features. They are comfortable to carry so they will be carried, and they are comfortable to shoot so they will be shot.  

This makes them fantastic firearms and the perfect choice for both experienced and new concealed carriers. 

Sig P365 XL VS Glock 43X.

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X (with pictures)

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X

A Comprehensive Analysis

We are living in the Golden Age of concealed carry pistols with the Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X. Never has there been a better time to be shopping for a concealed carry handgun. That being said, the market is changing just slightly. For quite some time the goal was to make the guns as small as possible. Guns like the Ruger LCP and S&W Bodyguard 380 ruled due to their small size. These guns are notoriously difficult to shoot accurately and quickly so things have been changing. 

These days the goal seems to be to strike a perfect balance of size and shootability. Concealed carry holsters & guns are getting larger, and therefore easier to shoot. They feature long grips that fill the hand and makes it easier to fire accurately, as well as rapidly. Capacities have also increased, and most are in 9mm versus the earlier choice of 380 ACP. Two of the best examples of this trend is the P365 XL and the Glock 43X. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X comparison

Both guns are upgrades of smaller models from previous generations. SIG introduced the original P365 to great critical acclaim and followed up this year with the larger P365 XL. The Glock 43X took the six-round Glock 43 and extended the grip and magazine so it now holds 10 rounds. The X designation seems to be Glock’s new moniker for a short barrel but a long grip. Both guns are an interesting representation of the new concealed carry trend and we wanted to take a look at both today. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X comparison detailed close up

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Fit and Finish

The Glock 43X comes in two different finishes. Initially, it was launched only with a Silver nPVD finish that I love. I’m a stainless-steel kind of guy and while this isn’t real stainless it looks absolutely amazing. Glock always had a Henry Ford philosophy on color and has done alternative colors rarely. It’s nice to see the nPVD finish as a common stock option. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X comparison

Just recently Glock also unveiled a more traditional G43X with a Black nDLC finish that brings back that traditional Glock look. Both the silver and black guns will feature a black frame that resembles the Gen 5 finger groove free design. The slide has minimal markings with a simple Glock logo, the 43X moniker, caliber and made in Austria markings. It’s simple and I appreciate simple a lot. 

The nPVD and nDLC coating are rugged and strong. They will resist holster wear well and very resistant to corrosion. 

The SIG P365 XL only comes in one finish option as of now, and that is a matte greyish black Nitron coating. The Nitron coating has proven to be a very rugged and well-done coating. It’s strong and resists sweat, as well as abrasions and scratches. It’s also a champ against concealed carry holster wear. 

Sig P365 XL detail

The Nitron coating is something SIG Seems to love, and I can see why. It does work wonderfully and does an excellent job at coating the gun and protecting it. I’m still partial to the stainless look of the G43X but objectively the Nitron coating is a well done and well-reputed coating. The SIG P365 XL has an XL marking as well as a P365 marking. Both small and simple and appreciated. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Specs 

These guns are similar in size and weight but feature a few distinct differences. Both are 9mm, striker fired handguns, and both are considered sub compact firearms. The SIG P365 does come with a 12-round magazine, and there is an option for a 15-round magazine. The Glock 43X only currently has the option for a 10-round magazine. 

The Glock 43X has a barrel length of 3.41 inches and the P365 XL has a barrel length of 3.7 inches total. That’s not a major difference. Sight radius is also similar with the G43X is 5.24 inches and sight radius with the SIG P365 XL is 5.6 inches total. 

There is a difference in weight that some might feel considerable. The SIG P365 XL weighs 20.7 ounces and the Glock 43X weighs 16.4 ounces. That’s roughly a 20% difference in weight. Widthwise these guns are both 1.1 inches wide total. Lengthwise the G43X is a slightly shorter 6.5 inches, but the P365 XL is only 6.6 inches long so it’s a wash. 

The guns are very similar in design and size. The SIG weighs more, but also offers an additional 2 to 5 rounds total. That can be a make it break it deal going in both directions. I’m a big fan of more rounds versus fewer rounds, but others may appreciate the lower overall weight.

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Ergonomics 

If you like the Glock style grip and grip angle, you’ll love the Glock 43X’s design. It features the same standard blocky Glock grip we all know and love. It’s just much thinner than most Glock grips, but it’s all Glock. Which is a love it or leave it design. What they did increase is the beavertail near the rear of the gun. This prevents the slide bit many of us found with the original Glock 43. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X detailed side by side comparison

The longer grip is most certainly an improvement and the addition of front serrations were something people had wanted for a long time. The longer grip does offer more control overall and it does make the gun easier to handle, especially when it comes to shooting rapidly or shooting at longer ranges. 

The G43X is a simple gun with very few controls. The magazine release is larger than most in its class and that’s a solid feature to have. It bends in well and is easy to activate. The gun also sports a simple slide lock and that’s it. It’s a simple gun and simple is always good. 

The SIG P365 XL is strong on the ergonomic front in my opinion. The grip is slightly longer than the P365 grip, and it truly fills the hand. The P365 XL makes use of a deep undercut that allows for a high and comfortable grip. On top of that The P365 XL does feature a nice beavertail that’s extended to provide greater control overall. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X grip size comparison

The gun is incredibly comfortable in the hand and very comfortable to shoot. The front and rear serrations are a nice touch and are slanted slightly rearward for a more aggressive texture. The magazine release is smaller than the Glock 43 and triangular in design. 

Both guns are controllable and comfortable. The ergonomic differences will be largely subjective between shooters, but I tend to gravitate more to the P365 XL than the 43X. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Features

The Glock 43X is light on features. It does come with a slightly longer beavertail than the original 43. You also get two ten-round magazines. These magazines are unique between the G48 and G43X. Extended magazines designed for the original G43 from companies like ETS are not compatible with the G43X. The G43X comes with Glock loading tool as well as standard Glock Tupperware container. 

The G43X features plastic sights with Glock’s target sight design. These are typically replaced quite quickly by most owners for numerous reasons. One big reason is the durability of plastic sights. The gun sports all of Glock’s standard safety features as well.  

The P365 XL comes with SIG’s XRAY3 sights that are a combination day and night sight. They glow very brightly when the lights are low, but also feature a high visibility green ring around the front sight for day time use. The P365 XL also comes from the factory milled for a red dot optic, specifically the Shield RMS and the new SIG Romeo Zero. The milling is revealed by removing a rear plate that also accepts the rear sights. 

The P365 XL comes with SIG Sauer’s often hard to get flat-faced trigger which is a lovely touch. It decreases the trigger reach and offers more control over the trigger. The grip also features an integrated carry magwell for quicker and more intuitive reloads. 

The SIG also comes with two 12 round magazines and 15 round mags are available on the aftermarket. Admittedly, SIG’s magazines are much more expensive than Glock’s. SIG mags will typically run you 50 bucks. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Shooting Characteristics 

Here is where we see some of the more minor differences. While the guns feel different in the hand, they are both easy shooting guns. Neither gun will bite your hand, and both guns are very comfortable to shoot. The extra grip length is an incredible addition to these guns. They make the guns the perfect compromise of size between control and concealability. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X side by side comparison

You can certainly shoot more accurately, as well as have more control over the gun as you fire. This makes it easier to execute double taps and put more rounds on target in an accurate manner. Speaking of more rounds on target the major advantage SIG has is there 12 and of course, 15 round magazines. The 15 round magazine does offer you 50% more lead over the G43X magazines. That’s one of the biggest differences between the two guns when it comes to range time. Of course, SIG’s 15 round mag will be a bit longer than Glock’s 10 round mag.

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X close up side by side comparison

Admittedly, another major difference is the SIG XRAY3 sights. These combination day and night sights are easier to acquire than the stock Glock plastic sights. I appreciate that bright green ring around the front sight for fast sight acquisition. To me, they are easier to focus on and front sight focus is the key to accurate shooting. 

The SIG’s enhanced magwell is a nice touch when it comes to reloading the gun. You can reload like lightning and I do really love extended magwells on concealed carry guns. 

The extended grip each gun provides does make it easier to grip the gun on the draw. Smaller guns tend to be harder to get a good grip on. Luckily these grips are just the right length for a strong grip and a reliable draw. As I mentioned these are easier to shoot guns, and that makes them more fun to shoot. 

If a gun is fun to shoot you are more likely to train, and if you are more likely to train you are more likely to succeed in a self-defense scenario. 

Both guns offer you everything you need to be a fast and accurate shooter. The rest is on you and your training. While there are differences both guns are excellent tools for self-defense and concealed carry. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X: Concealment 

The Glock 43X is ultimately the smaller and lighter-weight gun, so by default, it’s the easier gun to carry. The Glock 43X is a pint-sized carry gun that’s ultra-thin and very comfortable in a variety of carrying configurations. This includes appendix where the shorter barrel makes it more comfortable in an appendix carry holster. 

The SIG P365 XL is a little bigger and heavier, and even more so when equipped with a red dot sight. The SIG P365 XL is as equally thin as the Glock 43X so it’s very comfortable for deep concealment when it comes to IWB or appendix carry. 

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X side by side comparison

These guns are both designed for concealed carry and are both easy to carry. They are both bigger versions of smaller guns which makes them slightly harder to conceal than the original smaller guns. You won’t be carrying these guns in your pocket for example. 

You will need a good, supportive concealed carry holster designed for your firearm. If you can do that you’ll have no issues making either gun disappear around your waist. Supportive is the keyword here, as that will decide the difference between comfortable concealed carry and just concealed carry. If your Kydex holster isn’t comfortable, you won’t conceal carry as often.

Sig P365 XL vs Glock 43X side by side comparison

Conclusion 

The Glock 43X and SIG P365 XL are the perfect representations of the new face of concealed carry handguns. The market is always shifting, but as far as I’m aware this is the first big push towards thin, moderately sized firearms. 

Price-wise the SIG is predictably more expensive. It’s more expensive in nearly every way when it comes to sights and magazines. The Glock brand tends to be more affordable overall. 

Sig concealed carry gun in durable and modular Kydex Holster

These guns are easier to shoot and offer a higher magazine capacity. Yet, they are still easy to conceal for shooters of all sizes. These guns are much better fighting handguns than previous mini 9mms. Both are excellent tools for self-defense. They come from companies well-proven in their designs and both are on the cutting edge of concealed carry. 

Make sure you purchase a durable and modular Glock 43X holster or Sig P365 XL holster and you’ll be ready to conceal carry a great firearm.

Which would you carry? And why? Let us know. 

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365 (with pictures)

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365

A Comprehensive Analysis

Without a doubt, the SIG P365 has revolutionized the small gun. It’s an ultra-concealable pocket rocket that packs 10 rounds where most guns can only pack 6. It’s small size and high capacity made it a standout gun. I’ve been carrying one for years now and it’s been a constant companion. It’s small, easy to shoot, reliable, and it gives me options. Now a couple of years later, there’s a debate picking up steam. Looking at the P365 vs P365xl, which is better for concealed carry?

In early June 2019, a few retailers big in the industry started displaying SIG Sauer OEM 15 round magazines on their websites. Of course, they were out of stock, and lacking a picture. Just an entry, but rumors circulated that something big was coming.

Finally, the SIGP365XL smashed its way into the collective industry. Several retailers leaked the information and I reached out to my friends at SIG for an official announcement and they gladly passed me the spec sheet.

The SIG P365XL wasn’t out yet, so we compared it based on experiences with the P365 and similar weapons like the Glock 48. What’s interesting is that the G48 and G43X are both more or less a response to the capacity of the P365 mags .

However, they feature much longer grips. SIG seems to have wanted to show them up once more with the 365 XL.

P365 XL vs P365: Fit and Finish

Both the SIG P365 and P365 XL wear the famed Sig P365 Nitron finish. The Nitron finish is a rugged and dependable finish that does an excellent job of resisting corrosion and abrasions. The finish is strong and I can testify to that with lots of use for my personal P365.

It’s a matte black but has a greyish tint to it. It looks professional, and it’s applied with attention to detail.

There are no telltale signs of where the finish is applied or unevenness in its application. It’s smooth and looks great. SIG uses stainless steel as the metal under the Nitron finish so you have a second strong layer against corrosion resistance.

The black polymer frame is well constructed and there are plastic molding spots showing where the mold comes together.

The slide does wear a P365 designation and on the XL variant, you see an XL designation as well. The black polymer frame also has the SIG SAUER name descending vertically which I really like. Like the P320 series, the P365 uses an internal chassis that allows for you to remove the ‘firearm’ from the grip module.

This allows you to swap frames and even purchase custom frames with various finishes. This is a simple system that works and seems to work well. This could also potentially allow you to run a SIG P365 standard slide on an P365X frame and vice versa.

Sig P365 XL Specs vs Sig P365 Specs

Sig P365 XL VS Sig P365: Which is better for concealed carry?

Sig P365 Dimensions

This is the category that will solve the Sig P365 XL VS Sig P365 debate for most of you.

Specs are where we can spell out the real differences between the two guns. Obviously, the XL moniker means this is a slightly larger gun, but how much larger is the golden question. The P365 was already an ultra-concealable gun.

The standard P365 has a 3.1-inch barrel and an overall length of 5.8 inches. It’s a short and sweet gun. The sig p365 width is only 1 inch wide, and 4.3 inches tall with the standard 10 round magazine. It’s about a tenth of an inch long with the 12 round magazine. The gun weighs only 17.8 ounces as well. Overall, it’s pocket pistol sized and very small.

It’s very similar in size to the Springfield Hellcat and only very slightly larger than the Glock 43. By the way, we have excellent comparison reviews for those 2 handguns as well. Our Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365 and Glock 43 vs Sig P365 comparisons are the best reviews you’ll find for those handguns.

Getting back to the story at hand though, the P365 XL goes with a longer 3.7-inch barrel and an overall length of 6.6 inches. The gun also weighs 20.07 ounces and the flush-fitting magazine is the P365 12 rounder. Additionally, there is an available 15 round magazine that will extend the height a bit more. This P365 extended magazine is a nice add-on for the gun. Speaking of the height, it’s 4.8 inches tall with the stock 12 round magazine.

These are very different guns, but they are both small for their class. The P365 is very tiny compared to guns like the Glock 26. The same goes for the P365 XL. The P365 XL’s nearest competitor is the Glock 19, with its 15 round P365 xl magazine . However, the P365 XL is shorter, lighter, and thinner than the Glock 19. In fact, it rivals their Glock 48 in size, while offering 2 to 5 more rounds.

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365: Ergonomics

The SIG P365 is one of the most ergonomic small guns out there. The grip is just long enough to fill the hand and the undercut design of the trigger guard allows you to grip quite high on the gun. It’s designed to be easy to use and easy to handle. To me, it’s the ultimate compromise between concealed carry comfort and easy shooting.

The P365 XL takes those levels of awesome and moves them around. The P365 XL gives you an even longer grip that is easier to get even the biggest hands around.

The longer slide gives you a longer sight radius making it easier to shoot more precisely at longer ranges. It’s much more comfortable to shoot, but also a little harder to carry concealed.

The thin grip is one of the better on the market. It’s more round than squared and fits the hand incredibly well. Both guns are well suited for hands both large and small.

The P365 XL comes with a straight, flat-faced trigger that makes it easier to reach for people with small hands. The XL trigger pull is the same in terms of weight but will feel shorter and break when the straight trigger is at a 90-degree angle. This is a superb add on, and I’d love to see the standard P365 adopt it as well.

Outside of grip length and trigger, there isn’t much difference between the guns ergonomically.

The controls are the same between the standard models. The standard P365 does have a version that features a thumb safety, the XL model does not. The P365 and P365 XL are both ergonomic and well planned out weapons.

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365: Features

The P365 debuted as a feature-filled gun. It came from the factory with a 10 round flush-fitting magazine, as well as a ten round with a pinky extension. At launch 12 round magazines were also available.

The gun comes with SIG XRAY3 night sights that are honestly an awesome touch. The gun was rated for +P ammunition, and of course, the option of a manual safety version is a preference for some. The manual safety also makes it legal in MA.

Both guns feature a reversible magazine release, and standard right side only slide locks.

Could the P365 XL make it even better? Yep, it sure can. We mentioned already the superior flat-faced trigger on the P365 XL. It gives you more trigger control and it has a shorter trigger reach. Outside of that, you are still getting the overtly awesome night sights as a stock option. You are also getting two 12 round magazines with optional 15 round mags coming out soon.

Beyond that you are getting the feature that sold me on the gun, a milled slide cut for a red dot. A red dot optic is an awesome addition to a carry gun. The P365 XL will feature a milled slide to accommodate the new Romeo Zero optic or the Shield RMSc Red Dot. A red dot on a handgun makes it easier to shoot faster, further, and more accurately. It takes some training to utilize correctly, but once you learn it it’s hard to go back to just irons. This feature alone could solve the Sig P365 XL VS Sig P365 debate for those of you that love red dot sights.

The Romeo Zero release will be released around the same time as the P365 XL. The slide plate contains your rear sight and positions the optic quite far rearward. The P365 XL will also have a slightly longer beavertail that grants you greater control over your weapon and makes it more comfortable to fire.

The grip also has an integrated carry magwell to make the gun quicker and more intuitive to reload.

If you have big hands like mine, the standard P365 can be tricky to reload. This integrated magwell allows you to reload without the risk of your hand pinning the magazine in place.

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365: Shooting Characteristics

One of the most pleasant surprises about the P365 is how easy it was to handle. It didn’t slap and kick the hand, which is rare for a pocket-sized 9mm. The P365 is a great gun. It has some recoil and muzzle rise, but it is still plenty controllable. The P365’s small beavertail even prevents slide bit, another rarity for such a small gun.

In fact, we have a video of the P365 in action in our Sig P365 review and it performs very well.

The P365 XL isn’t in reviewer’s hands just yet, but from personal experience, the gun will be easier to shoot. The longer grip will offer more control over the weapon.

The beavertail will help you fight muzzle rise with no effort on your part. The longer barrel will give you a slightly longer sight radius, or if you rock a red dot that won’t matter. Either way, you’ll be able to easily reach out and hit your target a bit easier with the bigger gun.

As I mentioned offering more grip will make reloads easier, and that is perfect for a gun built around such a thin and capacity filled magazine.

Both guns are comfortable, but the P365 XL will be more comfortable. It will be easier to fire faster and with more control.

The X series trigger is also going to be lighter and present an overall smoother pull. The XL will be the more comfortable shooting firearm and its size and increased features are major advantages.

This all being said if you are happy with your P365 you don’t need to rush out and grab an XL. The standard P365 is a well thought out and well-designed gun for concealed carry. The design is rock solid, but making it a little bigger is going to make it more controllable. Clinger Holsters has definitely sold a ton of P365 Holsters.

Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365: Ease of Concealment

The P365 XL is without a doubt the harder weapon to conceal. There is no way a bigger gun is easier to conceal than a smaller gun. The longer barrel and grip requires you to try just a bit harder to conceal the weapon.

That all being said, it is a very compact weapon and as a compact weapon, it’s still easy to conceal. The gun itself is still compact by most standards and it’s also thin, especially for its size. To me, it seems to be perfect for strong side IWB or OWB carry. Many people carry guns this big, or even bigger, in appendix though.

The P365 standard model is quite a bit smaller. It’s just small enough to be concealable via pocket carry. Albeit if you are going to pocket carry it you’ll need to have larger pockets. Most ladies pockets won’t allow you to conceal a gun like the P365.

The P365 standard is my go-to for appendix carry. It’s small enough to be comfortable wherever I carry it. It’s comfortable when I’m seated and comfortable when I’m moving and grooving throughout my day.

Both the P365 and P365 XL are well suited for everyday carry. Smaller framed individuals will likely be more attracted to the P365 than the P365 XL. The P365 XL would likely be my choice because I’m a big guy with big hands. Either way, both guns are an excellent choice for concealed carry. They are thinner and easier to carry than a gun the size of the Taurus G3C. The Taurus G3C vs Sig P365 is a very interesting comparison though!

Clinger Holsters has plenty of Sig P365 XL holsters options available.

Final Thoughts

Both the SIG P365 and P365 XL are designed from the ground up to be easily concealed guns. The SIG P365 and P365 XL are not necessarily competitors, but guns that compliment each other.

The SIG magazine style is ultra-efficient and the P365 XL is an awesome way to take advantage of that mag design in a bigger gun. So there doesn’t have to be a Sig P365 XL VS Sig P365 debate. You can get both and be ready for any concealment needs that might pop up. Sig P365xl price is around $599.99 – $649.99 at the time of writing this review.

These guns can be carried with ease in either design, and are super lightweight, thin, and they both pack a punch. The P365 XL isolates you to the 12 round and 15 round magazines, and the standard P365 allows the use of 10, 12, and 15 round mags.

With either design, you can maximize your loadout ammo wise. The SIG P365 series stands heads above its competition and I’m curious to see how SIG will continue to push the platform.

Deciding between the Sig P365 XL vs Sig P365 may not be an easy decision. Choosing the most comfortable, best concealing holster is very easy though. Clinger Holsters has you covered.

Shop gun holsters now

Sig P320 XCOMPACT Review

Sig P320 XCOMPACT Review (with pictures)

Sig P320 XCOMPACT Review

The SIG P320 could have just been another Glock wannabe. It would have been a perfectly fine, and perfectly capable striker-fired pistol in full-sized, compact, and subcompact models. Chamber them in the big 3 self-defense calibers and call it a day. SIG didn’t do that with the Sig P320 XCOMPACT.

Instead, SIG tossed the full weight of their behemoth sized company behind the gun. They ran headfirst into their gun and have released tons of different models, different frames, magazines sizes, optic’s cut models, and more.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Front Slide Serrations

The SIG P320 went from your average striker-fired handgun to a massive selection of guns with options for everyone. One of the best in the P320 line is the XCOMPACT.

You know, for years the Glock 19 was considered the end all be all of the compact carry guns. It struck a chord with shooters because of its combination of size, shootability, and capacity. It appears SIG with their XCOMPACT wants to unseat the Glock 19 from the throne.

What’s the X Mean?

The X series of SIG guns is their elite series. The X series started with a longer barrel, tuned SIGs in the all-metal P series. With the P320 it’s begun to lean more towards combat handguns.

These guns share the same fire control unit as the average P320, but it features a wide variety of upgrades that refine the weapon and makes it more ergonomic, easier to shoot, and more comfortable overall. Think of the X Series as the premium versions of the P320 series.

The P320 has several guns in the X series line and the XCOMPACT is the second of the X series designed for concealed carry. The X-Carry was the first. The XCOMPACT is a bit shorter in both height and length. Overall as a premium grade gun, you are getting a wide variety of outstanding features.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Beveled Mag Well

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Fit and Finish

The P320 XCOMPACT features SIG’s Nitron finish over a stainless-steel slide. The combination of the finish and stainless steel make this gun very rustproof in general. The Nitron coating itself is a matte black and applied lovingly. The Nitron finish looks incredibly slick and is applied evenly across the slide of the gun. 

What I like is that everything matches. The sights are the same shade as the gun, the gun has a slide cut and the top plate is also the same exact color as the rest of the gun. We aren’t playing 50 shades of black with this gun and it calms me, to say the least.

The XCOMPACT’s polymer frame is also a matte black with aggressive styling to it. The grip features the SIG logo and is classy and stylishly done. It all looks like it was planned out and executed flawlessly.

The parts fitment is also top-notch. I have an ergonomic complaint, but that will be for later. The way the parts move together is impressive. The magazine release glides in and out of the gun. The slide lock is loose and moves easily. The slide glides rearward like it’s on ball bearings and best of all it takes little effort to do.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Low Profile Slide Catch

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Specs

The P320 XCOMPACT has very basic specs that honestly hide how awesome this gun is. The XCOMPACT has a grip that I describe as just right. It’s just long enough to comfortably fit both of my hands.

The overall height of the weapon is 5.3 inches total, and the grip conceals a 15-round magazine.

The gun is only available in 9mm, but the P320 series, in general, can be customized and converted to a variety of calibers. 9mm is the perfect round for compact guns in my opinion, and this makes the XCOMPACT easier to shoot and it utilizes ammo that’s affordable and common.

The P320 XCOMPACT has a 3.6-inch barrel and an overall length of 7 inches. What I can really appreciate about SIG is how far they push the sights rearward and forward.

Pushing them back this far allows you to utilize as much sight radius as humanly possible. The more sight radius you have the easier it is to shoot your gun accurately.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Rear Sight

The gun is surprisingly thin, not quite Victoria Secret thin, but close. Most single-stack guns are around 1 to 1.1 inches thick, but the X Compact is only 1.3 inches thick. This extra quarter-inch gives you double the capacity.

Weight wise the gun is 25.3 ounces, which is pretty standard for a gun this size. It does look heavier than it is, and it is a bit surprising when you pick it up. Overall the gun is still very compact and is designed for carrying.

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Ergonomics

Oh my, I have a lot to say and almost all of it is good. I have one complaint and it seems universal between me and SIG pistols. The slide lock is placed so far back my thumbs sit on it and this prevents the slide from locking to the rear after firing the last round.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Side View

This is universal with all the SIGs I own, have owned and have handled. From the P365 to a West German P220, no matter what I do, I press down that lockdown and it never works as designed. That’s the downside to the ergonomics of the gun (for me).

The upsides are many. First, the grip fits my hand like a glove. It’s mostly smooth with a small wave for the middle finger. The undercut under the trigger guard is nice and high and this allows that excellent high grip. At the top of that grip is a beavertail which allows for a high grip free from slide bite.

The beavertail allows shooters to maximize control over the gun. This helps fight muzzle flip and make firing the gun more comfortable, especially when round counts start to get a little higher. This entire grip combo is called the X Series grip and is unique to this weapon.

Moving forward we have the Flat X Series trigger. Flat triggers offer a few advantages. First, it reduces the reach from the grip to trigger which accommodates shooters with smaller hands.

The flat trigger, at least to me, has always given me more trigger control.

This model also breaks once the trigger is perfectly 90 degrees and is very predictable. The flat trigger design is also incredibly comfortable when it comes to shooting high volume. Nothing rubs or irritates after a few thousand rounds.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Flat Trigger

The SIG X Compact offers front and rear slide serrations. They are curved rearward just slightly and are quite sharp and aggressive. They are very easy to grab and dig in well to your hands. This is especially true when it comes to wearing gloves or having wet hands. They aren’t comfortable, but when it comes to serrations they shouldn’t be comfortable. They should be easy to grip.

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Features

The X Compact comes with the aforementioned XCOMPACT grip module. It’s fantastic in terms of that. The slide is also a special X Series slide which is outfitted with a slide cut.

This allows you to mount a SIG Romeo1 optic. Red dots on handguns are becoming a big deal and it’s easy to see why. They allow you to shoot further and faster with more precision overall.

The Romeo1 isn’t currently offered as a package deal, but SIG has done RX models in the past and I wouldn’t be surprised to see a future package deal.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Cutout

The Sig P320 XCOMPACT slide also comes with the X-RAY3 day and night sights. These sights are fantastic. They are by far some of my favorites. Let’s break them down. First, the front sight features a green ring wrapped around the tritium bulb. This green ring is bright and easy to see, and you can pick up the front sight very fast.

The rear and front sight all feature tritium bulbs that glow brightly as the sun sets or the lighting gets low. These glowing sights allow you to pick up front sight quickly as well.

This combination day and night sight makes it easy to confidently shoot regardless of your situation.

Additionally, the X Compact has a true Picatinny rail and you can add a light or laser system.

As a P320 it features a removable chassis called a fire control unit. This is what’s considered the actual firearm and you can move the FCU from gun to gun. You can also customize the P320 quite easily due to the FCU. 

You can also use the 17 and 21 round magazines available for the P320 full-size standard and full-size X series in the compact model at the sacrifice of size.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Under Cut Trigger Guard

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Shooting Characteristics

Shooting this gun is a real joy. The trigger is brilliant and provides a very smooth and consistent pull. The reset is odd, not bad, but odd. It’s nice and short as it should be, but it also has a thump, a very big thump, that lets you know its reset.

Of course, this is a post-P320-drop-firing-fiasco and it features the trigger upgrade system. I’m not sure if this affects the reset, but you know for sure that the trigger is reset.

The recoil is very mild and comfortable, and the beavertail makes a big difference in controlling the gun. Especially when it comes to rapid-fire. Get a nice high grip and that beavertail will help keep the muzzle down.

As I mentioned before the grip is the perfect size for two-hand shooting, even for me and my 2XL sized hands. I love how comfortable this gun is and my hand wraps around it just perfectly.

I will say the gun feels like it’s perfect for more petite shooters. It’s relatively thin, the trigger reach is short, and the slide is easy to rack rearward. This makes it a winning combination for smaller shooters.

The front sight is easy to pick up, even from the draw. It’s bright green and very quick to pick up and get on target. As a gun made for concealed carry, it’s made for close-range shooting so the speed is of the essence.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Front Sight

It’s suited for close-range shooting but excels at long range. At 50 yards even, an amateur shooter will be able to put some lead on a man-sized target without much difficulty. The bright and clear sights combined with the excellent trigger and grip make accurate shooting very possible.

The XCOMPACT isn’t just easy to shoot, it’s fun to shoot. It feels good and makes you feel good because it’s such an easy gun to shoot.

Sig P320 XCOMPACT: Concealment

It’s a small gun that’s kind of big. In a world of pocket pistols, this gun seems huge but with the proper Sig P320 XCOMPACT holsters, it’s plenty easy to conceal. It’s also comfortable to carry. I would suggest a holster with a sweat guard because those serrations may rub the wrong way without it.

Sig P320 XCompact Concealed Carry Holster Kydex and Durable Concealment

At 1.3 inches wide, it’s not too tough to accommodate most shooters. It won’t be carried in the pocket, but it can be comfortable for IWB or Appendix carry.

Specifically, a smaller shooter could easily pair appendix carry and the XCOMPACT. You could even add a Romeo1 Pro and keep the package relatively small.

The XCOMPACT is a great carry gun and is well suited for daily carry. It takes a good holster and belt combo, but it can be done and can be incredibly comfortable.

The Sig P320 XCOMPACT is a rock-solid concealed carry gun and combines the features of a duty gun and concealed gun to make an excellent combination. 

Final Thoughts

The SIG XCOMPACT is an awesome gun for concealed carry and gives shooters an amazing carry gun. It’s a premium gun that is priced to be damn affordable. It offers options most of us would turn to the aftermarket to get.

The Sig P320 XCOMPACT is for the very pickiest of shooters or those who don’t want to bother with upgrades. If you want premium right out of the box, then the Sig P320 XCOMPACT has you covered. Not convinced? Check out our detailed analysis of the 50 best concealed carry guns on the market today to find your perfect concealed carry gun.

Glock 43X VS Glock 43

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 (with pictures)

Glock 43X vs Glock 43

Are you deciding between the Glock 43X vs 43? We will compare and do a Glock 43x review vs the Glock 43 review to help you decide between 43x vs 43. 

Glock can often be a step behind the concealed carry market for better or worse. We will cover all the ins and outs of these guns in this Glock G43x review.

If you’re looking for a full Glock 43X MOS review, we have that on our blog as well.

The bad news is they can take their time getting out a little single stack 9mm to compete with literally every other manufacturer on the market. The good news is they take their time, and when it comes to building a new gun, they seem to always work.

The glock43 premiered to great critical acclaim, and it became one of Glock’s most popular handguns. The 43 was the first 9mm, single stack, subcompact pistol Glock has ever released. The Glock 43 was an instant winner in the concealed carry market, and it has now sold over a million different models.

The Glock 43X is the newest in the Glock family and is a bit of an oddity. To under the X series, you have to go back to the 19X which was the weapon entered into Army’s new handgun program. The 19X lost but became a popular handgun selling over 100K in a year. Due to the amazing Glock g43 reviews, the Glock 43 has now sold over a million pistols.

Combine the two, and we get the new Glock 43X. The G19X is a Glock 19 compact slide on a Glock 17 full-sized frame. The Glock 43X uses the same G43 slide and barrel, but an extended frame that offers a full-length grip.

Both guns are compact, both are 9mm, and both are Glocks, so which gun is better? More importantly which is better for you?

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 has a longer grip

Glock 43x vs Glock 43: Fit and Finish

The Glock 43 dimensions make it an adorable mini Glock. It’s styled almost exactly like any other Glock, just shrunk in size. It’s shorter and thinner than any other 9mm Glock. It lacks finger grooves completely and only features rear serrations. Glock guns are best described as Spartan. They are simple, but effective in appearance. The frame is of course polymer, and the slide is all black and sports a black nitride Glock 43 slide finish.

The black nitride finish has proven to be extremely strong and very durable. Glock pistols are used by police and military forces around the globe, and you don’t hear complaints about the finish. It will shrug off wear and resist corrosion and rust in general well.

The finish is rugged, and while plain it does work. This is a great finish for a gun that’s likely going to sit tight to your body and in a holster most of its life.

The Glock 43X went an entirely different direction, and you are seeing something that distinguishes itself well from the Gloxk 43 dimensions. The G43X uses an nPVD coating that is also proven to be strong, durable, and to resist corrosion.

The most significant difference is that the PVD finish is silver and gives the gun a distinct look. It makes it stand out from the standard all-black Glock. Additionally, the G43X has forward slide serrations that are missing on the standard Glock 43 dimensions.

If I had to choose a gun based just off the fit and finish it would be the 43X Glock . I’m a sucker for the stainless look, and this new gun looks great. The finish is also rock solid and does give it a unique look in the world of Glocks.

The Glock 48 is another Glock with the same look and feel as the Glock 43X; it’s just a touch bigger. We have a full Glock 48 vs Glock 43X comparison on our blog too.

Glock 43X vs Glock 43 Longer magazine holds more rounds

 Glock 43 Specs vs Glock 43X Specs: 

While these guns are very similar and even share a model number, they are entirely different. The G43X is larger by the G43 size comparison, and this is due to the increased grip length. The G43X is 5.04 inches tall, and the G43 is a shorter 4.25 inches.

This gives you more grip with the G43X as well as more than the G43 capacity. The Glovk 43x holds ten rounds plus 1 in the pipe. The G43 holds six rounds with one in the pipe.

The shorter grip also makes the weapon much easier to conceal, and this gives you an edge when it comes to having a smaller body type or wearing lighter clothes. Weight-wise surprisingly the G43X is barely heavier, I mean a fraction of an ounce. The G43X weighs 18 ounces, and the Glock G43 weighs 17.99 ounces unloaded. Once loaded we see a much bigger difference between 10 and six rounds.

The G43X weighs 23.07 ounces loaded, and the 43 weighs 20.64 ounces. One interesting difference is the width of the G43X vs the Glock 43 width. It’s .04 inches thicker than the G43. It’s an odd addition, but a one that’s present.

The G43 and G43X are both still small guns with a G43 barrel length of 3.41 inches, and the Glock x43 is longer with an overall length of 6.5 inches. The Glock 43 overall length is of 6.26 inches.

The smaller design and lighter G43 weight certainly make it more appealing to those who have difficulty carrying a larger gun. The micro nine could even be a pocket gun. The G43X is better suited for those who like an easy to shoot the gun. We cover all about this in this Glock G43 review.

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 10 round capacity

Glock 43x vs Glock 43: Ergonomics

Picking one up out of the box will lead most to say the G43X is better in the ergonomics department. It’s longer grip fills the hand and prevents you from having a pinkie hanging off the end of the grip.

It’s very similar to the Sig P365XL in this regard. Even though it’s a very thin grip, it’s still long enough to give you a full grip. You can find our  Sig P365XL vs Glock 43X comparison on our blog.

This makes the gun feel more comfortable and more ergonomic in general. It’s easier to hold, to point, and to aim. The bigger g43 grips grips give you something more to grab than a standard grip and makes the gun easier to draw.

That being said once you holster the gun that bigger grip becomes a bigger gun to hide. The Glock 43 dimensions make it easier to conceal and with the right magazine with pinky extension can be comfortable to sit in your hand.

Does the Glock 43 have a safety?

Both guns have reversible magazine release buttons for right or left handed shooters, as well as rear slide serrations, a trigger safety, and a lovely little slide lock.

I’m not a big fan of the Glock slide lock and find it too small and to easy to press down with a proper grip. The G43X does have front slide serrations that the G43 does not have. The G43X also has a beavertail built into the frame that I love.

These things feel great in our modular and durable Glock 43X holsters and Glock 43 holsters.

The standard Gock 43 has a bad habit of eating up my hand with slide bite. The addition of a beavertail on the G43X adds a layer of protection between your hand and the slide. I never caught slide bite when shooting the Goock 43X. The beavertail also adds another level of control to the gun, especially where muzzle flip is concerned.

One final difference is the trigger distance. The new Glock G43 has a shorter 2.56-inch trigger distance compared to the G43X’s longer 2.64 inches.

Another factor to consider is hand strength. An interesting tidbit is that people with reduced hand strength have an easier time racking the G43X since they have more of a grip to grab. Also, the slide seemed to be just a bit easier to rack than the original Glock 43 gen 4.

Glock 43X vs Glock 43 Grip Height

Glock 43x vs Glock 43: Features

The G43 was Glock’s first dig into the single stack nine category, and as a small gun, it’s not heavy on the features. It still has Glock’s safe action system with three different safeties, as well as the Glock polymer magazine. The G43X and G43 share most of the same features.

This includes the already mentioned reversible magazine release, Glock target sights, a Gen 5 smooth groove-less grip, and an overall low profile.

The Glock 43X does happen to have the Gen 5 marksman’s barrel. This is a match grade barrel that has proven to be exceptionally accurate and reliable.

The G43X will also have a high visibility follower that is quick and easy to see when checking to see how loaded a magazine is. The witness holes make it easy to see the bright orange follower.

Additionally, the Glock 43X has forward slide serrations we don’t commonly see on Glock pistols (although many people believe that Glock will start incorporating them on more pistols).

Neither gun will have a rail but speaking with Crimson Trace I found out the Laserguard designed for the G43 will fit on the G43X. Sadly aftermarket magazines that fit the G43 will not fit the G43X, and the G43 will not be able to accept the longer G43X magazines. The Glock 43x caliber is 9mm luger.

This is a little sad but it’s unavoidable in this case. Glock had to widen the magazine in order to cram 10 rounds in it. That’s why they’re not compatible.

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 Slide Serrations

Glock 43x vs Glock 43: Shooting Characteristics

Just from looking at each gun it’s pretty easy to see which shoots better. A bigger grip means more control over the gun which results in less felt recoil and easier follow-up shots.

Without a doubt, the G43X is super easy to control and much easier to control than the G43. The beavertail is another excellent addition that aids in the control of the gun and keeping it on target.

The Glock 43 gen 3 is still pleasant to shoot and controllable enough for defensive use. There is simply a big difference when it comes to the G43 and G43X. The shorter grip leads to decreased control over the gun. It will often feel like the gun is trying to escape your grasp via wiggling during rapid-fire slowly. Recoil is still comfortable and far from painful even with this little gun.

Regarding the long-range shooting, both guns perform well for tactical applications. When you slow down and take your time, the difference in grip size doesn’t make a significant difference. The guns are both quite accurate, even with those terrible Glock plastic sights.

Reloading the G43X is easier since you have more to grip on the magazine and because the grip clears my hand. With small guns, the magazine often gets caught on its way out and pinned by my palm. This isn’t a problem with the G43X due to its longer grip.

Both guns are reliable and will eat anything you decide to put through them. This includes high-end brass ammo and low-quality steel stuff.

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 Laying next to each other

Glock 43x vs Glock 43: Concealment

Here is where the smaller, technically longer, and shorter G43 wins out in. The Glock 43X dimensions, especially with the longer grip, does add bulk and bulk is always the bad guy when it comes to concealed carry. The G43X has a longer grip which potentially means more printing and an overall harder to conceal package.

The Glock 43 grip is closer in size to a Sig P365 grip than the bigger grip of the G43X. In fact, we’ve written an excellent Glock 43 vs Sig P365 comparison on our blog.

The G43 is small enough it can even be pocket carried comfortably. You can’t do that with the G43X. Both guns are quite thin, and this makes them perfect for IWB carry and plenty comfortable in that regard. The G43X and G43 are awesome appendix carry guns due to their short barrels.

Both guns are nice and light, so they don’t sag or cause undue hardship for daily carry. The G43 is the better choice for deep carry with all of the Glock 43 options, and if you are a smaller framed individual, I will go with the G43. Either gun will be a great piece for concealed carry and any kind of concealed carry holster.

Glock 43X VS Glock 43 - G43 is smaller

Conclusion

The Glock 43 has reigned supreme over the single stack concealed carry industry for quite some time. The gun is small, lightweight, easy to shoot, and as always is dead nuts reliable. It always goes bang regardless of what is going on.

How much does a Glock 43 Cost?

The Glock 43 is a simple, small, but capable gun. It’s made its way to a million produced and sold for a reason. Currently the G43 rules in terms of aftermarket accessories, including holsters. The smaller gun is easier to conceal, but harder to fire. It’s certainly better in the hands of an experienced shooter. The Glock 43 gun costs around $500 a piece. 

The G43X is beginner-friendly and still relatively small enough to conceal with ease. The G43X is much easier to shoot and to rack thanks to the longer grip. The longer magazine also gives you a ton more ammo than the G43, and this makes it a more combat-capable gun.

The Glock 43X is also the prettier and more ergonomic gun all at the cost of being harder to conceal. It’s an interesting tradeoff that each shooter will have to decide on for themselves.

Would I go off and sell my G43 gun to purchase a G43X? Probably not. But if I didn’t own a G43 and was in the market for a new gun, I’d choose the G43x over the G43. Both come with Glock’s outstanding level of reliability, and both are affordable options. You can also check the Glock 43x price to help you determine which is a better choice for you. 

If you’re looking for a dependable and modular gun holster for your Glock 43X vs Glock 43, check out our Glock 43X holsters and our Glock 43 holsters.
Glock 43X vs Glock 43 - 10 rounds vs 6 rounds

Glock 48 VS Glock 19

Glock 48 vs Glock 19 (with pictures)

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: A Detailed Review

Oh Glock, at one point everyone proclaimed the Glock 19 was the perfect concealed carry gun. Now perfect is relative as its a rather large gun compared to a pocket pistol like the Ruger LCR. However, it was an excellent size compromise. It was a compact gun that offered 15 rounds on tap in an easy to control package. The Glock 19 is by far the most popular Glock pistol, and the Glock 19X sold a 100k units in a year, so that says something. What other differences are between the Glock 48 vs Glock 19?

The Glock 19 is a massively popular gun from a massively popular company. It can’t get better, can it?

Glock could have rested on the Glock 19 as the end-all compact gun, but instead, this year they introduced the Glock 48. The newest Glock is very 19 like, but is much thinner and is a single stack gun. The Glock 48 premiered at SHOT Show 2019 and was at range day and on the floor.

The gun grabbed an immediate cult following of people who saw the benefits of the design. The Glock 48 is almost like an evolution of the Glock 19 but at the same different enough to gain its own number.

Can the Glock 48 upset the natural order of things and replace the Glock 19 as Glock’s perfect compromise for concealed carry? We’ll let’s take a peek at the two and find out.

Glock 48 VS Glock 19 Fit and Finish

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Fit and Finish

Glock’s are often described as Spartan, and that’s a great way to look at them. They aren’t designed to be sexy or stylish, and they are designed to work and work they do. This isn’t to say the guns are sloppy or aren’t professional. The Glock 19 comes with a standard nitride finish and is available in a stainless steel model.

The finish is evenly applied without odd portions receiving more or less coating. The blackened finish you find on most is well suited for both concealed carry and duty use. The finish is very hard and resistant to wear and tear.

It will resist holster wear as well as contact with sweat and moisture in general.

The traditional Glock finish is well proven and well made. The new Glock 48 is outfitted with a new finish called nPVD. This gives the gun a stainless steel appearance.

It certainly stands out and looks good. Is it tough? It’s not like we’ve seen Glock guns outfitted with the nPVD finish often. The nPVD finish has been used for years on different guns and is quite rugged and tough. The new finish is very nice and speaks to my love of stainless guns.

Each gun has a black polymer frame that’s rather plain and simple. The polymer is cleanly cut without lines or mold marks. The Glock frame is outfitted with simple stippling, and clean cuts to accommodate the gun’s controls. Both guns are clean-cut and well made.

The Glock 48 does have an nPVD finish that gives it the stainless appearance, and admittedly you can hunt down stainless Glock 19s. Both guns look good, are a tad bit boring, but the function is more important than form. In terms of form both the fit and finish are well done.

Glock 48 VS Glock 19 specs

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Specs

Here is where we see a major difference between the two guns. The specs are nearly completely different. All that said, there are a number of specs the guns are similar in. The height of both guns are identical and are each 5.04 inches tall.

They share the same length grip. The guns feature similar trigger distances: the 48’s is slightly short than the Glock 19s, but not considerably.

The Glock 48 is predictably slimmer. The slide is .80 inches thick, and the grip width is 1.10 inches. The 19 has a .13 inch wider slide and a .16 inch thicker grip. It doesn’t seem like a major difference, but when it’s pressed against your body, you feel it.

The biggest difference in these guns is the capacity. The Glock 48 comes with single stack 9mm magazines that hold ten rounds. The Glock 19 comes stock with 15 round magazines but can accommodate magazines up to 33 rounds.

The weight of the guns is considerably different. The Glock 48 weighs 25.12 ounces with a full magazine. The Glock 19 weighs a hefty 30.16 ounces when fully loaded.

The Glock 48 has a shorter overall length at 7.28 inches but has a longer barrel at 4.17 inches. The Glock 19 has a 4.02-inch barrel but an overall length of 7.36 inches.

Each gun represents its chosen role well, and the gun’s specs are on point from what they are and what they do.

Glock 48 VS Glock 19 width

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Ergonomics

Since the guns both feature very similar ergonomics, it may be hard to declare one or another as better or more ergonomic than the other. Both guns have grips that are perfectly long enough to fill your hand just right. You won’t find a hanging pinky on these guns.

The G48 is basically in its first generation. The Glock 19 is in its 5th generation so it can be tough to compare ergonomics without consideration for the correct generation. Since the G48 came out in 2019, I think it’s fair to compare the ergonomics to the Generation 5 Glock 19s.

Both guns have smooth, groove-less grips which to me are superior to the previous Gen 3 and Gen 4 grips in my opinion. The G48’s thinner grip is likely more comfortable for smaller hands overall. The trigger distance is shorter which makes it much easier for shorter fingers to reach the trigger.

The Glock 19 Gen 5 model incorporates an ambidextrous magazine release, and the Glock 48 does not. The Glock 19 also has a flared mag well for quicker and easier reloads. The Glock 48 does feature a full-sized slide lock that’s common in every other Glock handgun.

The Glock 48 does have forward slide serrations, a feature missing on standard Glock 19 (though not the Glock 19 MOS Gen 5 as seen in the photographs). The front serrations make it easy to rack the gun from the front or to do a press check.

Both guns do feature a magazine release that is reversible for both left and right-handed shooters.

Glock 48 VS Glock 19 magazine capacity

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Features

We could talk all day about the features of these two guns. The Glock 48 is a very small and ergonomic little gun that is honestly for comfortable and packed with features. This includes the Generation 5 marksman’s barrel. This barrel is match grade and enhances the accuracy of the gun.

The Generation 5 Glock, of course, has this same barrel. Magazine wise both guns also feature witness holes for every round and a bright orange follower that makes it easy to track the round count in your weapon.

Lastly, both guns use the Glock safe action system that provides three total safeties to prevent accidental discharge unless the trigger is pulled. These are all passive safeties, and the guns both lack manual safeties.

The Glock 19 does have an accessory rail that allows you to attach lights and lasers to your gun easily. The rail is a much easier system than the custom made options for railless guns. You can attach lights from any company that uses Picatinny rails, which is all of them.

The Glock 48 is rail-less, but this makes sense since the gun is designed for concealed carry and not for duty use. The Glock 19 works in both roles well.

Both guns are available with a variety of different sight options. This includes the stock Glock sights that are kind of junk in general. Additionally, you can buy high visibility Ameriglo sights and Glock OEM night sights.

The Glock 19 even have a model known as the MOS. MOS stands for Modular Optics System, and this allows you to attach micro red dot sights to your gun.

The Glock 48 also has an MOS version. An in-depth Glock 48 MOS review is available on our blog. Both weapons are easy to use and packed with all the modern features any modern pistol should have.

Is the Glock 19 better than the Glock 48?

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Shooting Characteristics

The Glock 19 is one of the easiest-to-shoot stock guns on the market. The big full-sized grip, long sight radius, and good trigger make it easy to hit what you aim at. The Glock 19 has been popular for long because it’s such an easy to handle the gun.

Ultimately the Glock 19’s features are the reason why the Glock 48 will be so popular.

The Glock 48 incorporates a lot of the same features of the Glock 19. The grip is the same, as is the sight radius and trigger pull. The gun is just as accurate and easy to shoot as the standard Glock 19.

When it comes time to put lead downrange both guns handle very well. With proper fundamentals, you will easily hit small targets quite rapidly. From a combat perspective after an hour of instruction, I can have a new shooter hitting a man-sized target at 25 yards.

When it comes time to reload the Glock 19 is slightly easier for a number of reasons. The magazines are thicker and easier to grab. Shoving a fresh one in the wider magazine well is also a little more intuitive. This applies to the Glock 26 as well. If you want to find out how the Glock 19 vs Glock 26 comparison shakes out, it’s available to read on our blog.

The Glock 48 is plenty easy to reload, and in a very short period of time, I can likely get just as fast as with the 48 as I am with the 19.

In terms of control, guns are simple and easy to control. This includes rapid-fire. The muzzle flip and rearward recoil are limited, and the guns are perfect for defensive shooting. Both guns are remarkably reliable, almost to a fault. It doesn’t matter how filthy they are, or how cheap the ammo is these guns will work.

Glock 48 vs Glock 19: Ease of Concealment

Without a doubt, the Glock 48 is the easier gun to conceal. It’s slightly shorter, thinner, lighter, and perfect for smaller people. The Glock 19 itself has long been the gold standard for concealed carry, and it still fits that role.

However, the G48 was what happens when you really no longer have to compromise between ease of handling and size. The G48 is a Glock 19 shrunk down as far as you possibly can.

The Glock 48 is perfect for IWB carry (in the right Glock 48 holsters) and adds a new layer into comfortable and concealed carry. The Glock 19, in my opinion, is better suited for OWB carry, but the right Glock 19 holsters make it an excellent IWB candidate too.

The Glock 19 is a great option if you want a concealed carry gun that’s outfitted with a weapon light and red dot optic.

The Glock 19 offers you those options if you want to go with a slightly bigger gun with more features. I carry a duty worth handgun is your goal then the Glock19 is the way to go.

If your goal is to minimize the footprint of the gun you carry without a performance sacrifice, the Glock 48 is the way to go. This thin, lightweight gun opened up new frontiers in the new concealed carry market.

Glock 48 VS Glock 19 Holsters

Conclusion

Choosing between the Glock 19 and Glock 48 would be difficult. I tend to glide more towards bigger guns, but my frame allows it. The Glock 19 does offer me the ability to rock both a light and an optic.

However, the Glock 48 will ultimately be lighter and easier to carry and doesn’t sacrifice a lot of the strengths of a Glock 19.

Glock’s new slimline pistols are truly amazing. If you’d like to read a Glock 48 vs Glock 43X comparison, that’s on our blog too.

Best of all the Glock 48 is perfect for states that ban magazine capacities of more than ten rounds. You get a gun that maximizes the ammo you can carry as well as a more efficient platform when you consider weight and width.

Either gun is bound to serve you well. They feature Glock’s amazing record of reliability, as well as their dead-simple controls, and massive aftermarket.

It’s tough to beat a Glock, but let us know what you think below between your Glock 19 vs Glock 48 decision.

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X (with pictures)

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X

Glock blew our minds when they added more Slimline Pistols to their lineup with the Glock 48 and Glock 43X.

More Glocks to choose from is always a good thing.

Glock has always been slow with introducing new guns, but in the last few years, they’ve stepped on the gas and propelled towards bringing out new guns every year. 2020 gave us the first introduction of two guns at one time, both sharing a ton of similar features. They are both thin, single-stack guns with a similar finish, and they are in the same caliber. Are you curious about the differences between the Glock 48 vs Glock 43X? Read on to find out all the details.

It was at the biggest firearms industry trade show in the world, SHOT Show that we got our first hands-on with both guns. At the Industry Day at the Range, we were able to put lead downrange with both guns, and later at the show, we could run our grubby little hands all over them.

I spent more time that I thought I would with both guns.

Admittedly neither pinged my interest before SHOT and I went to range day just to see what all the buzz was about. Now as a self-professed internet gun expert I am rarely wrong, but this time I was happily wrong.

With both range time and handling time down, I feel like we need to compare the two and identify the strengths and weaknesses of both platforms.

By the way, we have a full Glock 48 MOS review and a full Glock 43X MOS review on our blog too.

Glock 43X leaned on Glock 48

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Fit and Finish

Both guns are the famed polymer Glock frame. With standard Glock stippling. I am really glad they went with the Gen 5 grip without finger grooves. It seems to be a staple of the single stack series. It looks cleaner and more robust. The gun looks good and is lithe. They are identical when it comes to fit and finish. Glock is a master of mass production, and it shows in these two guns.

Everything is clean and well designed and well-cut. Both guns utilize the same exact frame, and the big difference is the slide. The Glock 48 overhangs slightly over the edge of the frame. Love it or hate that’s just how it is. Mass production is a lot easier when you are making one frame for two guns.

Both guns have a silver or stainless steel colored PVD finish. I spoke with Glock at SHOT Show, and the PVD finish was chosen for a couple of reasons. First, the finish is tough and extremely resistant to salt and corrosion in general. This is critical because the gun will be pressed against the body and exposed to sweat when it is being carried in deep concealment.

The finish was also chosen because it is eye-catching. Stainless always looks better than black, and the G48 and G43X are certainly eye-catching guns. They stand out in a sea of black slides and black polymer grips.

What’s also interesting in terms of fit is the presence of front serrations on the guns. Like the G45 this is a new addition that might become standard sooner than later.

Both guns look great, and the G43X may look better to some. The G43X’s slide ends at the frame, and this does present an overall cleaner look in my opinion.

Glock 48 and Glock 43 have the same size grips

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Specs

As similar as these two guns are they do diverge a bit more when it comes to their specs. They do share a few specs as well. For example, both guns have a 10 round capacity, and both guns are in 9mm.

They also both have the same overall height due to the fact they use the same grip, so they are both 5.04 inches tall. The same frame equals the same thin width at only 1.10 inches wide. It’s wide enough to grip and thin enough to conceal easily.

The barrel length and then the overall length is where we see a number of differences. The G48 is the bigger gun, and it has a 4.17-inch barrel length.

This is a little longer than a Glock 19 barrel and totals 106mms which luckily enough makes it long enough to import into Canada who has a 105mm barrel length requirement. The overall length is 7.28 inches.

The Glock 43X is identical to the Glock 43 when it comes to length. The Glock 43X has a 3.41-inch long barrel and an overall length of 6.5 inches. The shorter the barrel and slide mean you have a shorter overall sight radius, which makes the gun harder to shoot accurately.

However, the shorter slide and barrel means the gun weighs 2 ounces lighter than the larger G48. The shorter length also makes it easier to carry and slightly faster to draw.

If you compare these Glocks to the Sig P365XL, the G43X is a bit shorter than the Sig and the G48 is a bit longer. The G43X is closer in size to that Sig. We have a full Sig P365XL vs Glock 43X comparison on our blog if you’re interested in that article.

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Ergonomics

The Glock series of handguns all have very similar ergonomics. The longer grip of these two guns means they are easier to hold and easier to control. This makes the entire setup much more comfortable. Both guns also have a bit of a lip or beavertail to keep the slide from riding the hand and causing slide bite.

The magazine catch of both guns is reversible and can be set up for right and left-handed shooters. The design incorporates the standard Glock slide lock that’s actually somewhat small for any gun.

Neither pistol has a manual safety and instead, you get a small trigger safety that keeps the weapon from firing until the trigger is fully pressed.

Both guns have front slide serrations so you can press check the gun and double-check to see if there is a round in the chamber. On the Glock 48, the longer slide makes me feel more comfortable when it comes to press checks. It’s very easy to flag yourself with the 43X when you attempt a press check.

The larger grip makes it easier to eject the magazine in my opinion. With small guns, the magazine will often catch on my hand and fail to drop fully. The longer grip will allow you to drop the magazine freely. Beyond that, the overall design of both guns is well valued and suited for easy control when the weapons are fired.

While these new Slimline pistols can’t conceal quite as well as Glock’s G43, they are much easier to shoot. If you’d like to see an in-depth Glock 43X vs Glock 43 comparison, it’s available on our blog.

It’s also interesting to note that these new Slimline pistols are easier to conceal than Glock’s 19 while also having better ergonomics. Now that’s truly a win-win situation for Glock fan’s. You can see a full Glock 48 vs Glock 19 comparison on our blog as well.

The Glock 48 slide is longer than the Glock 43X slide

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Features

The Glock 43X and Glock 48 share the same features. The gun is not necessarily a known generation in the Glock world. Typically a Glock pistol will be part of one particular generation, and this ranges from Generations 1 through 5 with the 5th being the current generation. Glock models like the G42, G43, and now the Glock 43X and G48 fall outside of these typical generations.

Like the Gen 1, 2, and 5 models the G43X and G48 have smooth grips without finger grooves. This is a major improvement in my eyes. The guns lack a rail, but this makes sense because the guns are designed to be concealed carry guns. Lasers and lights add mass and weight to a gun.

The guns have the first built-in beavertail for Glock pistols, and Glock needs to incorporate this into every single one of their guns. It really makes these guns more comfortable to shoot. I hate slide bite, and Glock gives it to me, especially the small ones. The Glock 43X and Glock 48 will be equipped with the Generation 5 Glock Marksman barrel.

The Glock Marksman barrel is a match grade barrel that is exceptionally accurate and lends to the gun’s mechanical performance. The magazines are both ten rounders and have the same generation 5 high visibility follower.

This allows you to look through the witness holes of the rear of the magazine and see the bright orange follower.

The Glock 48 and Glock 43 have optional Ameriglo sights

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Shooting Characteristics

When I got my chance to hit the range with the G43X and G48 I was pleasantly surprised. I had fired the 43, as well as numerous pocket pistols and found the G43X and G48 to be pleasant shooters.

That longer grip helps reduce felt recoil which makes the gun so much more pleasant to shoot and to control. Shooting fast isn’t just fast, but it’s accurate as well. The beavertail included into the frame is an absolute dream and makes these guns a lot more pleasant to fire than most Glocks.

My main problem with Glocks is I get slide bite, and the addition of those grip beavertails is great, but they are bulky. The integrated Beavertail into the G43X and G48 need to become a stock Glock option. This beavertail also provides leverage when it comes to shooting and gives you greater control of the gun.

The Glock 43X has slightly more snap to it, and the shorter barrel has a bit more muzzle rise. It is noticeable but not uncontrollable. The 43X is still a straight shooter, and much easier to handle than the standard 43.

The Glock 48 is basically a single stack Glock 19, and this means its already superbly easy to control and to handle in general. It fits the hand brilliantly and is just perfect for my big hands. This gun shoots a little smoother and is easier to shoot accurately at longer ranges.

The Glock 48 is slightly easier to shoot, but the 43X is much easier to shoot than the 43. The 43X is, of course, the smaller gun so this isn’t unexpected.

Glock 43X in handGlock 48 in hand

Glock 48 vs Glock 43X: Ease of Concealment

The Glock 48 is slightly longer than the Glock 19, and I mean just a hair. These dimensions have long been considered the perfect compromise for a concealed carry gun and easy to control weapons. The Glock 48 is much thinner than the 19 and therefore it easier to conceal, especially when it comes to IWB carry.

However, when compared to the Glock 43X the Glock 48 is longer and heavier. The Glock 43X is the easiest to conceal, and more comfortable of the two. The shorter barrel makes IWB way more comfortable than the longer barrel of the 48. It’s incredibly easy to conceal in good Glock 43X holsters.

The Glock 43X’s shorter barrel doesn’t poke, especially when it comes to appendix carry. The G48 is great for IWB but to me its a better OWB gun (Clinger Holsters offers great Glock 48 holsters for OWB or IWB carry). The thin design of both guns makes them a solid and easy to conceal weapon.

When it comes to the magazines these small single stack guns have thin single stack magazines, they are very easy to conceal and carry. Toss them into the right pouch, and they’ll disappear on your body.

The larger grip of these guns adds a layer of complication when it comes to concealment. A larger grip is harder to conceal but makes it a lot easier to get a grip and draw the weapon from concealment. The 42 and 43 could be used as pocket pistols, but the 43X and 48 are much too large for that role.

If you want an easy to carry appendix carry option or you are a person with a smaller build go with the G43X, but if you want something easier to shoot that can be comfortably carried OWB and IWB then the G48 is the choice for you.

Final Thoughts

Glock’s newest foray into concealed carry guns has been controversial. The designs for both guns are different than most concealed carry pistols. They don’t try to be pocket pistols. Instead, they are concealed carry pistols that are also comfortable to shoot.

The pocket pistol genre is easy to conceal, but hard to shoot accurately. These guns are designed to be easier to shoot and easy enough to be concealed.

Their thin nature makes them comfortable to carry, especially in an IWB configuration. The Glock 43X and 48 are designed to take a different route than the traditional pocket pistol. The Glock 42 and 43 series are designed to be your traditional micro-sized pocket pistols, and the 43X and 48 are designed for those who want something a little bigger and easier to handle.

Glock handguns are built to last and are easily some of the most reliable guns on the market. A lot of people jumped out and hated the Glock 19X when it premiered, and yet they’ve sold over a 100K Glock 19Xs in a year. I don’t doubt the Glock 43X, and 48 will be big sellers.

In all honesty, my favorite is the Glock 48, and I might add one to my collection if Glock added an optic’s ready option to the G43X I might have to grab one of those too.

We hope that our analysis of the Glock 48 vs Glock 43X has helped you decide between two of the best concealed carry guns on the market. Looking for more CCWs to choose from? Read our analysis on the 50 best concealed carry guns here.

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 (with pictures)

SIG P238 vs Springfield 911

A Holistic Comparison

What a time it is to be alive and be a concealed carrier. At this point in the great concealed carry phenomenon, there are guns out there for every person of every size. There is no excuse not to carry a weapon, and if you search, you’ll find one that fits you. Two guns out there that exemplify ease of carrying is the SIG P238 vs Springfield 911.

Both are incredibly small guns, both built after the 1911 platform, and both are in 380 ACP. Does the question become which one is better overall? Can one be declared better? That’s a tough question, but let’s explore both guns and see how they stack up.

The SIG P238 is the slightly older brother in this race. When it premiered alongside the 938, the guns were welcome with open arms. Little mini 1911s in 9mm and 380 ACP small enough to pocket carry? Of course, the market was happy.

The 1911 design isn’t just proven, but an ergonomic design that is easy to learn and master. As an SAO gun, it promised a superior trigger to most pocket guns and an all-metal frame unheard of in a gun this small. It was an instant success, and SIG has since pushed out tons of different models that vary in both function and form.

The Springfield 911 is a new contender on the mini 1911 block. The name is clever, remove a one from 1911, and you get 911. Who do you call in emergencies? Exactly. Besides clever marketing, Springfield did produce an outstanding little gun that mimics the 1911 in many different ways.

The 911 rocks an ambidextrous safety, a stainless or blued slide, and everything about it is cut to be thin and lightweight. The Springfield 911 is an interesting entry into the concealed carry market and the first competition for the P238.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Kydex Holsters Comparison

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Fit & Finish

Both guns have a very sleek and lithe look to them. Small, thin, and adorable is the best way to describe them. The 911 comes in either an all-black finish or a stainless and black finish.

The SIG P238 comes in so many different finishes it’s hard to keep up. Black, stainless, FDE, OD Green, chrome, gold, Cerakote Texas flag, and so on and so forth. The P238 has more finish options than I feel like listing.

Regardless, the finish is also handsome on both guns. SIG And Springfield are a little vain but in a good way. You know you are going to get a solid and evenly applied finish.

Both guns look fantastic, and at their price point, they can’t afford to be. I’m weak in the knees for stainless guns, so both guns give me plenty to be excited about. 

In terms of fit and feel, both companies knock it out of the park. From the front to the back these guns are decked out and designed to work. On top of that, the controls are crisp.

The safeties are tactile and audible, the slide of the SIG feels like it’s on ball bearings and the 911 isn’t far behind on smoothness. Both guns are precision made, and it certainly shows.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Serrations Comparison

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Specs

As pocket pistols, is the competition which is smaller and lighter? The 911 and P238 are nearly identical when it comes to complete specs. The SIG does weigh a little more at 15.2 ounces compared to the 911’s 12.6 ounces. Both guns have a 2.7-inch barrel, are 5.5 inches overall, and both a hair under 4 inches tall.

They are remarkably similar pistols, and this is likely about as short as you can go with these guns. Both guns come with two magazines, one holds six rounds, and the other holds seven rounds. The seven rounder isn’t flush but features a pinky extension. This increases the height of the gun by just a bit, but not terribly so.

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Ergonomics

Both guns are 1911 like, but a lot of the design is only skin deep. They are 1911ish, but not 1911s. Neither features a grip safety for example. Both do feature manual safeties placed in a familiar and usual position.

These frame-mounted safeties are easy to reach and positioned perfectly to be defeated by the thumb. Your thumb will naturally fall where the safety lies, and it’s easy to defeat with the thumb.

The Springfield 911 comes with built-in ambidextrous safety. The SIG P238 comes in either a standard right-hand safety, and there are also certain models that feature ambidextrous safeties.

The Springfield’s safety is thin and small, with a shelf that’s easy for the thumb to catch. The SIG safety has a little more mass to it and is just as easy to find.

Performance-wise I only noticed one small difference. The SIG safety is a bit more intuitive when it comes to putting the safety back on. It was a little easier for my fat thumb to get under and flick up.

Both guns have short grips, and what else do you expect from a pocket pistol? Both have 7 round magazines as an option with a small pinky extension. The extensions make the gun easy to hang onto with the full hand. I hate a hanging pinky, so the 6 round flush magazines don’t get much play. I like the extension, and it makes the whole system more comfortable.

The 911 offers fantastic looking and feeling G1 grips. These are thin, but tough and provide a solid grip with a nice overall aesthetic. There are models with Viridian laser grips that are a little thicker and pack a red dot laser.

The SIG P238 comes with Hogue wrap-around grips on most standard models, and these are fully functional. They are comfortable, work well and help with recoil distribution into the hand.

There are so many other models of the P238 you can find just about any grip material you want. Metal, wood, G10, Mother of Pearl, and likely plenty I’m forgetting.

Both guns feature a similar push-button magazine release, and both are pretty much the same. You get rear slide serrations, as well as large slide locks. The slide locks are both well done and quite wide. They are easy to reach and activate.

One thing I love about both guns is just how easy they are to rack. Pulling the slide rearward is very easy to do, especially if you thumb the hammer back before racking the slide. This makes both of these guns a great choice for shooters with bad hand strength.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Close Up Comparison

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Features

The Sig P238 packs in two magazines, one hold seven rounds and has a pinky extension and one has six rounds and fits flush in the gun. The SIG comes with full-sized SIG NITE sights that glow quite brilliantly as the sun is setting. The SIG P238 is a small, but capable gun that’s designed for EDC, so night sights are an important addition.

Springfield took a few pages out of SIG’s book, and it comes with both a 7 round magazine with a pinky extension and flush fit 6 round magazine.

They followed them with the addition of night sights too. Springfield used Ameriglo Night Sights. They do feature brightly colored plastic inserts that make it easier to use the gun during the day. It’s a nice touch and a slight step above SIG.

Both guns have very similar outer and inner features. They both only have rear serrations, they are both SAO guns with light triggers, and both guns are designed for concealed carry.

The Springfield has a unique G10 trigger for better or worse, but I see no issues with it. Springfield also includes an ambidextrous thumb safety standard with the 911, and only some SIG models have an ambidextrous safety.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Width Comparison

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Shooting Characteristics

The words pocket-sized 380 often incite a certain cringe on the hands of those who’ve shot such little guns. Most people impression of a pocket-sized 380 comes from the Ruger LCP, the S&W Bodyguard, and other micro 380s that feature polymer frames and hand slapping recoil. They also often feature long, double-action triggers and minimal sights that make them a hassle to shoot.

The good news is neither the SIG P238 or the Springfield 911 possess such unfun features. The SIG P238 is the softest shooting pocket pistol I’ve ever fired, and the Springfield 911 is the second softest.

That little extra weight the SIG makes a slight difference when it comes to range time, but both guns are enjoyable to shoot. Recoil is less of a snappy high five and more of a gentle push rearward.

The light and short single-action triggers are both excellent. The SIG’s metal trigger feels a little more polished and slides with less grit. The Springfield 911’s G10 trigger is nice and clean, but you can feel that polymer isn’t as smooth as steel.

Both guns wear nice and big sights that are easy to see and well beyond what you usually get with a pocket 380. These are proper handgun sights that are quick and easy to align. This makes an appropriate sight picture possible and easy to obtain.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Grips Comparison

Both guns are modern and reliable with a variety of ammunition. This includes ball and JHPs. As a modern defensive pistol, you can’t afford it to choke, and neither gun chokes easily. They both digest, chew up and spit out everything you can put through it.

Both guns offer a generous beavertail that prevents hammer bite but does allow a nice and high grip. The downside is for guys like me. As a guy with a 2XL glove size, my hands tend to catch the slide here and there. This slide bite is uncomfortable, but I can deal with it.

The magazines of both guns aren’t the fastest to remove and reload. It is a pocket pistol, and some expectations have to be realistic.

These aren’t duty guns and aren’t designed for extended firefights. They are designed for realistic and typical defensive scenarios that require little to no shots ever fired.

On the range, these guns are fun to shoot, are a blast to train with. Very few 380 pocket pistols can say that.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Grips Comparison 2

Sig P238 vs Springfield 911: Ease of Concealment

Both guns are not only small but lightweight, at least lightweight for their metal frames. Their design makes them inherently thin, but there are a few areas that can be snagged easily.

They do of course need a safe and reliable holster. However, they are effortless to conceal. Even the most petite person can stash one of these guns with relative ease. They are also insanely easy to hide in almost any style of dress short of a Speedo.

One of the most universal ways to carry a small gun is appendix carry. Pocket carry is excellent, but appendix carry is a bit more intuitive, and a lot of women’s jeans don’t even have pockets.

The V3 Stingray by Clinger Holsters is one of the best Sig P238 holsters you’ll find, albeit we are a little biased. In addition, our durable Kydex Springfield 911 holsters are about as small and lightweight as you’ll find.

I feel it does at exemplifying the best parts of the Springfield and SIG. It’s lightweight, thin, easy to conceal and comfortable. While your 911 or P238 protects you, the Stingray will protect your gun.

Conclusion

Once the brass has hit the floor and the range is clear which model is better? Aye Yi Yi that’s a tough question. The P238 has been around a bit longer, so accessories and magazines are a little easier to find, but the 911 is going to be catching up shortly. Both guns are reliable, easy to shoot and look amazing.

Sig P238 VS Springfield 911 Barrel Comparison

I’m partial to the SIG because of how many different finishes and special models there are. This is purely a vanity choice. Regarding fit and function, both guns are perfectly capable of saving your life, defending your family, and being a fun gun to maintain proficiency with.

The best thing about the SIG P238 vs Springfield 911 is the fact you don’t have an excuse not to carry one. They work for any size person in nearly any form of dress. The only thing you’ll have to leave behind is your excuses.

Are you looking for a durable and modular gun holster for your new SIG P238 or Springfield 911? Check out our Kydex holsters here that will give you a lifetime supply of use.

Walther PPQ VS HK VP9 Debate

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 (with pictures)

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9

A Detailed Review

The world is filled with plastic fantastics. Plastic fantastic is an often affectionate name given to polymer frame, double stack, striker-fired guns that are usually 9mm, but 40 S&W also qualifies. What started with the success of Glock has become the success of the entire industry. Every company who’s a serious contender produces some form of plastic fantastic, including HK and Walther and their great models between the Walther PPQ vs HK VP9.

These European heavyweights are immensely popular companies that both have a reputation for quality firearms that feature a level of refinement above their competition.

Both also produce or have produced a wide variety of striker-fired firearms. The striker-fired flagships of HK is the VP9 and Walther’s flagship is the PPQ.

Both guns have proven to be fantastic weapons, and as pistols, they are on a different level than most striker-fired, polymer-framed, handguns.

The HK VP9

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Comparison Serrations Details

For some time the famed German firm Heckler and Koch did not produce a striker-fired pistol. In the 80s and 90s, they were big fans of the concept and invented the first polymer frame striker-fired pistol.

However, they dived into the more successful DA/SA market for an extended period of time. The introduction of the VP9 took the gun market by storm, and the low relative price was immensely attractive to HK fans and new shooters.

Immediately the gun was embraced by the gun-buying public. It became an instant hit, and the market welcomed the VP9 with open arms. German police forces adopted the VP9, Luxembourg police forces, and even a number of US police departments have adopted the gun or approved it for duty use.

Of course, as the people’s pistol and civilians have widely adopted it with a sweet tooth for striker-fired HKs.

The VP in VP9 stands for Volkspistole, which means the people’s pistol. The price and simple design make it a gun most people can shoot with ease and can afford.

The VP9 holds 15 rounds of 9mm and sports an ambidextrous magazine release, interchangeable grip panels, an accessory rail, and no manual safety.

The VP9 series has expanded into the VP40 in 40 S&W, and the VP9SK, a compact model of the VP series, and the VP9 Tactical with a threaded barrel and suppressor height sights.

Walther PPQ

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Holsters Comparison

Walther is often the name synonymous with James Bond and the PPK. If you were to say the words, “I have a Walther,” most people assume the PPK. However, the PPK is a bit outdated for a duty pistol, and Walther has kept themselves up to date.

The PPQ is the current flagship Walther design and is meant for police use, concealed carry, and home defense.

The Walther was based on the P99QA, but it eliminated the double-action portion of that design. This partially cocked single action striker is simpler and more comparable to most modern striker-fired guns. Additionally the gun sports a re-designed grip, trigger guide and slide.

The gun is well known for its impressive ergonomics and the comfort most users feel when gripping the gun. The Walther PPQ has become a favorite competition pistol due to its reliability, trigger, and ergonomics. It’s an extremely well-made gun with a reputation for refinement of fit and finish.

PPQ stands for Police Pistol Quick Defense, and this is in reference to the trigger design being single action only.

The PPQ holds 15 rounds of 9mm and has interchangeable backstraps, and comes in M1 and M2 models. The M1 features a paddle magazine release and the M2 features a reversible button release.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Mag Release Comparison

The PPQ series comes in 9mm, 40 S&W, 45 ACP, and 22 LR. There is the standard model, as well as the sub-compact. The gun also comes in barrel lengths ranging from 4, 4.2, 4.6, and 5-inch models. Some wear extended barrels for competition and others to attach a suppressor to it.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Fit and Finish

Both the PPQ and VP9 are made to be working guns. These are the guns you’ll find in the Walther PPQ holsters and HK VP9 Holster of cops and soldiers, so they are prepared for practical purposes. That being said both features a tough Tennifer finish so you won’t have to worry about the Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 in this instance.

Tennifer is insanely resistant to saltwater and corrosion in general. It’s a durable finish that has no problems with sweat, saltwater, or resisting scratches and scraping. It gives the end-user a matte black look.

HK does take it a step further with their Hostile Environment finish that lays down a polymer coating with the Tennifer. This makes it less prone to gouges, scrapes, and scratches.

Outside of the functional nature of these weapons, both guns look great. The finish is applied evenly and gives these guns an overall smooth finish. HK and Walther both pride themselves on not cutting corners and these guns show it.

The VP9 is more angles and rectangles, and the PPQ is rounder around the edges. Both guns have tasteful roll marks displaying both the name of the company and the model of the pistol. Walther’s scroll has always been the gold standard as far as I am concerned.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Paddle Mag Release Comparison

The guns both have unique, eye-pleasing grip stippling, as well as clean-cut serrations in the slide. The weapons are both refined and well made. This means everything locks into place with little to zero play, and the parts are slop free.

HK has a slight advantage with their poly coat, but both guns look and feel great.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Specs

The HK VP9 sports a 4.09-inch barrel, with a total length of 7.34 inches. The gun is 5.41 inches tall, and 1.32 inches wide. It rocks a 15 round magazine and weight 25.56 ounces with an empty magazine.

The VP9 uses the same magazine as the hammer-fired P30, so magazines are widely available. The HK VP9 comes with both front and rear slide serrations, a Picatinny rail for accessories, and a wide variety of side, front, and rear grip panels to adjust the gun to your hand.

The bore has polygonal rifling with six grooves in a right-hand twist. The barrel is cold hammer-forged and made from cannon grade steel. It will last forever, if not forever, longer than you.

The Walther PPQ M2 has a 4-inch barrel and an overall length of 7.1 inches. The gun is 5.3 inches tall, and 1.3 inches wide. It fires from a 15 round magazine that is compatible with the older P99 magazines. The gun weighs 24.5 ounces empty and also sports rear and front slide serrations.

The gun has three interchangeable backstraps for different grip sizes. The barrel is also cold hammer forged and utilizes polygonal rifling.

If you were just to read the specs, the two guns seem to be twins. They are quite similar, and when two companies are trying to produce an affordable, well-made weapon that fulfills specific roles, then you can bet there will be overlap.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Ergonomics

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Ergonomics Comparison

Here is where battles can be won and lost in the gun world. How does a pistol feel? How do the controls work? These are all critical questions, and often the winner is which one feels better in your hand.

We’ll talk objective facts, but at the end of the day when you pick the gun up is when you figure out if it fits you.

Both guns do feature overtly ambidextrous controls. The PPQ M1 or “Classic” sports the same paddle release as the VP9 which is inherently ambidextrous. On top of that, both guns wear ambidextrous slide releases. Neither gun has a manual safety, and they both have trigger-based safeties.

The PPQ M2 has an American style push-button magazine release, and it can be moved to the left or right-hand side. It’s not genuinely ambidextrous, but configurable for any user.

HK just released the VP9-B which also features a button release that is reversible. Speaking of configuration, the guns both feature customizable grips.

The PPQ comes with three backstraps to adjust the gun to different hand sizes. The VP9 goes a step further and gives you three backstraps and six grip panels for an impressive degree of customization.

The slide release on the Walther PPQ is one of my favorites. First off, its massive and easy to reach and use with bare hands or while wearing gloves. It’s also positioned so that a high, thumbs forward grip won’t disable the slide lock. The HK VP9 gives me the same problems SIG’s do, and that’s my thumbs resting on top of the slide lock instead of alongside it. This prevents the gun from locking back on the final round.

As mentioned before both feature front and rear slide serrations. The VP9 does have wings. By wings, I mean raised portions on the rear of the slide. These provide a better grip and make the gun easier to rack. This can be invaluable for those who have terrible hand strength.Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Charging Handles Comparison

The way a gun feels in hand is the most subjective thing there is. To me, the Walther PPQ sets the bar for comfortable handguns. Its grip fits me perfectly, and I find it immensely satisfying. That being said the VP9 grip is excellent, I have no specific complaints about it. I merely like the PPQ a bit more.

Both companies place a lot of time into making a comfortable grip that allows a high hold on your gun.

Both guns have a nice trigger undercut, a great beavertail, and nice palm swell.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Features

Both the VP9 and PPQ have Picatinny rails for lights, lasers, coffee makers and other accessories. The guns also feature full-sized sights with standard three-dot and night sight options available depending on the model.

HK Produces the VP9 in black, FDE, OD Green, and grey. The PPQ is produced in black, OD Green, Tungsten, FDE.

I do like the fact the grip panels on the PPQ are black, and I think it offsets and looks excellent with the FDE, OD Green, and Tungsten models.

The VP9 has an enlarged heavy-duty extractor that functions as a loaded chamber indicator which is a nice feature. The PPQ does come standard with an adjustable rear sight for zeroing purposes.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Shooting Characteristics

These guns both handle amazingly well. The high grip you can achieve helps fight recoil and muzzle rise. Both guns sport light striker-fired triggers that make double taps and rapid-fire easy and controllable.

The trigger on the Walther PPQ is likely the greatest stock trigger ever placed on a striker-fired handgun. It’s light, short, creep and grit-free. It can easily take you by surprise and make something like a Glock trigger feel immensely heavy. Its 0.1” trigger reset is brilliant.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Holster Ergonomics Comparison

The VP9 trigger is a little stiffer, but not by much. It’s smooth and grit-free, it just requires about 1.5 pounds more pull than the PPQ. The VP9 trigger is refined and comes in second place concerning stock triggers, and striker-fired guns.

Both guns have nice combat style sights that make getting on target easy, and accuracy is top-notch. You can almost split hairs with these guns. The sights, the triggers, the grip are all aligned to bring the most accuracy you can squeeze out of their hammer-forged barrels.

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9: Ease of Concealment

These are both full-sized guns, but with the right holster, they can be concealed carried comfortably. The Walther’s rounder edges may feel more comfortable when it comes to IWB options.

Concealing IWB may be slightly uncomfortable, and will likely require you to go up a size in pants. Concealing OWB will be more comfortable, but it may be harder to hide the gun.

The V3 No Print Wonder lets you figure out which works well for you by allowing you to choose OWB, Appendix, or traditional IWB.

Since they are double-stack guns if you were looking to carry an extra magazine, the Mag holster is likely your best bet. It’s supportive of those 15 rounds of 9mm.

Final Thoughts

Walther PPQ vs HK VP9 Concealed Carry Handguns Comparison

I love living in America because I don’t have to pick and choose what gun I want. As long as I have the funds, I can purchase both. However, if I could only have one which way would the cookie crumble?

Honestly, I’d go with the PPQ M1 or Classic model. I prefer the paddle release over a button. That being said the HK Vp9 is an outstanding gun, and I wouldn’t feel under-gunned with it.

What do you folks think between the Walther PPQ vs HK VP9? Let us know which model you would choose and why. If you are also looking for a dedicated Kydex holster to secure your concealed carry handgun inside, we recommend you check out our concealed carry holster here.

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 (with pictures)

Glock 43 vs Sig P365

A Detailed Review

Sig’s Fat Mag vs Glock’s Single Stack 

The Glock 43 vs Sig P365 are two of the most popular concealed carry pistols on the market. Which one do you have?

The Sig P365 is a new category of pistol that came out of the left field.Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Side by Side Comparison

The Glock 43 is so popular, Glock has sold over a million of them in under 3 years.

These pistols are destined for an epic rivalry.

  • They’re both about the same size. 
  • The Glock 43 dimensions hold 6+1 rounds of 9mm and provide Glock loyalists with an easy to conceal package. 
  • The Sig P365 dimensions hold 10+1 rounds of 9mm in an impossibly small pistol size for the amount of firepower it holds.

I’ll explain how Sig accomplished their capacity miracle. 

I’ll also delve into Glock’s loyal fanbase.

If you could only have one, which would it be?

The Sig P365 Mystery Solved: How They Did It?

It’s either low capacity or bigger gun…right? Not anymore.

Sig Sauer engineers performed a miracle. 

They created a pistol the size of a single stack subcompact pistol with the capacity of a double-stack subcompact pistol.

The Sig P365 really is very close in size and weight of the Glock 43. Yet it really has the capacity of the Glock 26! 

They really did it. Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Barrel Length Comparison

Sig Sauer helped Concealed Carriers all over the country realize that dreams really do come true. You can leave your house with a comfortably small handgun without feeling inadequately armed.

With the extended mag, you have 12+1 rounds on tap of 9mm. That’s adequate protection!

Before I explain how Sig accomplished the impossible, let’s open up the full picture of just how groundbreaking the Sig P365 is and what the landscape looked like before it’s epic entry.

Subcompact Pistol Evolution

The pistols that changed the Concealed Carry landscape 20 years ago were double stack subcompact pistols. 

Companies like Glock were chopping their double-stack pistols down in size and capacity to accommodate Concealed Carry. It proved to be very successful for most handgun companies.

These new pistols packed up to 10 rounds of ammo and were between 1&1/4” and 1&1/2” thick. And your pinky was usually left dangling in the wind. 

Most new guns sold to American civilians were limited to a 10 round capacity.

This new “reasonable” ammo count was due to evil politicians such as liberal extraordinaire, Dianne Feinstein. 

Because the ammo count was limited to 10 rounds, engineers started designing much smaller pistols (why tote more pistol than you can utilize?). Thankfully the law expired in 2004 but the smaller pistol trend stuck.

A few years back, pistol engineers started building even smaller single-stack subcompact pistols to further accommodate Concealed Carry. These pistols usually had a capacity of 7-8 rounds of 9mm. 

They were about the same size as double-stack subcompact pistols; only thinner. They were usually about an inch thick.

While most Concealed Carriers would prefer 10 rounds over 7, many decided to carry the smaller single stack pistols because they were just plain easier to conceal.

We had no choice, right?

If we wanted to carry a smaller pistol, we had to give up a few rounds.

Well, we have a choice now. We can have decent capacity and single stack size in one package: The Sig P365.

So how did Sig Sauer do what nobody else even attempted?

How Sig Sauer Did It

Let’s break it down.

  • Slightly modified Double Stack Magazine
  • Mag has tapered aggressively at the top
  • Really thin mag well walls
  • 10th round is crammed in tight

It really is that simple. 

That’s why I’m adamant that other pistol manufacturers will follow suit.

Let’s break out the measuring stick.

The Glock 43 is 22 millimeters thick at the slide.

The Sig P365 is 22 millimeters thick at the slide.Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Slide Width Comparison

So far so good.

The bottom of the Glock 43 mag well is 22 millimeters.

The bottom of the Sig P365 mag well is 24 millimeters.Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Slim Size Comparison

(Some other Single Stack pistols are 24 millimeters thick too.)

Both mag well walls of the Glock 43 added together = 5.5 mm

Both mag well walls of the Sig P365 added together = 4.0 mm

(Some Single Stack pistol mag well walls add up to 7mm)

The Sig P365 now has 3.5 mm to play with.

Guess how much wider the Sig P365 mag is than the Glock 43 mag? If you guessed 3.5 mm, you’re a genius!

Sig Sauer has another advantage. They don’t coat their mags in plastic-like Glock does. Glock has less space inside their magazines because the walls of the magazine itself are thicker.

Which do you think customers will care more about?

  1. Thicker mag well walls and magazine walls.
  2. More capacity.

Based on the enthusiastic reception the Sig P365 has received, I think it’s safe to say most people haven’t even thought about how thick a magazine’s walls should be.

People care about capacity, concealment, and how well it shoots above all else. The Sig P365 checks all 3 boxes.

The Sig P365 shoots well because of its great trigger, sights, and ergonomics.

So far, it sounds like the perfect Concealed Carry pistol.

There are over a million people who would claim the same for the Glock 43 though.

Let’s take a closer look at the Glock 43 to find out why it’s been selling like hotcakes since its introduction. 

The Glock 43 Phenomenon: Fanatical Popularity Is Justified

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Barrel Length Comparison

What Does Glock Do Better Than Anyone Else?

Above all else, people trust a Glock to go bang; no matter what. Glock doesn’t sell pistols. Glock sells peace of mind.

Glock’s reliability is never questioned.

Glock makes utilitarian tools that just plain work. They are aren’t pretty or fancy. They don’t have thumb safeties. Simply pull the pistol out of the Glock 43 holster and pull the trigger. 

It’s incredibly simple to operate.

Glock makes self-defense tools first and foremost. The Glock 43 is no exception. It shares the same design that police and military have used for decades.

Thirty years ago, Glock pistols were called unsafe because they used a striker-fired trigger with a 5 lb. trigger and no manual safeties. Fast forward a few decades and most pistol manufacturers make pistols this way today. 

Glock’s foresight was obviously spot on.

While Glock’s overall design hasn’t changed that much over the decades, Glock has improved reliability, accuracy, and ergonomics through five generations of designs.

Glock took everything that makes a Glock special and crammed it into a tiny gun that’s easy to conceal and shoots well. The Glock 43 makes concealing a Glock pistol easier than ever before. (So does the Glock 42 but that’s a story for another day).

The Glock 43 basically has the same trigger, sights, and grip angle as its bigger brethren. Heck, it even has the same design language. It sports the familiar texture and front strap (no finger grooves) from the latest Gen 5 Glock 19 and Glock 26.

Glock was pelted with requests for years from their loyal fanbase to bring Glock’s interpretation of a Single Stack Nine to the market. People who are fanatical about Glock’s pistols up until this point were forced to carry other pistol brands when their Glock 26 wasn’t small enough.

Many people who carry Glock prefer to run only Glock pistols. They all operate exactly the same. They have (mostly) the same trigger feel and grip angle as well. Many of them even have interchangeable parts and magazines.

Plus, they have that militaristic aura that emanates confidence. Glock pistols give you the feeling that you don’t have to question it’s reliability. It’s a Glock.

Both of these pistols are looking great so far.  Let’s break out the magnifying glass and line them up side by side in a Glock 43 vs Sig P365 breakdown.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Compare And Contrast

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Specs Side by Side Comparison

While there are many similarities between this Glock 43 vs Sig P365 comparison, there are differences aplenty to point out.

For starters…

10+1 is obviously desirable over 6+1. 

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Mag Capacity Comparison

If you’re confronted with more than 1 attacker, 7 bullets is a frighteningly small number of bullets to protect your life with.

Consider that in most police shootouts half of the bullets miss the intended target. Also, consider most bad guys take 2-3 bullets to stop.

Those stats make a Glock 43 look adequate to stop ONE attacker in a worst-case scenario. I like to base my survivor scenarios on worst-case scenarios (that’s why I carry a backup pistol).

If you have 11 rounds of 9mm on tap, you’re statistically barely able to repel two attackers.

Did you know that almost half of the scenarios that require a self-defense response involve two or more attackers? 

Dirtbags like to run in packs.

The Sig P365 absolutely dominates all other pistols in this size class of pistols when it comes to capacity.

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Extended Magazines Holster Comparison

Capacity is the single biggest draw to the Sig P365.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Sights

Glock gives the G43 the standard polymer Glock sights. 

Nobody loves Glock’s sights – although most will tolerate them enough to not bother upgrading them.

Sig gives the P365 amazing (steel) night sights. It comes standard with XRAY3 Day/Night sights. Not only are these very high-quality sights, but they also perform great in bright or dark settings.

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Height Comparison

The XRAY3 sights do not require a light source to charge them. They will glow even if they’ve been sitting in a gun safe for 2 years.

These are the type of high-quality sights that many Glock owners will add to their pistol. The fact that they come standard on the Sig P365 is yet another explanation to the Sig P365’s immediate popularity.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Ergonomics

Both are great! 

The Glock 43 dimensions have the steeper grip angle that they’re known for. Neither grip angle is necessarily better than the other. But of course, you’ll shoot the Glock 43 better if you’re used to shooting Glock pistols.

If you’re not used to Glock’s steeper grip angle, you can still shoot the Glock 43 proficiently. It’ll just take some practice to get used to it. The Sig P365 has the usual grip angle that you’ll see on most pistols.

Both pistols feel great in the hand. Of course, this is a very subjective opinion.

It’s always important to ensure a pistol “feels right” in your hand before purchasing it.

Sometimes you’ll pick up a pistol and it feels like the pistol designer consulted with you before finalizing the design.

Other times you’ll pick up a pistol and sneer as you think about how disgusting it feels in your hand.

You’ll really want to pick them both up and see how they feel to you in order to subjectively judge their ergonomics.

I personally find that both of them fit my hands great. The Sig P365 fits my hand just slightly better but only if I handle them one right after the other. 

If I pick them up on separate occasions, I’ll swear that’s the one that feels best in my hand.

If you want to compare the Sig to a slightly bigger gun, check out our Taurus G3C vs Sig P365 comparison.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Fit & Finish

Not to sound like a broken record but… both are great.

However, the Sig P365 seems to be a little higher quality than pretty much any compact polymer pistol on the market.

Sig has a knack for creating pistols that ooze quality.

That’s not to say that the Glock 43 doesn’t feel like a quality handgun. It most certainly does.

The Sig just feels a little higher quality. It’s more closely comparable to Springfield’s Hellcat. You can read the full Springfield Hellcat vs Sig P365 comparison for more details.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Trigger

The Glock 43 has a typical Glock trigger. It’s not amazing. However, it does have a great reset. The reset is easy to feel and hear.

The Glock 43 dimensions make the trigger feel spongy while it’s moving toward the break. But once you hit the wall right before the break, you’re golden. It’s a pretty clean break.

The Sig P365 has an amazing trigger right out of the box. It has very little creep (you don’t get that spongy feeling that’s on the Glock 43). The break is very clean and nice. The reset is just as good as Glock’s.

The Sig trumps the Glock in the trigger department.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Features

The Sig wins this department too, but it’ll cost you. The sig does have more features but it’s more expensive.

But it very important to point something out in our Glock 43 vs Sig P365 comparison.

If you pay to upgrade your Glock 43, it’ll cost more than the Sig P365.

The night sights alone will set you back about $100 to add to the Glock 43. They’re standard on the Sig.

Let’s look at some other features you’ll get on the Sig P365 that are missing on the Glock 43.

The Sig P365 comes with front slide serrations (useful for press checking). The Glock 43 has the usual boring Glock slide.

The Sig P365 has a factory optional extended mag that ups the ammo count to 12+1.

The Glock 43 has a few aftermarket options for extended mags. However, they don’t quite look like they belong on the pistol.

If you want an upgraded Glock 43 and you’re ok with a slightly bigger handgun, you’d be wise to check out the Glock 43X.

You can read a full Glock 43X vs Glock 43 comparison on our blog.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Capacity

Normally, you wouldn’t see capacity in the “Features” section of a gun writeup. However, nothing is normal about the Sig P365. 

The Sig P365’s #1 feature is its amazing capacity.

Glock 43 vs Sig P365 Mag Options Comparison

With the extended magazine, the Sig P365 has more rounds than the Glock 43 or even the Glock 26. In fact, it’s only 3 rounds short of the venerable Glock 19!

The Sig P365 is definitely more feature-rich than the Glock 43.

Glock 43 vs Sig 365: Ease of Concealment

They are both pretty darn close in size and weight. Although the Sig P365 is just a touch shorter.

The Sig P365 will be just a bit heavier fully loaded because it holds more bullets. But if you want it to weigh less than the Glock 43, you could always load the mag halfway (said no one ever). Your Sig’s slightly heavier loaded weight won’t be noticed in great Sig P365 Holsters though.

The Glock 43 and Sig P365 are incredibly easy to conceal. You can still conceal their big brothers though: the Sig P365XL vs Glock 43X debate is still raging on as well.

However, it’s hard to find a gun as concealable as the G43 or P365.

Conclusion

Get the Sig P365 unless you’re a Glock fan.

The Glock 43 is an amazing pistol for Concealed Carry. Especially for Glock fans.

It’s small, reliable, and a great shooter. If you’re used to Glock’s, it’s a no-brainer. The Glock 43 has the same feel as it’s bigger brethren.

The Glock 43 is also every bit as reliable as its Glock heritage suggests.

However, if you’re not stuck on Glocks, the Sig is hands down the better choice here. 

You can also read our full Sig P365 review if you want to keep reading about how awesome the P365 is.

Almost twice the ammo in a smaller package…nuff said!

The Sig P365 also has a better trigger and sights. It does cost a little more but the upgrades are more than worth the extra $50 – $100.

So, depending on the Glock 43 vs Sig P365 debate, which do you have or what to purchase soon? If you pick one up, be sure to check out our durable and modular Kydex holsters that are adjustable for multiple ride heights and cant angles.

Glock 17

Glock 17 vs Sig P320 (with pictures)

Glock 17 vs Sig P320

A Detailed Comparison

Have you heard of the Glock 17 vs Sig P320 debate?

The current handgun market is really based around the polymer framed, striker-fired pistol, most often in 9mm. 

Why?  Because of the mighty Glock 17. 

The Glock 17 has been kickin’ around for over 30 years and is still one of the preeminent duty and defensive handguns. 

The SIG P320 is aiming to change the game by being the first truly modular handgun system. 

The P320 is trying to take what Glock did right and push into an easily customized and converted system. Both guns have undoubtedly changed the landscape of the modern duty pistol. 

The question ultimately comes down to, which is better? 

When SIG Sauer introduced the P320 jaws dropped. SIG made their name of their P22X series of guns. These famous pistols were all metal frames and hammer-fired. 

The P320 flipped all that on its head with a striker-fired, polymer-frame pistol. The P320 was based on the P250, a modular pistol system that was a hammer-fired DAO gun. The P320 was immediately successful, and the world quickly learned what a modular pistol could do.

Glock 17: The Legacy Begins

Glock 17 vs Sig P320 - Concealed Carry Comparison

The Glock 17 is the full-sized 9mm variant of the famous Glock pistol lines. The gun currently serves the FBI, and the Gen 4 variant is in service with the British Military. 

The Glock 17 gains its name from being the 17th patent from the Glock company. Prior to handguns, they produced a variety of military training tools. 

Gaston Glock gathered a variety of handgun experts to produce the Glock 17 to compete in Austrian handgun trials in 1982. 

The Glock 17 won. 

The Glock 17 beat out designs from HK, Beretta, and SIG Sauer. Glock came out of nowhere and their immediate success made the firearms industry take notice. 

Glock went on to be adopted by Swedish and then Norwegian forces, and eventually gained their own NATO stock number. 

In the United States, the Glock became a divisive gun. It was commonly called Tupperware, and combat plastic in a derogatory way. Some accusations even claimed the Glock would melt if you left in on your dash on a hot summer day. 

Side note, who leaves their gun on the dash of their car? These tall tales were ultimately untrue. 

Glock succeeded though, and their pistols quickly became the gun of choice for hundreds of state and local law enforcement entities as well as being the gun of choice by numerous Federal Agencies. 

The merits of the polymer frame, striker-fired gun were apparent. 

If you walked into SHOT Show and threw a stick… 

I’d place money on you hitting a striker-fired, polymer frame pistol and it’s all because of Glock. 

The Glock 17 is in its 5th Generation and there are numerous submodels available. This includes optic’s ready models and special edition guns designed by specific firearms instructors. 

While the Glock 17 was the first pistol that legitimized the striker-fired polymer pistol, they are most certainly not in a niche market anymore.

Almost every handgun manufacturer makes these types of pistols now.

Let’s look at one of the latest success stories: the Sig P320.

Sig P320: The Warrior’s Pistol

The P320 has a much shorter history because it’s a much newer gun. 

The P320 was introduced in 2014 but has quickly made a name for itself. A lot of new striker-fired polymer pistols premier and are labeled the ‘Glock-killer,’ but they never reach that same level of popularity. 

The P320 may be the only gun to have a serious chance of being an actual Glock killer. 

The P320 is a striker-fired, polymer frame gun that’s available in a variety of sizes and calibers. Glock and SIG designate their weapons in different ways. 

A P320 can be in 9mm, 40 S&W, and 357 SIG. 

Glock has guns in those calibers as well, but they get their own numerical designation. For this article, we are going to talk 9mm versus 9mm. 

The P320 most famously won the Army’s XM17 Modular Handgun competition in 2017. 

This made it the Army’s next service handgun and following the Army’s adoption the Navy, Marines, and Air Force all followed suit.  The P320 is a modular pistol and the portion that is serialized and considered the firearm is a small fire control group. 

This FCG is easily removed and allows the user to swap gun sizes, grip modules and more with ease. This includes the ability to swap calibers between 9mm, 40 S&W, and 357 SIG. 

Let’s dive into some facts no one can argue, and that’s the specs of both weapons.

Glock 17 vs Sig P320: Specs

These specs are taken from the respective gun manufacturer’s websites. 

Glock 17 vs Sig P320 - Concealed Carry Specs Comparison

As you can see these guns are very similar in both size and weight. 

The same goes for capacity, width, barrel length and more. 

This makes them hard to really contrast when they are so easy to compare. 

Both guns are outfitted with an accessory rail for adding lights and lasers. Both are essentially duty sized designs, and perfect for home defense and law enforcement. 

The Glock 17 and Sig P320 will even work for concealed carry if you’re willing to dress around these larger pistols.

While many CCW folks prefer carrying small to medium-sized pistols, others don’t want to give up the benefits of a duty sized pistol.

You can easily conceal these pistols… you just need the right Glock 17 holsters and Sig P320 Holsters. 

At Clinger, we have three options for both guns, and this allows you to try a variety of different carry methods. My favorite is the No print Wonder V3 in case anyone cares.

The SIG comes with two magazines from the factory, and it does come with SIG Lite Night sights. The Glock Gen 4 and Gen 5 models do come with three magazines versus the SIG P320’s two magazines, but standard sights. It’s an odd trade-off but should be noted. 

Glock 17 vs Sig P320: On the Range

In my experience, both guns are easy to shoot, feature low recoil, and are both very accurate.

My experience is limited to a Gen 4 Glock 17, and the new Gen 5 Glock’s do feature a higher-end Marksman’s barrel that may enhance accuracy. 

My P320 experience is limited to renting one at the range, but I’ve recently purchased an FCG and plan to build my own as a side project. The P320 does feature a slightly better trigger pull in my opinion. 

One of the best things about the Glock trigger is the audible and tactile click when the trigger resets. This is a feature many guns try to replicate, but rarely can. 

SIG comes close but still doesn’t beat that Glock reset.

The SIG’s slide lock is very SIG like, which means a bit of a pain for guys with big hands like me. Using a thumb forward grip my thumb often rides on top of the slide lock and this prevents the slide from locking back after the last round is fired. 

I don’t have this issue with the Glock. 

Both guns are incredibly reliable, and function with every type of ammo I’ve ever run through them. 

If you want an easy shooting, simple gun that just functions they both will get you there. 

There is certainly some subjective factors like grip angle, sight style, etc that you’ll need to evaluate for yourself. 

Glock 17 vs Sig P320: The Modularity Battle

One of the major factors in what makes a gun successful is its modularity. 

How can you tune it to make it a better gun for you? 

The SIG P320 immediately seems like the winner of this battle. You can easily swap frames, barrels, and slides to make completely different pistols. 

The SIG P320 was made to be modular, but the Glock 17 became modular along the way. 

Glock can be slow when it comes to adopting new technology and producing new designs. 

The truth is… 

They are victims of their own popularity. 

The aftermarket has made Glock firearms very modular. Different slide designs and even frame designs make the Glock 17 a very modular gun. 

You’ll have to jump through more hoops for sure, but you can make your Glock 17 into something that hardly resembles a Glock 17. 

SIG does have some aftermarket support, especially when it comes to triggers, sights, and other small parts. Their aftermarket is growing, but it’s nowhere near the popularity of the Glock aftermarket. 

SIG does have simplicity on its side when it comes to making adjustments and tuning the gun for you. 

Kitchen gunsmiths with Dremels and checkering kits can absolutely ruin a P320 frame and for 50 bucks you can just buy a new one. So I will say the SIG has 1 point more to modularity than the Glock 17. 

Glock 17 vs Sig P320: The Logistics War 

We talked about the Glock aftermarket when it comes to gun parts like frames, but the aftermarket doesn’t end there. 

Glock has a major edge in logistics when it comes to magazines, holsters, sights, and everything else. 

Down to the smallest parts, like magazine base plates, Glock simply has more. Off the top of my head, I can count a half dozen different companies who produce magazines for the gun. 

There are dozens of companies making sights for the gun. When it comes to holsters it’s the same thing. 

The Glock 17’s popularity makes it a very easy gun to find parts, accessories, and holsters for. Since there is so much competition out there the prices for these accessories is quite affordable. 

SIG is gaining a larger market share, but it’s still very small compared to Glock’s market dominance. Maybe over time, we’ll see this change, but it’s unlikely the P320 will ever top Glock. 

The most Sig can aim for is being tied with Glock in terms of aftermarket support and logistics. 

Why Should You Choose the SIG P320? 

You should choose the P320 if you want a slightly more refined gun. 

It’s also a good choice if you want a gun you can tinker with and change parts at will, and with ease. 

With the P320 being the Army’s new gun of choice it certainly appeals to the military collector. SIG has released a clone of the XM17 and 18 series for those buyers. 

The P320 allows you the ability to swap calibers with ease, so if this appeals to you it’s certainly the choice for you. 

If you live in a state famous for gun control the P320 may be the right choice for you. 

If it’s a hassle to buy a gun, buying a P320 will let you change between gun sizes for home defense, concealed carry, and even competition. 

Why Should You Choose the Glock 17?

You should choose a Glock 17 if you want a gun that is well proven for over 30 years. 

It’s a serviceable gun that will always have support. The Glock series of handguns have a lower overall cost of ownership over the years and you can find them anywhere. 

The SIG P320 may be the go-to for the big army, but the Glock series has been used by Special Ops troops for years. 

The Glock is an amazing go-to handgun and its a weapon with a rock-solid reputation. It’s easy to upgrade and can be upgraded in almost any way you can imagine.

Glock 17 vs Sig P320: At the End of the Day

Both Glock and SIG Sauer make outstanding weaponry. 

Both the SIG P320 and Glock 17 are excellent firearms. It’s also true that over time both the P320 and Glock 17 have hit hitches in their design. 

The Glock 17 Gen 4 release almost immediately needed a recall, and of course, the SIG P320 had a drop safe failure issue. 

These days both guns are problem-free and proven in the hands of law enforcement, the military and thousands of concealed carriers. If you are finding it hard to choose one over the other, do the American thing and buy both! 

Regardless of which model you choose between the Glock 17 vs Sig P320, Clinger Holsters has the best gun holsters. Don’t forget to carry a spare magazine, ( we have you covered with a spare mag pouch there as well!). 

shield m2.0 vs pps m2

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 (with pictures)

PPS M2 VS Shield M2.0 

Which Is Better For Concealed Carry?

Smith and Wesson sold well over 1,000,000 M&P Shields. The latest version – S&W Shield M2.0 – is even better. It’s that darn good. Walther engineered one of the highest-rated Single Stack Nines in existence with the  Walther PPS M2. Between the Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0, which is more worthy of your hard-earned dollars?

If we could only pick one for concealed carry, which would find itself on our belt?

Because capitalism is awesome, not only is there a handgun for every imaginable purpose, there are usually multiple competing products that each proclaim they fill a given niche better than any other similar product. 

So when it comes down to the PPS M2 and the Shield M2.0, which is better? Does it matter? Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Comparison

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0: Are there significant differences? 

And most importantly, should pineapple be on pizza? No. Wait, let’s go back to the guns. It will be easier to answer those questions. 

Now both guns are poly-framed, striker-fired pistols chambered in 9mm and marketed towards the concealed carry market. Both have similar capacity single stack magazines, and both are fighting for identical customers. 

Each gun is made by a well-established company that is famous for high-quality handguns built for real-world consumers. Each company has a cult following, and a long legacy of innovation and even cultural impact. 

Lastly, each company has been working hard to grab a piece of that high demand concealed carry holster market, and have been tailoring products to meet the demands and desires of concealed carriers everywhere. 

So let’s take a closer look.

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Grip Comparison

The Walther PPS M2: Quality & Ergonomics Perfected

Ever since Glock popularized ergonomically, polymer-framed striker-fired pistols with pistols like the Glock 19, the gun industry has been awash with attempts to grab some of that market. And this is where we have to face stark reality.

From a mechanical standpoint, there is precious little technical difference where it matters on these sorts of guns. There are small differences, but the technology is the same. 

The most common differences are the types of internal and passive safeties and the quality of the trigger. A spongy trigger can ruin a good gun. 

A great trigger can make a good gun legendary.

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Trigger Comparison

In this case, both guns offer great trigger feel with a good reset, so rather than engaging in nitpicking over small mechanical differences, we are going to look at more important differences.

Walther lists a number of key features for the PPS M2. 

Some are styling, others are far more interesting innovations that have become in great demand in this golden age of concealed carry that we now live in. Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Loaded Chamber Indicator Comparison

The PPS M2 includes a red loaded chamber indicator, that can be both felt and seen, a visible chamber viewport that allows for quick verification of if the gun is loaded, a uniquely textured grip, Tennifer coating for maximum corrosion resistance, three-dot metal sights, both front and rear slide serrations, and lightweight, fast resetting trigger. 

Multiple magazine options are available.

The PPS M2 ships with a six-round low profile, a seven-round magazine, and an extended 8 round magazine.

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Magazine Comparison

In addition, the mag release is designed to prevent accidental release and the entire gun is designed to be snag free when carried concealed.

So far, the PPS M2 looks pretty solid, so how does the Shield M2.0 stand up to it?

The Smith and Wesson M&P Shield M2.0: The Next Version of Greatness

Just as Walther is a venerable old name in handguns, so is Smith and Wesson. 

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Close Up Detailed Comparison

A few years back, Smith and Wesson blew the dust off another venerable name and brought back their Military and Police line for the 21st Century. 

The M&P line was Smith and Wesson’s answer to the booming striker-fired polymer-framed pistol market, and it was backed with tradition and reputation that Glock simply couldn’t match. Having created a viable full-sized contender in this market, Smith and Wesson (then turned to the concealed carry market, and brought out the Shield.

Many declared the M&P Shield the best Concealed Carry gun on the market.

We now have a newer version of that great pistol: Shield M2.0.Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Integrated Laser Comparison

As we’ve already discussed, there is nothing new under the sun with these types of guns, and the Shield M2.0 reads a lot like the PPS M2. 

Featuring a specially textured grip for a secure hold in all weather conditions, a lightweight, precision trigger, corrosion-resistant coating on the slide, a unique takedown system that does not require pulling the trigger, an optional 18 degree backstrap for a more natural hold, and a lifetime warranty, we start to see subtle and not so subtle differences between these two guns. 

Smith and Wesson ups the ante with their magazines as well, shipping a 7 round flush-fitting mag, and an 8 round extended grip magazine with the gun. 

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0: Major Differences

So, on paper, we’ve got two compact, single stack 9mm polymer-frame, striker-fired pistols from two of the world’s most famous handgun manufacturers. How do you choose between these two pistols?

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Bullet Side by Side ComparisonWell darn. Let’s look closely. 

The Shield M2.0 is 4.5” tall with the flush-fitting magazine to the Walther’s 4.4”. 

The Shield M2.0 is 6.1” long to the PPS M2’s 6.3”. 

They are nearly identical in weight as well, with the Walther PPS M2 weighing in at 21.1 ounces unloaded, to the S&W Shield M2.0’s 18.3 ounce unloaded weight.  You might be able to detect the 1.8-ounce difference but most can’t.

All these dimensional differences are really trivial.

However, Walther pulls ahead pretty quick in human engineering. Walther manages to add useful safety features to their gun. Being able to inspect the chamber without a press check, and having a visible and tactile loaded chamber indicator are really nice features. 

Smith and Wesson offer a Smith and Wesson Shield M2.0 with an external thumb safety, which while controversial in some circles, has been in demand on striker-fired guns since the ’80s, which gives them an edge in the safety department. They also have other caliber options for the M&P Shield M2.0, which is great for fans of calibers starting in 4.

Walther ships the PPS M2 with an octagonal rifled barrel, but out of a 3” barrel gun built for close-quarters work, I’m hard-pressed to get terribly worked up over that nice little touch, but when looking at nearly identical guns, sometimes it is those little touches that really matter. 

So Which One is Best for Concealed Carry?

Questions like this ensure gun writers and gun manufacturers will have plenty of work. However, it is also confusing for the consumer. We are down to the point of picking over small differences in guns that may or may not even matter to you, the concealed carrier or law enforcement officer. 

Either gun excels for the intended purpose of offering a modern, easily concealed handgun. While we might all wish to be able to carry a 1911 or a big magnum revolver, the fact of modern living often means that discretion is the better part of valor and must opt for a small, easily hidden pistol. 

Plus of course, there is something to be said for a lightweight handgun, regardless of how you choose to carry it. 

If you live in a place with oppressive and irrational magazine capacity limitations, you’ll appreciate being able to buy high quality, well designed 9mm pistol. For better or worse, either of these guns will be at home in places like New York State, or other capacity restricted jurisdictions. 

For those living in places that don’t require you to count the rounds in your gun, the compact, single stack designs offer easy concealing performance without major loss in firepower. 

Sure it would be nice to have a 19 round mag but…

Nearly every civilian gunfight will be over long before you even have to consider reloading either of these guns. 

If you like the passive safety features and Walther aesthetic, then the PPS M2 is for you. It is a fine looking gun, loaded with many small touches that make it stand out from the more utilitarian Shield M2.0. 

Add the octagonal rifled barrel, and better quality forward slide serration and it’s easy to see why so many people love the PPS M2.

Smith and Wesson bring an optional manual safety to the table.

This a deal-breaker for those that require one.

If you really want a different caliber than 9mm (although out of a lightweight, short compact pistol, larger calibers start to suffer more, and recoil harder), then Smith and Wesson offer you that choice as well. 

It Really Comes Down to Personal Choice.

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Sight Picture Comparison

Instead, the choice comes down to your personal preferences in the brand name, styling, and the voodoo of gut feeling. 

The ultimate decision between these two would probably come down to how it feels in your hand.

If I had to pick one…

I’d reach for the Walther, but only because I like the ergonomics and have fond memories of some really insane long-range shots with an octagonal rifled pistol.

Neither of these factors really declare the gun to be superior, simply different enough to be appealing to one person. You may not care about either of those but may find when comparing the two guns in a shop, that you like the trigger of one, over the other just a little bit more. 

If you are going for pocket carry, the Walther seems a bit more snag-free, but the idea of pocket carrying an unholstered striker-fired gun is terrifying. 

The Comfort Cling holster from Clinger Holsters solves this issue perfectly. 

The Comfort Cling holster stays in your pocket when you draw the gun out and protects the trigger while in your pocket.

If you are going for an IWB or belt holster carry, I think either gun would work equally well here as long as they’re in a high-quality holster. 

What’s the point in picking out a quality gun if you don’t get a high-quality holster?

Again, Clinger Holsters really shine here. The V3 No Print Wonder or V3 Stingray holsters are both excellent choices for Concealed Carry.

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0: Conclusion

Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0 Kydex Holster Comparison

Both are good guns, and both will do the job they are designed for. Each is also designed to appeal to the broad concealed carry market. 

Both also have unique ergonomics that will appeal to different consumers. 

It is a testimony to modern manufacturing and consumer demand that we can look at two competing handguns and find them both effectively identical, but also different enough to provide variety to those who want it. 

The Bottom Line Is:

Compare how the trigger of each feels to you. Also, hold each of them and see which feels best in your hand. 

If you prefer Walther over Smith & Wesson or vice versa, the decision is easy.

You can’t go wrong with either of these great pistols.

For the best concealment possible, check out our Walther PPS M2 holsters and our S&W Shield M2.0 holsters. Clinger Holsters makes Concealed Carry easily when you are choosing between the Walther PPS M2 vs S&W Shield M2.0.

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X (with pictures)

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X

What’s the difference between the Glock G45 vs Glock G19X?

Glock has been releasing a ton of new pistols lately. Two of them (the Glock G45 vs Glock G19X) are very similar. Are you deciding between them?

Both are “crossover” pistols using Glock 17 frames with Glock 19 Slides and barrels.

So what are the real differences?

Also, who did Glock design these pistol for? 

Concealed Carriers have been chopping the grip off of Glock 17 pistols for years. They tend to want smaller grips (certainly not all of them though).

Want the short answer now between the Glock 19X vs 45?

These pistols were not designed for Concealed Carry.

That being said though, Glock fans are coming out in droves and snapping up these latest pistols specifically for their daily carry loadout. They work great for Concealed Carry if you’re not scared of a service pistol-sized grip. Especially in the right Glock 19X holsters and Glock 45 holsters.

There’s the first hint of who Glock designed these pistols for: They have a service pistol-sized grip. 

These Pistols are Designed for Service

The Glock G19X was designed for the US military…sort of. 

The Glock G19 MHS was designed for the MHS competition held by the US Army. 

The G19X is the civilian version of the G19 MHS.

As for the Glock G45…

It’s based on the Glock G19X and designed for Police duty.

Police have been eyeballing the Glock G19X for duty. But it didn’t quite fit the bill.

Why not you ask… It’s Coyote Tan instead of Black.

Enter the Glock G45. 

The G45 is not just a black G19X though. There are a few differences.

To better understand this Glock G45 VS Glock G19X comparison, we need to dive a little deeper into both pistols’ background.


Glock G19X – Designed for Military

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Soldier

Glock entered the G19 MHS into the Modular Handgun System program (along with every other company that hoped to make hundreds of millions of dollars).

They chose the Sig P320 over the Glock G19X in the open competition to win Uncle Sam’s favor.

Glock didn’t win the half-billion-dollar contract with the G19 MHS but all was not lost. Their loss is our gain. 

Glock tweaked the Glock G19 MHS and named it the Glock G19X before releasing it to the public.

When designing the G19 MHS, they envisioned a Colt Commander sized pistol as an ideal military sidearm. Many expected Glock to offer up a Glock 17 variant to the MHS competition. 

Instead, Glock offered up a pistol that feels like a Glock G17 but with a little quicker handling and balance due to the G19-length barrel and slide.

While a longer sight radius can help with long shots, a shorter sight radius is quicker to get on target.

Glock also put a manual thumb safety on the G19 MHS. 

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Safety Comparison

The manual thumb safety had to go for the civilian version.

Glock fans love Glocks for many reasons. Simplicity and the lack of “unnecessary“ controls are two of the biggest reasons.

Losing the manual safety was the primary change to the Glock G19 MHS that Glock made to “create” the Glock G19X.

So what changes did Glock make to the Glock G19X to “create” the Glock G45?Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Holsters Comparison


Glock G45 – Designed for Police

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Police Officer ComparisonAs mentioned earlier, the Glock G19X was being eyeballed hard by many police officers as the perfect duty pistol.

It had as many bullets as the Glock 17 with the “easier to live with” barrel length of the Glock 19. 

Because (most) police aren’t concerned with concealment, they wouldn’t want to give up the ammo capacity of the G17 to switch to the G19. But giving up an inch of barrel length doesn’t have any major drawbacks.

Glock has never been a company to ignore police requests. 

Police have been Glock’s bread and butter for decades.

It took just a few short months for Glock to get a similar version available in black to the market.

However, it’s important to note that the Glock G45 isn’t just a Glock 19x black. While the G19X looked like a Gen 5 pistol, it was more like a Gen 4.5.

The Glock G45 is a Gen 5 Glock.

The Gen 5 pistols are supposed to be the most reliable Glock pistols to date based on Glock tests.

The G45 also has a beveled and flared magazine well as all Gen 5 Glocks do.

The G45 has a surprising additional feature.

It has front serrations on the slide. Front serrations are preferred by some for press checking their pistol. Glock has started adding these front serrations to more of their pistols. I’d look for them to add them to many more models in the future.Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Comparison 2


Glock G19X vs Glock 45 – Recap of Differences

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Detailed Comparison Side by Side

Before we look at the differences between the Glock G19X vs Glock 45, let’s look at the similarities.

Both have:

  • nDLC Coating
  • Marksman Barrel
  • Ambi Slide Stop Lever
  • No Finger Grooves
  • Glock 17 Frame
  • Glock 19 Barrel and Slide

Now for the differences.

The Glock G45:

  • New Gen 5 Platform
  • Black
  • Front Slide Serrations
  • All Gen 5 Internal Enhancements
  • Gen 5 Magazines
  • Flared Mag Well
  • No Lanyard Loop

The Glock G19X:

  • Modified Gen 4 Platform
  • Coyote Tan
  • No Slide Serrations
  • Some Gen 5 Enhancements
  • Gen 4 Magazines
  • Gen 4 Non-Flared Mag Well
  • Lanyard Loop

The G19X doesn’t have the flared mag well. The flared mag well on the newer Gen 5 pistols helps guide the magazine in easier and faster during reloads.

The Glock G19X uses the older Gen 4 Magazines. This means the new Gen 5 magazines won’t fit. The Gen 5 magazines have a longer base plate that extends further forward. The longer base plate is supposed to make it easier to yank out stuck magazines.


Glock 45X vs Glock G19X – Why Would You Want a Glock “Crossover” Pistol?

Most civilians will reach for the Glock G19 for Concealed Carry or home defense. Some will prefer the Glock G17 for home defense and sometimes even Concealed Carry.

What benefits would prompt someone to reach for the Glock G19X or G45 instead of a Glock G19 or G17?

Benefit #1:

The Glock G19X comes with 17 & 19 round magazines. That’s a lot of ammo. You can, of course, carry the same 19 round magazines with the G19. 

However, the bigger Glock G17 frame works much better with the extended mags. 

The longer magazines look and feel better in the G17 frame than in the G19 frame.

Benefit # 2:Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Pinch Point Comparison

Many shooters say the Glock G17 frame is more comfortable than the compact G19 frame. 

Plus, it’s less likely to pinch your hand during reloads.

Those with bigger hands can get pinched when reloading the Glock G19. The magazine base plate and the bottom of the grip can pinch your skin pretty good if you’re not careful. It’s rare but has been reported on many forums and Youtube videos.

Practice can help prevent the mag pinch of the shorter G19 frame but it is one drawback for some shooters.

Benefit #3:

The shorter barrel mated to the full-size grip balances very well in the hand. 

It handles very well at the range. You’ll get the benefits of a full-sized frame plus the benefits that come with the shorter barrel. 

While a longer barrel does have some advantages – accurate long shots & more muzzle velocity – the shorter barrel comes with its advantages.

If you want a quick-handling gun with the advantages of a full-sized grip and large bullet count, these two crossover pistols from Glock will be just what you’re looking for.

Benefit #4:

The shorter barrel won’t poke your seat. 

This would be a welcome upgrade to many police. The shorter barrel will be more comfortable in the cramped seat of a police cruiser.

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Police Officer

With tons of gear on their belts and tons of electronics and gear in their vehicle, police don’t have much wiggle room behind the wheel of their vehicles.

Losing the extra inch off the end of the barrel will be preferable to many officers. Any extra room they can gain in their seat will be welcome.

This works out for civilians too! For instance, the Sig P226 is an amazing gun. However, I carry the P229 much more often because it doesn’t jack my belt up when I sit down.

Both Sig pistols have the same size grip and ammo count. But the P229 carries much better.

That same principle applies to the Glock 17 VS Glock G45.

Benefit #5:

The Glock G19X and Glock G45 have a solid front strap. 

Many shooters hate the cutout in the front of the Glock Gen 5 grip. It does have the advantage of making it easier to rip out a sticky magazine.

Glock G45 VS Glock G19X Cutout ComparisonBut many forums have comments like this:

“My pinky finds that dang cutout every time! I hate that thing.”

I’ve even seen comments like this:

“Has anyone chopped down the Glock G19X yet? I know that’s pretty much a Glock 19 but I really don’t like the cutout.”

It’s a matter of preference really as to whether or not you prefer a cutout in the grip or not. 


Glock 45X vs Glock G19X – Which One Should You Buy?

Unless Coyote Tan is your favorite color, the obvious choice here is the Glock G45. The Glock G19X has no clear advantages; unless you consider color and a lanyard loop advantages. 

The Glock G45 has all of the new Gen 5 upgrades. The Glock G19X only has most of the Gen 5 upgrades.

The G45 has front slide serrations and a flared mag well. 

The Glock Gen 5 pistol lineup has proven to be the most reliable pistol Glock has ever tested. The Gen 5 platform pistols will fire more rounds than Gen 4 Glocks before a malfunction eventually happens.

All that being said…

If you can live without front slide serrations and you think a Coyote Tan Glock is too hard to pass up, by all means, get the Glock G19X.

Otherwise, get the Glock G45…and a durable Kydex concealed carry holster while you’re at it.

Would you choose the Glock 19 over the Glock 26 for concealed carry

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 (with pictures)

Glock 19 vs Glock 26

A True Sibling Rivalry

Glock has a well-rounded lineup of thoroughbreds in their stable between the Glock 19 vs Glock 26. There’s no doubt of that.

But suppose you had to pick just one horse to take on a journey.

Which one would you scratch behind the ears?

What makes the Glock 19 so popular?

The Glock 19 is probably the most well-rounded pistol ever invented. It is the pistol by which most others are judged. It accommodates 15 rounds of 9mm stopping power in a 23-ounce package. Unbelievable.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Concealed Carry Comparison

What’s so great about the Glock 26?

The Glock 26 weighs in at a paltry 21 ounces and is just 4.17 inches high. You can’t find a shorter pistol (measured from the bottom of the magazine to the top of the rear sight). And it holds ten 9mm rounds. If you can’t conceal a Glock 26, you need to ditch the skinny jeans.

Both of these pistols are excellent. They’re both in our Best 50 Guns For Concealed Carry blog post.

Do the pros outweigh the cons for one of these pistols more than the other?

Let’s find out!

 

Glock 19 Background: Born From Legendary DNA

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Concealed Carry Close Up Comparison

The Glock 19 has been one of the best selling pistols in the civilian pistol market since its introduction in 1988. To understand its greatness, a quick look at the Glock 17 is necessary.

After all, the Glock 19 is just a modified version of the Glock 17.

The Glock 19 was Glock’s followup to the extremely successful Glock 17 pistol that took the world by storm after procuring the contract to replace the outdated pistols in the Austrian Armed Forces. Glock developed the Glock 17 specifically to compete in that competition.

The Glock 17 beat plenty of pedigree pistol producers during testing (including H&K, SIG Sauer, and Beretta). Within a couple of years, it was used by armies and police departments all over the world.

What was so different about the Glock in 1982? In a word, polymer.

The Glock 17 is the pistol that made people say things back in the 1980s
like “I’ll never own a Tupperware gun” & “Those new plastic guns can slip past metal detectors.”

But the armies and police who carried it knew better. It was lighter, more reliable, and had a higher capacity (not to mention a lower price tag) than most any other pistol on the market at the time. It was truly a revolutionary pistol.

And yes, Glock pistols will set off a metal detector as we now know!

The Glock 17 is a great duty pistol. It just wasn’t designed to fulfill the role of a concealment pistol.

From This Legend, The Glock 19 Was Born

The Glock 19 is half an inch shorter in both height and length than the Glock 17. Because of the shorter grip, it holds 15 rounds rather than 17.

So basically the Glock 19 is a compact version of the gun used by professionals everywhere: the Glock 17.

Back in 1988 when the Glock 19 was introduced, it was designed for military and law enforcement use.

There are plenty of scenarios in military and police roles where a compact pistol comes in handy. Especially if it still handles almost as good as a full-sized pistol.

It doesn’t hurt if the compact pistol can still manage to stuff 15 rounds of 9mm ammunition inside. After all, the US military’s “new” (introduced in 1985) Beretta M9 held 15 rounds and it’s a significantly larger handgun than the Glock 19.

It Was A Huge Success For Glock

Who wouldn’t want a 23-ounce pistol that held 15 rounds after all? Sure that’s (somewhat) more common today but not in 1988!
Many police at the time carried the S&W Model 36 Chief’s Special as their backup at the time. Guess how much it weighed?… 19.5 ounces.

Compare the new (in 1988) Glock 19 with the Chief’s Special. At 23 ounces, the Glock 19 is only 4 ounces heavier and you’ve got 15 rounds of 9mm vs 5 rounds of 38.

It was obvious from the start that the Glock 19 was here to stay.

The Glock 19 quickly became popular with police and civilians alike. With the right Glock 19 holsters, civilians could easily conceal the G19.

Detectives quite often preferred the smaller Glock 19 to the Glock 17. It was a bit lighter and more convenient to wear all day.

Also, on occasions where a detective might not want to broadcast his armed status, the Glock 19 was much easier to conceal under a shirt or jacket.

Undercover detectives especially appreciated how much easier the smaller Glock 19 was to conceal. However, they never felt that they had too little firepower. 15+1 is a lot of firepowers. Consider also that a backup Glock 17 magazine (fully compatible with the Glock 19) adds another 17 rounds to the firefight.

People soon realized that they could carry a compact pistol that functioned almost as well as a service pistol.

Of Course, Glock’s Fan Base Exploded

The Glock 19 has grown in popularity ever since.

After successfully conquering the military, police, and civilian gun markets, Glock decided to stop there and rest on its laurels.

Just kidding.

After a successful release of their new compact pistol, Glock looked to their next challenge: a subcompact pistol.

Glock 26 Background: A Smaller Chip Off The Ol’ Block

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Detailed Comparison

If the Glock 19 is a chopped down Glock 17, the Glock 26 is a just a chopped down G19. Well, sort of. It took a little more engineering to shrink the Glock 26 down.

If there was a consumer base that believed “smaller is better” (and there was), Glock was going to find another winning horse to back.

In 1995, Glock introduced a revolutionary pistol to the handgun market. While it’s true that the Glock 26 would help Glock’s tendrils fully infiltrate the civilian market, it would bring unprecedented influence to the police market as well.

Bye Bye J Frame, Hello Baby Glock

Police officers immediately had a eureka moment when they handled the Glock 26.

The Glock 26 weighs about the same as the S&W Model 36 snub nose revolver (a common police backup handgun at the time) while squirreling away more than twice the ammo. It holds 11 rounds vs 5. The slightly extended mag elevated it to 12+1.

This Was Truly Groundbreaking

The bigger ammo count was just one groundbreaking benefit of the Baby Glock. What could be as groundbreaking as adding 8 rounds to a backup handgun? When carried in the right Glock 26 holsters, it was a huge benefit to police.

Consistent Manual Of Arms

If your backup gun functions exactly like your primary gun, you’ll shoot it better. Because the G26’s trigger pull is the same as the G19’s trigger pull and both pistols’ controls are in the same positions, little additional training is necessary to shoot it well. Even Glock’s sights are all the same.

Do You Carry Extra Ammo For Your Backup Gun?

Most people will only carry extra ammo for their primary weapon (if even then), not their backup gun.

Here’s where the Glock 26 shines. It accepts Glock 17 and Glock 19 magazines. So if you have a Glock 19 mag pouch, you can use it for the Glock 17 and Glock 26. What’s even better than flexibility? We have developed a sturdy mag pouch that will allow you to easily carry spare mags in your front pocket.

If you are using a Glock 26 to defend your life, there’s a possibility that the pistol could run out of ammo before the threat is neutralized.

The Glock 26 is a backup gun that an officer would have extra ammo for. He’d simply pull a fully loaded Glock 17 mag off his belt and load it into the Glock 26.

Your Backup Pistol Just Got 17 More Rounds

This is the other half of that Eureka moment officers had when they were first introduced to the Glock 26. Not only did their backup gun use the same ammo, but it also used the same magazines.

Glock intended the Glock 26 to help them gain traction in the civilian gun market. But guess what another market Glock was selling boatloads of Baby Glocks to?

To Glock’s surprise, they found another gun model that was selling like hotcakes to the police market!

Now that policeman was carrying the Glock 26, it transitioned perfectly from a backup gun to a primary carry when off duty.

Policeman, off duty policeman, and civilians alike started carrying the Glock 26 to protect their lives. The Glock 26 was a pleasant surprise in the mid-1990s. It changed the way we think about our backup pistols.

It gave those who already carried a Glock a more sensible backup pistol. The Glock 26 made sense when it was introduced in 1995 and it still makes sense today. It’s been a major influence on the gun design and concealed carry for well over two decades now.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Appendix Carry View

Need More Proof Of Its Influence?

Look at many of the “new” concealed carry guns on the market today. You can check in with most of the big names in the pistol market today and you’ll see their subcompact guns competing for primacy.

From Beretta to Walther, everyone’s making chopped versions of their service-sized pistols. And most of them will accept the mags from the bigger pistols.

Keep in mind that Glock’s been doing this for decades!

Now that we’ve fully explored the rich history and background of the Glock 19 and Glock 26, let’s have some more fun.

Let’s play Devil’s Advocate with both pistols.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Why You Should Choose The Glock 19

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Holsters Comparison

Pop Quiz: Home Invasion

Your home alarm wakes you up at 2 AM. You quickly pull up your camera feed and see a burglar just a few steps away from your bedroom door.

You have a loaded Glock 19 and a loaded Glock 26 on your nightstand. Which one do you grab?

C’mon. This is a loaded question. Of course, you grab the biggest gun you can get your hands on. If you had a loaded shotgun propped against your nightstand, you’d have it aimed at the bedroom door.

Here’s The Point:
You always choose the biggest, worst weapon you can if you know you’re going to be in a fight.

What Do Bigger Guns Offer?
1. More ammo.
2. More accuracy.
3. Less recoil.
4. Faster follow up shots.

While some Concealed Carriers can successfully carry big service-sized pistols like the Glock 17 every day, most can’t.

Just as the Glock 17 is better than the Glock 19 in a firefight, so is the Glock 19 better than the Glock 26.

This is why the Glock 19 is so appealing. The pistol is just big enough to get a full grip on. Yet it is shorter in height and length than the full-sized Glock 17.

Translation:
It handles much like a service pistol but is also concealable.

It also has 15+1 rounds of 9mm compared to the Glock 26’s smaller magazine. Those extra 5 rounds could be needed in a shootout.

It’s hard to imagine a scenario where 16 rounds wouldn’t be enough in a defensive situation.

You should choose to carry the Glock 19 over the Glock 26 if you can successfully conceal it.

Everybody has different body shapes and dimensions. Some people could carry an Uzi in their waistband and nobody would be the wiser. Others have a hard time concealing a little pocket-sized .380 pistol.

You should always carry the biggest gun you can manage for the day.

Different variables factor into how many guns a person can conceal.

A wardrobe is usually the biggest limitation on how many guns you can carry.

An untucked shirt can easily hide a Glock 19 for most people; though not everyone. How baggy your shirt must depend on your body shape and where on your waist you carry your gun.

If you wear form-fitting sport shirts that are tucked in, you might have trouble carrying a Glock 19. But maybe you could; it depends on your unique body shape.

Most people could conceal the Glock 19. The question is: would you conceal the Glock 19.

If you bought the Glock 19 for Concealed Carry but left it home most days, it wouldn’t serve you very well for Concealed Carry.

The First Rule In Gunfighting: Bring A Gun!

A .380 in your pocket beats a Glock 19 at home every time! If you have to defend your life though, wouldn’t you curse yourself for only having a mouse gun instead of a real gun?

If you’re more likely to leave a Glock 19 at home than carry it, get a Glock 26!

Let’s check out why the Glock 26 is so great for Concealed Carry.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Why You Should Choose The Glock 26

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Kydex Holsters Comparison

First thing first. Let’s get this out in the open immediately.

The Glock 26 is not a mouse gun. It’s a full-fledged, real gun.

I’m not knocking mouse guns. They have their place. You can almost always take a mouse gun with you on the rare occasions you can’t carry a real gun.

How Well Does The Glock 26 Perform?

Great. It does perform wonderfully at the range. This is a fun gun to shoot.

It’s big enough that recoil doesn’t cause your hand to hurt after 50 rounds. It holds enough rounds (11) to unleash long strings of shots at your target.

Plus, it’s accepted longer magazines from the Glock 19 and Glock 17. You can shoot up to 17 more rounds after a tactical reload.

Good Firepower, Small Package

The Glock 26 is small enough to take with you when you leave the house. It weighs in at a measly 21 ounces to boot.

You have no excuse to be unarmed if you own one. You should almost always be able to conceal the Glock 26 somewhere on your person before leaving your castle.

If you are forced to defend your life with it, you’ll thank yourself for not arming yourself with a mouse gun. 10+1 rounds of 9mm in a highly shootable package will almost always be enough to defend your life.

If you practice with the Glock 26, you can shoot it accurately and quickly. Sure, you could shoot the Glock 19 more accurately and even faster with practice. But that only counts if would carry the Glock 19 every day.

A bigger gun does you no good in your safe. The Glock 26 on your hip will outperform your Glock 19 in your safe should you have to defend your life.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Final Decision

Get the Glock 19…if you’ll carry it…everyday.

The Glock 19 handles better.

If you can’t commit to carrying the more tactical pistol (every single day), get the Glock 26.

The truth is that they’re both great pistols. The Glock 19 is the greater of the two though.

Always leave your home with the biggest pistol you feel comfortable carrying with you. You’ll get more shots in your target faster with a bigger pistol. The shots will be more accurate and more numerous.

We can all imagine scenarios where extra concealment is desired though.

For example, suppose yours at your (anti-gun) cousin’s wedding. You would rather take extra care not to print than to upset your cousin (but there’s no way you’re resigning yourself to be defenseless).

Situations such as these are what the Glock 26 was made for!

This article is based on the premise of which Glock to buy if you can only have one of them. However, you can own as many as you want. Don’t you just love America? It may take some time to acquire more than one though depending on your budget.

Truth be told…you need both. So this conversation can steer towards which one to buy first.

I’d recommend getting the Glock 26 first. This ensures you’ll always be armed. Don’t forget to pick up the Glock 19 next. You’ll want to carry it as much as possible. Now, hopefully, you know which handgun to choose between the Glock 19 vs Glock 26.A&feature=youtu.be[/embed]

 

Glock 19 Background: Born From Legendary DNA

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Concealed Carry Close Up Comparison

The Glock 19 has been one of the best selling pistols in the civilian pistol market since its introduction in 1988. To understand its greatness, a quick look at the Glock 17 is necessary.

After all, the Glock 19 is just a modified version of the Glock 17.

The Glock 19 was Glock’s followup to the extremely successful Glock 17 pistol that took the world by storm after procuring the contract to replace the outdated pistols in the Austrian Armed Forces. Glock developed the Glock 17 specifically to compete in that competition.

The Glock 17 beat plenty of pedigree pistol producers during testing (including H&K, SIG Sauer, and Beretta). Within a couple of years, it was used by armies and police departments all over the world.

What was so different about the Glock in 1982? In a word, polymer.

The Glock 17 is the pistol that made people say things back in the 1980s
like “I’ll never own a Tupperware gun” & “Those new plastic guns can slip past metal detectors.”

But the armies and police who carried it knew better. It was lighter, more reliable, and had a higher capacity (not to mention a lower price tag) than most any other pistol on the 09HKDtFa_1market at the time. It was truly a revolutionary pistol.

And yes, Glock pistols will set off a metal detector as we now know!

The Glock 17 is a great duty pistol. It just wasn’t designed to fulfill the role of a concealment pistol.

From This Legend, The Glock 19 Was Born

The Glock 19 is half an inch shorter in both height and length than the Glock 17. Because of the shorter grip, it holds 15 rounds rather than 17.

So basically the Glock 19 is a compact version of the gun used by professionals everywhere: the Glock 17.

Back in 1988 when the Glock 19 was introduced, it was designed for military and law enforcement use.

There are plenty of scenarios in military and police roles where a compact pistol comes in handy. Especially if it still handles almost as good as a full-sized pistol.

It doesn’t hurt if the compact pistol can still manage to stuff 15 rounds of 9mm ammunition inside. After all, the US military’s “new” (introduced in 1985) Beretta M9 held 15 rounds and it’s a significantly larger handgun than the Glock 19.

It Was A Huge Success For Glock

Who wouldn’t want a 23-ounce pistol that held 15 rounds after all? Sure that’s (somewhat) more common today but not in 1988!
Many police at the time carried the S&W Model 36 Chief’s Special as their backup at the time. Guess how much it weighed?… 19.5 ounces.

Compare the new (in 1988) Glock 19 with the Chief’s Special. At 23 ounces, the Glock 19 is only 4 ounces heavier and you’ve got 15 rounds of 9mm vs 5 rounds of 38.

It was obvious from the start that the Glock 19 was here to stay.

The Glock 19 quickly became popular with police and civilians alike. With the right Glock 19 holsters, civilians could easily conceal the G19.

Detectives quite often preferred the smaller Glock 19 to the Glock 17. It was a bit lighter and more convenient to wear all day.

Also, on occasions where a detective might not want to broadcast his armed status, the Glock 19 was much easier to conceal under a shirt or jacket.

Undercover detectives especially appreciated how much easier the smaller Glock 19 was to conceal. However, they never felt that they had too little firepower. 15+1 is a lot of firepowers. Consider also that a backup Glock 17 magazine (fully compatible with the Glock 19) adds another 17 rounds to the firefight.

People soon realized that they could carry a compact pistol that functioned almost as well as a service pistol.

Of Course, Glock’s Fan Base Exploded

The Glock 19 has grown in popularity ever since.

After successfully conquering the military, police, and civilian gun markets, Glock decided to stop there and rest on its laurels.

Just kidding.

After a successful release of their new compact pistol, Glock looked to their next challenge: a subcompact pistol.

Glock 26 Background: A Smaller Chip Off The Ol’ Block

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Detailed Comparison

If the Glock 19 is a chopped down Glock 17, the Glock 26 is a just a chopped down G19. Well, sort of. It took a little more engineering to shrink the Glock 26 down.

If there was a consumer base that believed “smaller is better” (and there was), Glock was going to find another winning horse to back.

In 1995, Glock introduced a revolutionary pistol to the handgun market. While it’s true that the Glock 26 would help Glock’s tendrils fully infiltrate the civilian market, it would bring unprecedented influence to the police market as well.

Bye Bye J Frame, Hello Baby Glock

Police officers immediately had a eureka moment when they handled the Glock 26.

The Glock 26 weighs about the same as the S&W Model 36 snub nose revolver (a common police backup handgun at the time) while squirreling away more than twice the ammo. It holds 11 rounds vs 5. The slightly extended mag elevated it to 12+1.

This Was Truly Groundbreaking

The bigger ammo count was just one groundbreaking benefit of the Baby Glock. What could be as groundbreaking as adding 8 rounds to a backup handgun? When carried in the right Glock 26 holsters, it was a huge benefit to police.

Consistent Manual Of Arms

If your backup gun functions exactly like your primary gun, you’ll shoot it better. Because the G26’s trigger pull is the same as the G19’s trigger pull and both pistols’ controls are in the same positions, little additional training is necessary to shoot it well. Even Glock’s sights are all the same.

Do You Carry Extra Ammo For Your Backup Gun?

Most people will only carry extra ammo for their primary weapon (if even then), not their backup gun.

Here’s where the Glock 26 shines. It accepts Glock 17 and Glock 19 magazines. So if you have a Glock 19 mag pouch, you can use it for the Glock 17 and Glock 26. What’s even better than flexibility? We have developed a sturdy mag pouch that will allow you to adjust and pick which mags you want for your daily carry.

If you are using a Glock 26 to defend your life, there’s a possibility that the pistol could run out of ammo before the threat is neutralized.

The Glock 26 is a backup gun that an officer would have extra ammo for. He’d simply pull a fully loaded Glock 17 mag off his belt and load it into the Glock 26.

Your Backup Pistol Just Got 17 More Rounds

This is the other half of that Eureka moment officers had when they were first introduced to the Glock 26. Not only did their backup gun use the same ammo, but it also used the same magazines.

Glock intended the Glock 26 to help them gain traction in the civilian gun market. But guess what another market Glock was selling boatloads of Baby Glocks to?

To Glock’s surprise, they found another gun model that was selling like hotcakes to the police market!

Now that policeman was carrying the Glock 26, it transitioned perfectly from a backup gun to a primary carry when off duty.

Policeman, off duty policeman, and civilians alike started carrying the Glock 26 to protect their lives. The Glock 26 was a pleasant surprise in the mid-1990s. It changed the way we think about our backup pistols.

It gave those who already carried a Glock a more sensible backup pistol. The Glock 26 made sense when it was introduced in 1995 and it still makes sense today. It’s been a major influence on the gun design and concealed carry for well over two decades now.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Appendix Carry View

Need More Proof Of Its Influence?

Look at many of the “new” concealed carry guns on the market today. You can check in with most of the big names in the pistol market today and you’ll see their subcompact guns competing for primacy.

From Beretta to Walther, everyone’s making chopped versions of their service-sized pistols. And most of them will accept the mags from the bigger pistols.

Keep in mind that Glock’s been doing this for decades!

Now that we’ve fully explored the rich history and background of the Glock 19 and Glock 26, let’s have some more fun.

Let’s play Devil’s Advocate with both pistols.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Why You Should Choose The Glock 19

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Holsters Comparison

Pop Quiz: Home Invasion

Your home alarm wakes you up at 2 AM. You quickly pull up your camera feed and see a burglar just a few steps away from your bedroom door.

You have a loaded Glock 19 and a loaded Glock 26 on your nightstand. Which one do you grab?

C’mon. This is a loaded question. Of course, you grab the biggest gun you can get your hands on. If you had a loaded shotgun propped against your nightstand, you’d have it aimed at the bedroom door.

Here’s The Point:
You always choose the biggest, worst weapon you can if you know you’re going to be in a fight.

What Do Bigger Guns Offer?
1. More ammo.
2. More accuracy.
3. Less recoil.
4. Faster follow up shots.

While some Concealed Carriers can successfully carry big service-sized pistols like the Glock 17 every day, most can’t.

Just as the Glock 17 is better than the Glock 19 in a firefight, so is the Glock 19 better than the Glock 26.

This is why the Glock 19 is so appealing. The pistol is just big enough to get a full grip on. Yet it is shorter in height and length than the full-sized Glock 17.

Translation:
It handles much like a service pistol but is also concealable.

It also has 15+1 rounds of 9mm compared to the Glock 26’s smaller magazine. Those extra 5 rounds could be needed in a shootout.

It’s hard to imagine a scenario where 16 rounds wouldn’t be enough in a defensive situation.

You should choose to carry the Glock 19 over the Glock 26 if you can successfully conceal it.

Everybody has different body shapes and dimensions. Some people could carry an Uzi in their waistband and nobody would be the wiser. Others have a hard time concealing a little pocket-sized .380 pistol.

You should always carry the biggest gun you can manage for the day.

Different variables factor into how many guns a person can conceal.

A wardrobe is usually the biggest limitation on how many guns you can carry.

An untucked shirt can easily hide a Glock 19 for most people; though not everyone. How baggy your shirt must depend on your body shape and where on your waist you carry your gun.

If you wear form-fitting sport shirts that are tucked in, you might have trouble carrying a Glock 19. But maybe you could; it depends on your unique body shape.

Most people could conceal the Glock 19. The question is: would you conceal the Glock 19.

If you bought the Glock 19 for Concealed Carry but left it home most days, it wouldn’t serve you very well for Concealed Carry.

The First Rule In Gunfighting: Bring A Gun!

A .380 in your pocket beats a Glock 19 at home every time! If you have to defend your life though, wouldn’t you curse yourself for only having a mouse gun instead of a real gun?

If you’re more likely to leave a Glock 19 at home than carry it, get a Glock 26!

Let’s check out why the Glock 26 is so great for Concealed Carry.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Why You Should Choose The Glock 26

Glock 19 vs Glock 26 Kydex Holsters Comparison

First thing first. Let’s get this out in the open immediately.

The Glock 26 is not a mouse gun. It’s a full-fledged, real gun.

I’m not knocking mouse guns. They have their place. You can almost always take a mouse gun with you on the rare occasions you can’t carry a real gun.

How Well Does The Glock 26 Perform?

Great. It does perform wonderfully at the range. This is a fun gun to shoot.

It’s big enough that recoil doesn’t cause your hand to hurt after 50 rounds. It holds enough rounds (11) to unleash long strings of shots at your target.

Plus, it’s accepted longer magazines from the Glock 19 and Glock 17. You can shoot up to 17 more rounds after a tactical reload.

Good Firepower, Small Package

The Glock 26 is small enough to take with you when you leave the house. It weighs in at a measly 21 ounces to boot.

You have no excuse to be unarmed if you own one. You should almost always be able to conceal the Glock 26 somewhere on your person before leaving your castle.

If you are forced to defend your life with it, you’ll thank yourself for not arming yourself with a mouse gun. 10+1 rounds of 9mm in a highly shootable package will almost always be enough to defend your life.

If you practice with the Glock 26, you can shoot it accurately and quickly. Sure, you could shoot the Glock 19 more accurately and even faster with practice. But that only counts if would carry the Glock 19 every day.

A bigger gun does you no good in your safe. The Glock 26 on your hip will outperform your Glock 19 in your safe should you have to defend your life.

Speaking of smaller packages, the Glock 48 is basically a slimmer version of the Glock 19. You can read a full Glock 48 vs Glock 19 comparison here on our blog.

Glock 19 vs Glock 26: Final Decision

Get the Glock 19…if you’ll carry it…everyday.

The Glock 19 handles better.

If you can’t commit to carrying the more tactical pistol (every single day), get the Glock 26.

The truth is that they’re both great pistols. The Glock 19 is the greater of the two though.

Always leave your home with the biggest pistol you feel comfortable carrying with you. You’ll get more shots in your target faster with a bigger pistol. The shots will be more accurate and more numerous.

We can all imagine scenarios where extra concealment is desired though.

For example, suppose yours at your (anti-gun) cousin’s wedding. You would rather take extra care not to print than to upset your cousin (but there’s no way you’re resigning yourself to be defenseless).

Situations such as these are what the Glock 26 was made for!

This article is based on the premise of which Glock to buy if you can only have one of them. However, you can own as many as you want. Don’t you just love America? It may take some time to acquire more than one though depending on your budget.

Truth be told…you need both. So this conversation can steer towards which one to buy first.

I’d recommend getting the Glock 26 first. This ensures you’ll always be armed. Don’t forget to pick up the Glock 19 next. You’ll want to carry it as much as possible. Now, hopefully, you know which handgun to choose between the Glock 19 vs Glock 26.

3 Things to Do When You Can’t Carry

More and more often, as I do what “adults” do—I go into places where carrying a firearm is not permitted. I can’t carry in places like the courthouse, the doctor’s office (one in particular that had a metal detector), the hospital, etc.

You know the places I’m talking about. And there are even some of us that aren’t allowed to take our concealed carry weapons to work, either.

Well, alright—so I don’t have my pistol. Regardless of the place or establishment that doesn’t permit you to carry, there are a few things that you can do. One of the best things you can do is to use an IWB Holster or a Gear Holster.

1. If you can’t carry: stay alert

Yeah. Okay. But hear me out. This is the most important thing that you can do because this influences many of your other decisions, options, and choices. Seriously—situational awareness is one of the greatest tools in your concealed carry arsenal because it can help you avoid situations that otherwise could put you in jeopardy. Which, in this case, avoid potentially dangerous situations should be at the top of your list.

2. If you can’t carry: use words

Sometimes, things happen—maybe you bumped into the wrong guy at the hospital. Apologize. Or even get someone else’s attention. Your voice is just as much a self-defense tool as your CCW (which you had to leave in the car).

3. If you can’t carry: find other means

Pull a fire alarm. Now, in all possible scenarios, you should try everything and anything else to get yourself out of a dangerous situation if you can’t carry (if I’m not mistaken, you can be fined for pulling a fire alarm if there’s no fire…) before resorting to evacuating an entire building. There’s also furniture you can throw (if someone’s attacking you).

Now if you get the chance to prepare, I suggest learning how to defend yourself by other means as well regardless of whether you are a man or woman. Learn a martial art, some kickboxing, or even some basic hand-to-hand defense.

Hopefully, as you go about your business, you won’t need either your pistol or anything else. But it’s better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.

If you happen to have your handgun on hand, be sure that it’s concealed and ready for you to use it in our dependable Kydex holsters that are affordable and modular for all uses.

Has this been something you’ve had to consider? Often, or not at all?

Hannah Staton holds a Bachelor’s of Arts in Rhetoric and Writing from the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith where she also is a Writing Tutor. She was issued her Concealed Carry License in 2016, but has grown up around firearms her whole life. She is a Contributing Editor and Copy Writer for Clinger Holsters. She is an artist, cigar enthusiast, poet, and an avid shooter. She resides in Van Buren, Arkansas with her dog, Sunday and spends as much of her free time either with her family or making art. You can find her on Instagram @hr.staton or reach her by email: hr.staton@yahoo.com

2 Ways to Prevent Negligent Discharges

2 Ways to Prevent Negligent Discharges

Unfortunately, there are still instances happening of accidental discharges—even in 2018. Which is why all of us need to continue to preach gun safety. But I have two ways to help prevent negligent discharges, or at least make it (hopefully) less likely.

1. Prevent negligent discharges by getting rid of that old holster that’s falling apart.

Seriously. If you carry your CCW every day, imagine what your pants go through—sweat, heat, cold, dust, dirt, grime, lint, rain, mud, dog hair. The more you carry, the more your holster (and even your gun, too) is exposed to all manners of things, especially depending on your profession. When your holster starts to fall apart, the less secure your pistol is. It might even start to ride up if you’re carrying an IWB (if you know what I’m talking about, then you definitely need to retire yours).

Now, this includes your “expensive” holsters. Look—they are not going to last forever. They’re durable, sure, but not indestructible. After years and years, it’s going to wear out. If the material (especially that of fabric and some leather holsters) starts to bend and dip into the trigger well, then it’s time to get another one.

2. Prevent negligent discharges by investing in quality.

Yes, I already said that quality holsters can wear out, but when that time comes is entirely dependent on frequency of use, amount of abuse and wear, holster material, and even sometimes where you live (exposure to weather, like rain). But quality means that your higher dollar purchase is going to stretch over a longer period, especially if those concealed carry holsters modular and durable for a lifetime supply of use.

A lower quality holster that “kind-of” or “almost” fits your pistol isn’t going to cut it, and it’s definitely not safe. Good retention in a holster is key to safety because that means the gun isn’t going anywhere until it is unholstered. God forbid that cheap, $15 holster’s plastic clip break while you’re out or your IWB kydex holster and gun both slide out (and off) and fall to the ground.

Other than practicing the gun safety rules, do you think these two tips can help prevent accidental discharges?

Hannah Staton holds a Bachelor’s of Arts in Rhetoric and Writing from the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith where she also is a Writing Tutor. She was issued her Concealed Carry License in 2016, but has grown up around firearms her whole life. She is a Contributing Editor and Copy Writer for Clinger Holsters. She is an artist, cigar enthusiast, poet, and an avid shooter. She resides in Van Buren, Arkansas with her dog, Sunday and spends as much of her free time either with her family or making art. You can find her on Instagram @hr.staton or reach her by email: hr.staton@yahoo.com

7 Things to Keep in Your Gun Range Bag

7 Things to Keep in Your Gun Range Bag

Have you ever trekked to the gun range only to discover you forgot something you wish you had brought? Yeah. Me too. Well, here’s a list of things to permanently keep in your gun range bag so that doesn’t happen. (Some are pretty obvious, but just think of this as a reminder.)

1. Eye and Ear Protection

Like I said, yeah obviously. But you guys, I’ve had my eye protection break—lenses fall out, or some idiot (me) accidentally steps on them. Keep a spare in your bag in case something happens. At the range, safety is paramount for both eyes and ears. But also…

2. First Aid Kit

We’re all about preparedness and safety. A basic kit is important to have for things like insect bites, splinters, and the beginners who might accidentally get slide bites. It’s a good idea to have a first aid kit in your car at all times anyway, so another kit in your gun range bag isn’t a big deal.

3. Ammunition and Spare Magazines

Of course! You’re going to need ammunition, but you should take all you’re going to shoot. Trigger time is what’s going to help you in the long run, so it’s good to put as many through your pistol is possible. You should be practicing reloading, too, so having your extra magazines is paramount. In fact, if you’re looking to have some ammo out of your bag, you can check out our affordable Mag Pouch here.

4. Targets

This is probably the only thing that I regularly forget when heading to the range. In my gun range bag, I now keep balloons because they’re cheap, compact, light, and help me in my tactical drills with my kydex holster (shooting until the “threat” is gone, the popped balloon signaling this accomplishment). But you should grab your paper targets too; even if you have to fold them.

5. Staple gun (and/or Clothes Pins), Staples, Marker, Measuring Tape

Depending on where you do your shooting, you’ll need a way to hang your targets. Some ranges have vertically mounted pieces of plywood, some have stakes and chicken wire (like the range I haunt). So, either a staple gun (don’t forget staples, y’all) or clothespins can hold your targets up. You need the marker (particularly a black and permanent one) to circle previous shots for easy acquisition. The measuring tape doesn’t have to be big and bulky, just long enough to measure shot groups.

6. Firearm Cleaning & Maintenance Kit

This is just in case you run into a malfunction and need to get your pistol back into operational order. Otherwise, you’ll be wasting valuable range time.

7. Firearms & Holsters

Well yeah, we’re not talking about archery here, so you won’t need a bow. But if you have more than one concealed carry pistol (and you should check our post about this) then you need to practice with both. And you also need to practice unholstering and reholstering as well. Don’t bring your whole collection, just bring what you intend to practice with because holsters can take up quite a lot of space. We recommend having at least one adjustable and modular holster with you at all times. Checkout our concealed carry holster. Finally, if you’re only bringing a few pistols, and can separately and safely store them, go ahead and pack them in your bag as well.

Are there any other items I forgot to add to this list?

Hannah Staton holds a Bachelor’s of Arts in Rhetoric and Writing from the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith where she also is a Writing Tutor. She was issued her Concealed Carry License in 2016, but has grown up around firearms her whole life. She is a Contributing Editor and Copy Writer for Clinger Holsters. She is an artist, cigar enthusiast, poet, and an avid shooter. She resides in Van Buren, Arkansas with her dog, Sunday and spends as much of her free time either with her family or making art. You can find her on Instagram @hr.staton or reach her by email: hr.staton@yahoo.com

The Best Concealed Carry Self-Defense Ammunition

The Best Concealed Carry Self-Defense Ammunition

I know that many of you rush to the nearest store when it has a sale on ammo. In fact, I have done it myself. There’s not ever been a time when I’ve heard anyone say, “I have too many bullets.” I’m sure some of the vets out there who’ve been in firefights have actually wished they could say that. But in a concealed carry holsters, its important what concealed carry ammunition you put in your magazine.

When it comes to defense, I want a projectile that is going to expand—to create as big a hole as possible, increasing the chances of stopping a threat. For this, I’m willing to shell out a little more money, and I won’t have to buy more than a box to fill my magazines.

Surplus ammo—specifically full metal jacket—at a decent price is great for the range, however.

Which comes to my first point:

Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) Ammo is Best Left for the Range

Bulk ammunition is prime for range time. But I’m talking about full metal jacketed (FMJ) ammo. It makes nice, clean holes in the paper; eradicates balloons; all without breaking the bank. But the same can be said about tissue.

The thing about using the full metal jacket in your concealed carry pistol is that it’s going to penetrate and pass through the body. If no vital points are hit (i.e. the heart), an assailant could still proceed in his assault for a few minutes. That’s no good.

Instead, Have these Defense Ammunitions

Instead of FMJ, I primarily use a critical defense hollow points, or center point expanding cartridges for concealed carry ammunition. Defense ammo usually comes with a few extra grains (for you beginners, that means the cartridge has a little more powder which gives the load a little extra velocity). Upon contact the projectile mushrooms and penetrates deeply, making a larger wound; as it passes through tissue, it slows down.

I want every shot to count if I must resort to using my pistol. The larger the wound, the faster a predator is disabled.

My only suggestion is to do a bit of trial on defense rounds to discover for yourself what different defense ammunition does versus others. There is are different ways to do this, either by breaking out the ham steak, a watermelon, ballistic jell—whatever. But you’re going to want to use something that’s going to allow you to see how the projectile passes through something similar to tissue.

After you’ve carried your defense ammo for a while, there will be a time for you to change it out. I wrote another post about how often you should change your concealed carry ammunition; it goes into the depth that your ammo has been through whatever your pistol has—and will therefore need to be changed out. The cartridges are not “bad,” but you should change them and use the previously carried bullets at the range.

What defense ammunition do you use in your concealed carry pistol?

Speaking of concealed carry ammunition, if you have a magazine that needs a comfortable and secure hold, check out our affordable Mag Pouch here.

Hannah Staton holds a Bachelor’s of Arts in Rhetoric and Writing from the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith where she also is a Writing Tutor. She was issued her Concealed Carry License in 2016, but has grown up around firearms her whole life. She is a Contributing Editor and Copy Writer for Clinger Holsters. She is an artist, cigar enthusiast, poet, and an avid shooter. She resides in Van Buren, Arkansas with her dog, Sunday and spends as much of her free time either with her family or making art. You can find her on Instagram @hr.staton or reach her by email: hr.staton@yahoo.com

The Utility of a Second Concealed Carry Weapon

The Utility of a Second Concealed Carry Weapon

I’m always writing about how I carry seasonally, well… that’s one of the few reasons why it’s useful to have at least a second concealed carry weapon. Now, I don’t know many people who say, “I DON’T NEED ANOTHER GUN” but here are a few reasons to consider it:

1. Variety

We’ve all heard the saying: “Variety is the spice of life!” Well, that’s true. It’s nice to have options, and humans experience a great many things from diversity. As shooters, it can make you a more adaptable marksman. But this necessitates the need for practice even more. Once you have another pistol, you definitely need to get yourself to the range more often. It’ll also change up your range time, as well.

I’m not saying that you should bug-out and buy… 30 pistols (I’m also not ragging on those of you who collect). What I’m saying is that in contrast, too many pistols can create a sticky situation where you don’t go to the range. In fact, my step-father was guilty of this too often—although in his defense, he also was an instructor, so he was going to the range more than me.

But he also stressed the importance of having a basic collection for personal and home defense. I have also adopted his collection list: 2 concealed carry pistols, a shotgun, and a rifle. Versatility without overwhelming. If you need recommendations, I suggest getting a barrel gun as your second CCW and a rifle that chambers the same ammunition or both pistols in the same caliber. Whatever works for you.

2. Potential Evidence

In the event that you must use your pistol in self-defense, it will become evident. Now, I’m not in law enforcement, but I do understand that often pieces of evidence can betide up by court hearings, appeals, or even eventually destroyed.

If your only concealed carry pistol is admitted into evidence, you will be unarmed, and may potentially never get it back. You do not need to be left defenseless; having another CCW Pistol & Gun Holster will prevent that from happening.

3. Potential Ruin

Recently there have been many fires in my community. Now, I don’t honestly know if a pistol could survive a house fire (especially if it isn’t kept in a safe or another fire-proof case). Honestly, if you guys have any ideas or experience with this, I’d be interested to read what you have to say.

And it’s unfortunate to consider, but if someone lifts your pistol, you’ll also be defenseless. (Let’s all hope this isn’t a case we need to plan to prevent—hopefully, your CCWs are on your person so this has no potential as a case.)

Regardless, the point here is to keep you armed regardless of what happens.

Do you think there is another reason that necessitates a second CCW?

If you just received your second CCW and are looking for a durable and modular holster, check out our Kydex holsters here.